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jmrentis

Project Guitar November

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I just wanted to ask and discuss Swedish's Guitar in the GOTM. I really like the guitar and it's not even the style I would normally dig. So how did the aluminum markers work out? I would like it of you could post a up close pic here of them, I saw them and thought they were very cool both the design and idea. How did you go about making them, and what was the difficulty level and process to install, compared to like regular markers which are much smaller and a lot easier I'm sure.

Anyways I just had those questions, I figured this could be for all the guitars but I guess thats the only one and I was curious. THanks for your time. Good luck in the GOTM. J

Edit: Also anyone else that has done similar work, I would like to know your feelings on them.

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Glad you liked the guitar, Jason. Here’s another picture.

Fretmarkerscloseup3.jpg

The markers are quite simple to do, but requires a little more work than ordinary dots. First you need to prepare your fret board like you normally would, cut fret slots and so on. Some of you might know by now that I like to bind the fret board with a strip of the same wood for an sophisticated, “invisible” binding. This also helps to prevent tearing in the following steps. I also prefer to do the next steps on a non-radiused board.

- I use an 8mm aluminium rod, but you can use plastic, contrasting wood or what ever you like. Get a drill the same size.

- Chuck the drill in your pillar drill. And yeas, it will be much easier with a pillar drill.

- Clamp a simple fence made of hardwood flat to the working area of your pillar drill (whatever that’s called) so that the drill goes a little less than 1 mm into the fence. The drill should just slightly enter the fence. Drill through the fence

- Push the fret board hard against the fence and align the drill to where you want the marker and drill all the way through.

- Cut the rod to lengths to match the board and glue the pieces into the open sided holes you made using CA, epoxy or similar.

- File the insert flush to the wood and continue as on an ordinary fret board

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Thanks for the mini-tutorial! I really do like those markers a lot. I might wait until I get a little better, but I definately would like to try them eventually, I think they're cool and would add a lot to many guitars. I have thought a lot about how to make some fret markers different from the dots, I couldn't think of much, there was one other idea that came up here on a project guitar with little lines stretching the length of the fret, I thought those were cool too, I forget who did that, whoever it was post it here maybe.

Anyways thanks for sharing that, it's a killer guitar and I wish you luck in the GOTM. After looking at them I have one question, would matching headstock inlay or fretboard inlay be possible? I don't know much of working with metals, I know Russ has and you, so I figured you guys would know. I believe I have seen aluminum inlays but I could be mistaken. Again thanks for sharing and for the idea, it's a very cool feature and is different. Later. J

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Sure, you could do aluminium inlays. I haven’t done it myself, but I’ve seen it done, and I think that it actually would be easier than MOP. I’ve done a few MOP inlays, including one tree-of-life, and I know that aluminium is much easier to cut and grind than MOP. Just remember to go slow, or the aluminium will stick to files, grinder and so on, almost like plastic that melt from cutting with to high speed.

I remember those markers you are thinking of. Did a search but couldn’t find the thread. They looked KILLER. Much more work thou…

HMMM, thinking of it, maybe I should do an aluminium inlay for the next project.

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Aluminum is a dream to work on compared to any other metal. The only draw back I see with them is "oxidation" or the tendency to turn whitish or pale with time!

I liked this guitar as Mattias (sneaky dude) about time he brings a guitar up here!

I got to get on my toes once I get my next one up, with the standards as high as they have gotten in the last months it is crazy to come up with a simple design.

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I will definately attempt to do some aluminum on the next project.

There is a couple more guitars up there and all I can say is wow! The tele is sweet and different which I like to see when I see teles, there are just so many made, and so many made to what they were originally built like that seeing one that has some unique features is always a plus in my eyes, very cool guitar.

And mattias wow, I have seen a bunch of your posts recently and I knew from the help and info you had that you could more than likely build some killer stuff and that guitars proved it. That inlay is sweet and to me is cool because it throws the look of the bookmatch off, without directly covering it, if that makes sense. You know it's bookmatched but you don't easily see that join in the figure or as a joint, and that inlay doesn't even cover the joint, pretty cool to me. I like the faux binding and matching pickup rings a lot too, along with a very nice looking headstock. And one last thing I liked a lot was the binded cavity cover, I though that was a nice touch, it somewhat matches the front such as the binding but also keeps the grain pattern from the cover which seems difficult but always looks good in my opinion.

So congrats to all so far, it's going to be a good comp. this month I think. All 3 so far look really nice, so thanks for sharing those with us, as tony the tiger would say "They're Great!" J

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Aluminum is a dream to work on compared to any other metal. The only draw back I see with them is "oxidation" or the tendency to turn whitish or pale with time!

I have had no problem with oxidation. Aluminium is actually very immune against oxidation in normal use. The slight sheen you see if looking at polished, unfinished aluminium is actually a very thin “skin” of oxide that is formed within a few seconds after the freshly cut surface is exposed to air. So there is no more oxidation unless you expose the aluminium to stronger alkaline, like industrial detergents or washing powder etc. Those chemicals break down the thin oxide skin, and you get the whitish look. Longer exposure will almost make the aluminium “rot”!!

But as I said, I have had no problem at all

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