Jump to content

Entry for March 2020's Guitar Of The Month is open - ENTER HERE!

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

rhoads56

Duplicarver

Recommended Posts

Couldnt find the other thread where people showed off their duplicarvers, tried searching, maybe it was on another forum. ANYWAY, here is mine.

$300 AUD worth, which was for the stainless rod, and linear bearings. Works a treat.

IMG_2601.jpg

The router is able to be adjusted to a specific angle (as is the pin also). See the horizontal rod?? That how you adjust it. Two turns is one degree... or something like that. Great for planing surfaces when you put the roller pin into the chuck.

IMG_2602.jpg

Handbrake system.

IMG_2603.jpg

IMG_2604.jpg

Different pins for different router bits. Currently has a roller in the chuck, which is good for roughing in neck surfaces, truss rods, etc etc.

IMG_2605.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

brake is handy.

havent used it for necks or tops yet, only real simple stuff so far. Everything i do is totally custom, so i dont really even have much of a use for this :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
brake is handy.

havent used it for necks or tops yet, only real simple stuff so far. Everything i do is totally custom, so i dont really even have much of a use for this :D

what kind of stuff have you used it for?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

well, i finished it literally a few days ago, so nothing guitar related. Although it was working well enough to thickness timbers, and practise on the signs, lettering, a bowl, etc, just to see how it all worked.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's awesome. I built one too. It comes in very handy for carving tops. I don't use it for anything else. I rough carve my ttops and then do the rest by hand. Cool!

So are you getting very goo accuracy to be able to carve necks? That is great. I haven't yet tried that with mine.

EDIT: I love the bicycle brake idea. I might have to mod my carver with one of those.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In theory, I'd like to build one of those some day. In practice, I'm not likely to ever produce high enough volumes of guitars for one to be handy. I don't intend to ever get into the business. :D Still, you just never know.

Greg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just finished putting this together. Porter-Cable 1/2" router, the design is almost exactly David Myka's (right down to the brick counterweight). The table just rests on a shelf, and is attached to the wall by 3 massive heavy door hinges, so I can actually fold the table up against the wall if I want to get it out of the way. Its 1/4" plywood (the good kind) braced w/ planed-down 2x4s glued & screwed to the back. Rock solid!

Just used it for the first time today to free-hand rough out the neck heel on my bass proj...the travel along the rails is a little sticky, probably some of that residual grease they coat the rods with for shipping. Do you guys use anything special to lube the rails?

Duplicarver.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Erik, how much $$$ do you estimate you have into that? Where did you source the parts? I have had good luck with silicone spray lube for a lot of things metal.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You'll want to keep Silicone spray lube as far away from your guitar work as humanly possible - it'll make anything it gets on *hell* to finish, and once it's on wood it's virtually impossible to get rid of it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
You'll want to keep Silicone spray lube as far away from your guitar work as humanly possible - it'll make anything it gets on *hell* to finish, and once it's on wood it's virtually impossible to get rid of it.

Almost anything is going to collect the wood dust. On that I woud use wd40 (or similar...cheap) and wipe them down before and after every use. (Spray the rag) keep anything you use away from your project, Lubricant and raw wood makes for a bad finish.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The silicone spray I used would spray on wet and after a few seconds of lige "buffing" it was dry. It never collected any dust. I have heard the warnings regarding silicone and wood but as James said, almost any lube is probably bad for wood. Just use it sparingly whatever you use.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Silicone is bad news in away that oil, grease etc aren't, because it is near impossible to remove with solvents, and messes with the surface tension of finsihes, causing fisheyes and craters which are nightmarish to deal with.

Even dry, it will cause the same havok, which is why it's such an effective lubricant.

As you point out, all lubricants are to be avoided, but silicone is head and shoulders above in it's potential to be a mammoth PITA.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The router was ~$150 (already had it), the rods and mounts I found as surplus stuff at work (otherwise I'd never have done it). I got the pillow blocks directly from Thomson, about $500 just for those. Plywood, screws, etc.....I'd say slightly over $700.

The rods & pillow blocks are all 1-1/4" diameter.

I have been wiping it down before & after with WD40, its getting a bit better. I think I just didn't do the best job of removing that layer of oil/grease or whatever that was on the rods.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The router was ~$150 (already had it), the rods and mounts I found as surplus stuff at work (otherwise I'd never have done it).  I got the pillow blocks directly from Thomson, about $500 just for those.  Plywood, screws, etc.....I'd say slightly over $700.

The rods & pillow blocks are all 1-1/4" diameter.

I have been wiping it down before & after with WD40, its getting a bit better.  I think I just didn't do the best job of removing that layer of oil/grease or whatever that was on the rods.

I would have used McMaster-Carr, Pillow blocks are like 35-40 each.....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I would have used McMaster-Carr, Pillow blocks are like 35-40 each.....

The pillow block housings are roughly that much but the linear bearings are another $35-45 on top of that. But you are corret in that they can be had cheaper. You just need to watch out that you get quality bearings in a setup like this. There are several Thomson setups on the Bay' now. Erik, what are the dimensions of the rods?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I would have used McMaster-Carr, Pillow blocks are like 35-40 each.....

The pillow block housings are roughly that much but the linear bearings are another $35-45 on top of that. But you are corret in that they can be had cheaper. You just need to watch out that you get quality bearings in a setup like this. There are several Thomson setups on the Bay' now. Erik, what are the dimensions of the rods?

I understand the quality thing, I was just looking at the first carver and its made like train wheels on a track, I have seen other types that use Iron pipe for rails, Aluminum, even wood..... His looks to be a much better design... but dollar for dollar, I would want to go alot less, I would not use it enough to justify 700.00, besides I belive I could make a CNC router for that kinda money.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We had a 'DIY CNC' thread very recently, and the conclusion seemed to be that for that kind of money, you could make a 2D (not 3D) CNC machine for light-duty work such as inlay. However, the consensus was that you don't have a shred of hope of building a body-routing grade CNC machine for remotely close to that price.

Greg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
We had a 'DIY CNC' thread very recently, and the conclusion seemed to be that for that kind of money, you could make a 2D (not 3D) CNC machine for light-duty work such as inlay.  However, the consensus was that you don't have a shred of hope of building a body-routing grade CNC machine for remotely close to that price.

Greg

Sure you could the 3rd. axis would only take a small slide and ball screw (4-5" travel max), and a stepper motor, the 3 axis controller is only 150.00 (30 bucks more than the 2 axis.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Done some degree of research on this subject. Do not use any kind of lube for linear bearings. They run on delrin bushings,good for at least 20 yrs. at the frequency it will be used. :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
stop talking about it and make one to prove Greg wrong

Absolutely. Not a person on this forum would mind being proven wrong here. I'm sure lots of people would see ~$700 as a small investment for a 3D medium-duty CNC capable of doing guitar bodies and necks. :D I wouldn't mind being proven wrong at all.

Greg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

×
×
  • Create New...