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gtrmn768

How To Route Without A Router

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I have a dremel with router bits and the cutting attachment base, i use this to route however, i feel that the dremel sucks and doesnt cut out enough surface area in one cut, anybody have any ideas on how to remove masses of wood for chambering a guitar without a real router or dremel?'

I've been thinking of calling a local cabinet maker and borrowing his router.

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I've used those little Dremel router bits in a drill press before, but only for small jobs when I didn't feel like breaking out the router.

For what you want to do, I really think a router is your best bet.

Much quicker and much more precise than any alternative that I can think of. :D

Edited by Dino

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Mark out the areas, then use a forstner bit in a drill press or hand drill. Just be careful, you want to make sure you cut to the right depth. Then clean up with chisels, file, rasps, sandpaper, etc.

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Mark out the areas, then use a forstner bit in a drill press or hand drill. Just be careful, you want to make sure you cut to the right depth. Then clean up with chisels, file, rasps, sandpaper, etc.

Dude, no offense but that is an incredible amount of work and will no doubt look like ass. :D

Edited by Dino

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Mark out the areas, then use a forstner bit in a drill press or hand drill. Just be careful, you want to make sure you cut to the right depth. Then clean up with chisels, file, rasps, sandpaper, etc.

+1

I use forstber bits to remove the bulk of the wood when I am getting ready to route large amounts of wood. With good sharp chisels you should be able to clean it up pretty well, and finish with sandpaper or other tools as Southpa mentioned.

Peace,Rich

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Mark out the areas, then use a forstner bit in a drill press or hand drill. Just be careful, you want to make sure you cut to the right depth. Then clean up with chisels, file, rasps, sandpaper, etc.

Dude, no offense but that is an incredible amount of work and will no doubt look like ass. B)

I guess your chisels aren't "Scary Sharp" then, eh? :D . I agree with fry and southpa, a forstner bit and chisel is the way to go sans router. Well, that or a 3 axis machining center with a <3/8" endmill...but I suppose that's out of the question as well. :D

peace,

russ

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Forstners = great. Saves a LOT of wear and tear on router bits, and are always my first stop when it comes to chambering, pocketing, etc. Chisels are great too, but I prefer to use them to fine tune shapes, work on precise details, not hog out massive amounts of wood.

Seriously though, buy a router. Even a cheap one is better than none at all, although I strongly reccomend saving up for (f'r instance) a refurbished Porter Cable 690 on eBay, if you're stateside.

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Mark out the areas, then use a forstner bit in a drill press or hand drill. Just be careful, you want to make sure you cut to the right depth. Then clean up with chisels, file, rasps, sandpaper, etc.

+ whatever number we're up to. :D

Definitely a good way to go - not ideal but a good alternative.

Regards,

Rob

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Mark out the areas, then use a forstner bit in a drill press or hand drill. Just be careful, you want to make sure you cut to the right depth. Then clean up with chisels, file, rasps, sandpaper, etc.

Dude, no offense but that is an incredible amount of work and will no doubt look like ass. :D

No way man, Forstner bits will save you an incredible amount of time. Granted this was free-handed with a router, it would have dulled my router bit(s) up a fair amount doing all of that with a single bit. I highly recommend it if you have a drill or drill press.

th_Project706.jpgth_Project711.jpg

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I'm a strong believer that "the proper tool for the proper job" makes all the difference in the world.

Besides ... routers aren't a real big investment.

Edited by mdismuke

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Trace out the neck heel onto a piece of pine and go at it with a chisel. If you can fit the neck in the piece of pine and replicate it onto your guitar, then you're in business!

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Mark out the areas, then use a forstner bit in a drill press or hand drill. Just be careful, you want to make sure you cut to the right depth. Then clean up with chisels, file, rasps, sandpaper, etc.

Dude, no offense but that is an incredible amount of work and will no doubt look like ass. :D

definately I wouldn't go all the way with the hand tools IF I have a router available, but there is no reason it will look bad if you are half way decent at wood working!

