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  1. Today
  2. 2.5itim

    2.5itim’s 2018? Builds

    I was short on string blocks so I went ahead and made a couple up on the Bridgeport tonight. I’ll get them over to the powdercoater and they will be ready for these two guitars.
  3. I carved this solid pine body, and the first one where I painted the neck. I used a DeMarzio Pickup, Blues Bucker. Very happy with the feel and sound.
  4. Yesterday
  5. avengers63

    Bent side ES style

    I havent made much progress when we talked last. I was sidetracked with my bedroom & hall renovation. I almost have all the "purfling" on. Soon I'll have the back and center block on and have it closely resembling a body.
  6. 2.5itim

    Not Quite A Tele...

    Awesome! Can’t wait to see the progress on this. I hate planing zebrawood and always have a fit with it so I will have to remember that.
  7. 2.5itim

    2.5itim’s 2018? Builds

    Pics don’t really do justice to the body colors, I’ll try to get some better ones at some point. I do have one question, on my last build I painted the headstock face and mountain logo then top coated it in polycrylic. Does anyone know how I should go about this one? I want to leave the headstock face natural and paint the mountain logo, I was thinking just do a couple of coats of polycrilic as a “primer”, paint the logo, top coat everything with polycrylic as normal. But would the polycrylic make an ok “base” under the paint or should I use something else? Any help would be greatly appreciated.
  8. 2.5itim

    2.5itim’s 2018? Builds

    I found some extra time this weekend to do guitar stuff, I did a few things on the m11 Black limba padauk twin but nothing to really show. I’m waiting on my bridge and tuners to come in from hipshot for that one which they should be here today. I spent most of the weekend working on this aquaburst ta28, I started it right before I took my hiatus last year so figure I’ll knock it out real quick. I already had the body completely finished, dyed and tru oiled. The neck was scarf jointed and 12 degrees, neck and headstock shape cut, truss rod installed, fretboard made/radiused/blind slotted/glued on, neck was carved. So this weekend I installed my side dots and offset feet markers and also fretted it. Now just need to Finish sand the neck, do my mountain logo on the headstock, tru oil and fret level/crown/Dress and the neck will be finished. Specs so far are: ta28/6 model, solid ash body at 1.5” thick (a little thicker than my usual), honey roasted maple neck, honey roasted curly maple fretboard, nickel silver medium jumbo fret wire, aguaburst top dye, blue jean back dye, tru oil I’m sure it will get dimarzio pickups, hipshot bridge and tuners Here’s some pics of where I’m at with it at the moment
  9. curtisa

    Guitar Pick Materials

    Understood. I had assumed your statement meant that you didn't know how to subscribe to the thread, rather than you didn't want to. I would've thought that making a CZ pick thin enough would also make it too brittle to either be machined reliably or long lasting under playing conditions. It might be hard, but it's probably also prone to breakage at the thicknesses that make it usable as a pick, unless you're happy for it to be similar in shape and size to, say a Dunlop Stubby. I guess what I meant was, is there a particular set of dimensions and angles you're working towards when refining the shape of your picks, and how did you arrive at those values? It's not clear (to me at least) what you mean when you use terms like horizontal/vertical angle, sharpening vertically etc in your paper. A diagram defining what these terms refer to would help. You mention that refining the shape is leading you towards faster speed and lower contact area, but in the photos in your paper, many of the modified picks have quite a 'broad' tip with a large included angle. Isn't this increasing the contact area? To that end, wouldn't a tip with a smaller included angle with the smallest amount of contact area be better for speed, such as a stock teardrop shape or the smaller Dunlop Jazz III? I personally find that the small red Jazz III works for me. I used to use the standard Dunlop Tortex picks exclusively, maybe 1 - 1.3mm thicknesses. Years ago a friend of mine gave me a teardrop pick to try and I immediately fell in love with the small shape, the rigidity and fine point. That eventually led on to the Jazz III, and I've never changed back since. Even now If I go back to the standard-sized pick it feels like I'm trying to pick the strings with a dinner plate; it just feel too big and clumsy in my hands. Weirdly I couldn't get along with the black Jazz IIIs, despite it being the same size and shape as the red ones. The surface finish was slightly different, which made it harder for me to hold on to. The red one is more glossy and easier for me to get a grip with. Super-thick picks don't sit right with me (3mm Dunlop Stubby). Too chunky and clubby. I did try a couple of metal picks years ago. I may still have them somewhere. I had a copper one made from maybe 0.5mm sheet and a quite thick stainless steel (perhaps 1.3mm?); both were the standard shape. The thin copper one tended to snag on the strings a lot which I found irritating (could've been cheaply made with rough edges though). At the time I was heavily influenced by Joe Satriani, and would regularly incorporate pick scrapes on the lower strings while playing, but the copper pick being so stiff and having sharp-ish edges would destroy the wound strings when doing those kinds of effects. The SS one wasn't actually too bad, but the main thing that turned me off metal picks of any variety was the fact that they would tarnish in my hands while using them. I'd end up with blackened finger tips after an hour of playing, and I'd inevitably end up with black smudges showing up all over the white scratchplate. I don't recall having an issue with the sound ('zing', as you say) of these picks though. There was another pick I used to have. Might have been called the 'Dava Speed Pick' or something. It was essentially a more pointy teardrop shape, perhaps 1mm thickness, and the last 5-8mm of the tip was deliberately twisted a few degrees. I guess it was designed to make the pick tip strike the string squarely, rather than at a slight angle that most people's playing hands would naturally hold a pick at, but in my hands it felt like it was hindering more than helping.
  10. komodo

    Not Quite A Tele...