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Well here it is so far, first off the work area and the mess, then various halves of the body, the top piece is covered in tape to protect the nice looking flames and save me a headache later. The top is the piece with the hunk of wood where the pickups will be, i figure no sense in cutting that all out, I will just drill a series of holes and nock it out when i mount the pickguard and pickups and clean up the mess with a file. The top I drilled and then chiseled and is more smooth and thinner than the back, which was all chisels, once the dremel gets back from a road trip to Dremel Hq in Wisconsin i will sand it all down, then glue her together, then again dremel the cutaways for prime smoothness, then belt sand the rim, etc. fit everything meaure for the bridge, do the ferules.... then oil it :D i doubt i want to stain it, to darken it to match the toroise pickguard, i think the oil will darken enough, Ill test some scrap first with both,

DSC00537.jpg

http://i71.photobucket.com/albums/i137/gtrmn768/DSC00538.jpg

http://i71.photobucket.com/albums/i137/gtr...rprocess001.jpg

http://i71.photobucket.com/albums/i137/gtr...rprocess003.jpg

http://i71.photobucket.com/albums/i137/gtr...rprocess002.jpg

http://i71.photobucket.com/albums/i137/gtr...rprocess004.jpg

http://i71.photobucket.com/albums/i137/gtr...rprocess005.jpg

Heres the maple MM neck that is going on it, it's BIRDSEYE!!!!!! I'm thinking this is the MAPLE-Caster :D , ah so corny

http://i71.photobucket.com/albums/i137/gtr...rprocess006.jpg

http://i71.photobucket.com/albums/i137/gtr...rprocess007.jpg

http://i71.photobucket.com/albums/i137/gtr...rprocess008.jpg

as far as that pocket goes im thinking ruff it off with chisels leave myseld say 1/10th of an inch or a small bit then ruff that with the sanders on the dremel?

or wait till the dremel returns put on a bit and take it thin layer by thin layer until its down low enough?

i just forgot i ordered a varitone from BigD, it will go between the two knobs i suppose, i dont need the vol. knob for swails i gots me an Ernie Ball

Please read the image posting rules before posting any more images. You are allowed one pic per post, the rest should be links or thumbnails. I have modfied your post.

Edited by Setch

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A few helpful tips:

Buy a square. This tool is vital to measuring straight lines from the start of the build, it is definitely required when chambering bodies.

Use a pencil. Sharpee's and other marker types can bleed thru wood, which is not always a problem if you're routing it all out anyways, but the point is to be able to erase or sand your mistakes out until you get the design drawn out correctly. Simply put, more lines = more confusion.

Buy a larger bit, specifically a Forstner bit. It drills flat and is made to cut wood fast and efficiently. It does not look like you're using a very large bit to drill holes. Why drill 500 times with a 1/4" bit in 2 hours, when you can drill 30 times with a 1" bit in 10 minutes? Forstner bits are not expensive. There may not always be a correct tool for the job, but there is always the most practical.

Use double stick tape or clamps with something that has a straight edge. This will ensure a straighter line when chiseling, it may help you on the neck pocket.

Use a ruler, frequently. Guessing measurements will yield poor results. Try measuring every 3/8" or 1/2" from the edge of the body to the inside and marking a dot every few inches around the body, then connect the lines for a nice and consistent chamber line.

Be careful with the top. I have no idea what thickness it is, but after you glue the top onto the body and get it shaped to size you may crack it when chiseling the pickup area. There is no wood backing the pickup area, so be extremely careful if you're going to use a chisel there. Infact, I wouldn't even recommend using a chisel for the pickups area. Just drill the correct size holes and finish it off with a drum sander attachment on the dremel.

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thanks for the tips, as far as the top goes yes i am going to do what you said and drill then dremel, if it is ruff i could care less its hidden 98.9% of the guitars life, so i will most likely sand it smooth, OCD :D

and yes i used the biggest bit i had didnt feel like a trip to the local store yesterday,

for the neck pocket i am going to use a real tiny bit to drill down the perimeter, leaving space to expand the pocket with the dremel, then lay my laser level on there to get me aline across the cavity then measure every bit of depth, adjust until it is even.

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