    NICE. That is going to sound amazing.
  11. It continues slowly... Following the summer break I finished slotting the fretboard. I was certain I'd cut more - but apparently not. They are not fully to depth yet, but I'll do that after radiusing And just this evening I've finally routed for the neck pickup I also planed/sanded the end of the neck tenon level with the body and will glue in a wedge under the fretboard heel after I've done a cleanup on the sanding table - that will be the last chance to do so while the surface is flat
  12. You are definitely not lacking in the determination department. SR
  13. ScottR

    Not Quite A Tele...

    I'm going with a mix of tele and not quite tele stuff: Gotoh locking tuners in my headstock, a hipshot bridge, Klein '58 PAFs, and the normal tele control plate set up and electro socket jack plate. SR
  14. ShatnersBassoon

    Is this Bubinga?

    Cheers man! Yes I did some research a while back on Tele thickness and I think the thinnest I saw was 38. The deepest route on the guitar will be 30mm (for the control cavity).
  15. komodo

    Komodo's Metal Tele

    Also, I’m trying to figure out my electronics. My plan was the three way toggle, as on an LP, one volume, one tone and two mini switches for coil cuts. Now, I’m thinking one volume for each pup and two LCR type filters ( like a Lawrence Q). It would be awkward to have the neck volume farther back though. I could also use the minis for series/parallel, and maybe some variable tone in the rear hole. Any thoughts are welcome.
  16. komodo

    Komodo's Metal Tele

    The Aquacoat has done about all it can do. I’ve applied more of the tinted lacquer to darken the edges and accentuate the “old” look. This is definitely going to be a fantasy relic rather than anything based in reality but I love the effect so far. Next is some final clear coats and turning my attention back to the neck.
  17. Andyjr1515

    Is this Bubinga?

    When I get back to the desktop (probably late on tomorrow) I'll post what I use for hatch recesses. It's the only routing job I'm perfectly comfortable with! Work out the deepest components of the build. You should be able to take 10mm off down to 40mm at the very least, I would have thought...
  18. ScottR

    Telecaster for a friend

    Very nice Goran! SR
  19. komodo

    Not Quite A Tele...

    Nice! Seems the Tele bug is going around. How are you going to deck it out hardware and electronics-wise?
  20. ShatnersBassoon

    Is this Bubinga?

    Thanks for the detailed reply! It’s actually 50mm at the moment. I figure that once all the sanding etc is done it should be down to about 48 mm, which I believe is at the upper end of Telecaster thickness. It certainly doesn’t have to be a slavish Tele design though! Hollowing out the back does appeal to me to an extent, that way it can as you say be a Thinline of sorts. Could even do an f hole. The only thing I need to find out there is how to do an accurate recess for the ‘control plates’, my previous attempt at that left a lot to be desired. I would want to use nice wood for the covers I think, cheap plastic would certainly detract from the look.
  21. Andyjr1515

    Is this Bubinga?

    It looks BEAUTIFUL. But, hmmmm, 12.2lbs... If you bear in mind that my last 6-string electric (admittedly a designed lightweight) was 5 1/4lbs playing weight! Well, in my view, it would be a tragedy to lose that top so - if this was me - I would look at a number of options, such as: How thick is it? Does it have to be that thick? You need enough meat to allow a secure neck pocket and enough depth to accommodate the pickups and electrics. So my first question would be - how thin COULD it be? Do I really want to emulate the tele slab top and back - or, as well as having it thinner - curve the top and the back? Or, you could heavily chamber from the back and cover the chambers as if they were additional control chamber covers. Ditto thinline - you could cut the thinline chamber from the back and pop a false control chamber cover over it. If ALL of that failed - but bear in mind I'm a bit of a crazy person - I would look to see if someone could slice it on a 'proper' bandsaw into three tops and pop a swamp ash back on one, then keep the other two as spares or to sell as tonewood tops Whatever, routing or not, 12lbs, in my view, is far too heavy as a starting weight...
  22. spottydog

    First full build from scratch

    The new piece is now in and sanded and looks good. Here is a pic of body after attacking it with an electric plane to thin it out prior to sanding. I had to take about half the thickness to get it correct with the neck.
  23. ShatnersBassoon

    Is this Bubinga?

    So I have cut out the wood on a bandsaw (Tele design) and the weight is...12.2 lbs. ofcourse this is before any routing, but still... I have been thinking of various ways of reducing the weight, including making it a fairly pronounced carved top (keeping the centre section where all the hardware is flat). Also a belly cut. I was thinking of a Thinline initially but it’s a pity to hide that lovely wood. Not out of the question though.
  24. Norris

    Turner Model 1 replica

    Some nice jiggery-pokery going on there!
  25. StevenStanleyBayes

    Guitar Pick Materials

    A general point is : the guitar pick material is more important than the shape and the thickness because any shape and thickness can be made with $1 file, sand paper and super glue but the material cannot be changed with the exception of some cases where some material can be washed or polished with Acetone and other chemicals. Thus, the most important thing is to fine the correct material which is very difficult because there are a lot.
  26. StevenStanleyBayes

    Guitar Pick Materials

    Important : In the explained method of reduction of friction and contact area, to sharp the tip vertically may seem contrary to the goal. True, thin picks do not have to be vertically sharpened. Thick picks best also not be sharpened for the said purposes. However, this is only good for large pick amplitudes, when the pick moves a lot away from the string when consecutive hits on a given string are played. When the amplitude between the pick and the string is tiny, <= 1mm, then, obviously, the thickness of the pick may not allow for such an amplitude. This is why I sharpen the pick vertically : to allow for a tiny amplitudes. When the hand is twisted and the pick surface is NOT parallel to the string, the vertically sharpened pick does not hit the string with larger contact area and, thus, does not slow the pick.
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