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which auto cad do i need to set up basic drawings of guitar? more specifically what is the best year?

I downloaded deltacad I think it is good but that is my opinion. The price to buy it is like $35.

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which auto cad do i need to set up basic drawings of guitar? more specifically what is the best year?

I have 2008, but anything is good really.

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which auto cad do i need to set up basic drawings of guitar? more specifically what is the best year?

I have 2008, but anything is good really.

what is the best way for drawing a guitar plan from a completed guitar picture?

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Do a quick search, You will find this exact topic covered with respoces from people who use different software to do what you want to do.

Personally, Autocad 2008 because that is what I am used to using. There are sevral reasonably priced 2-D drafting apps out there that do a fine job, and have most of the tools that make drafting painless.

Peace,Rich

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Do a quick search, You will find this exact topic covered with respoces from people who use different software to do what you want to do.

Personally, Autocad 2008 because that is what I am used to using. There are sevral reasonably priced 2-D drafting apps out there that do a fine job, and have most of the tools that make drafting painless.

Peace,Rich

i just got 2008 a couple of days ago-no experience on it tho

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Do a quick search, You will find this exact topic covered with respoces from people who use different software to do what you want to do.

Personally, Autocad 2008 because that is what I am used to using. There are sevral reasonably priced 2-D drafting apps out there that do a fine job, and have most of the tools that make drafting painless.

Peace,Rich

i just got 2008 a couple of days ago-no experience on it tho

If you are planning to use a picture to get the basic shape of a guitar. Be sure you get as clean of a straight on angle as you can(this will get you pretty close to accurate, but not perfect). Verify several actual dimensions on the guitar(say upper, lower bout, waist, and maybe overall length). After you insert the picture into your model space, use the scale command. When you use the scale command select the object(the picture), then select your base point (0,0 or wherever you choose), then choose R (reference), it will prompt you for two points (select two points you can confirm with an actual dimension from the instrument), then it will ask you to give it that value, and it will scale the picture to that size. After you have done that use your dimension or distance tool to confirm the points that you can confirm with actual dimensions are close to the size of the picture(post scaling). If it is close enough, use your spline and or polyline commands to trace around the shape of the body, headstock or what have you. Don't attempt to use this picture to define your neck length or widths, not your nut width, bridge placement, bridge size, string spacing, tuner placement, fret positions and so forth. For all of these critical placements you will want to draw them using actual values for exact placement and spacing.

Learn to use your auto snaps, ortho, copy selection, fillet, and mirror commands. These are all great tools to help you draw accurately. When drafting extend and trim commands can be handy also. Never draw things pretty close, use your snaps and input actual distances and measures (well unless you are playing with the shape of a body or something that is not critical).

When you draft a guitar, be sure you draw at least a top plan view a bottom plan view, and a profile or side view. It is handy to block parts that you have draw(such as tuners, bridges, knobs, components) so that you can use them again in other drawings, as well as move them more easily in your drawings when making adjustments. When you draft these parts draft with a high degree of accuracy(because you will use them over and over, as time goes on).

Peace,Rich

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Do a quick search, You will find this exact topic covered with respoces from people who use different software to do what you want to do.

Personally, Autocad 2008 because that is what I am used to using. There are sevral reasonably priced 2-D drafting apps out there that do a fine job, and have most of the tools that make drafting painless.

Peace,Rich

i just got 2008 a couple of days ago-no experience on it tho

If you are planning to use a picture to get the basic shape of a guitar. Be sure you get as clean of a straight on angle as you can(this will get you pretty close to accurate, but not perfect). Verify several actual dimensions on the guitar(say upper, lower bout, waist, and maybe overall length). After you insert the picture into your model space, use the scale command. When you use the scale command select the object(the picture), then select your base point (0,0 or wherever you choose), then choose R (reference), it will prompt you for two points (select two points you can confirm with an actual dimension from the instrument), then it will ask you to give it that value, and it will scale the picture to that size. After you have done that use your dimension or distance tool to confirm the points that you can confirm with actual dimensions are close to the size of the picture(post scaling). If it is close enough, use your spline and or polyline commands to trace around the shape of the body, headstock or what have you. Don't attempt to use this picture to define your neck length or widths, not your nut width, bridge placement, bridge size, string spacing, tuner placement, fret positions and so forth. For all of these critical placements you will want to draw them using actual values for exact placement and spacing.

Learn to use your auto snaps, ortho, copy selection, fillet, and mirror commands. These are all great tools to help you draw accurately. When drafting extend and trim commands can be handy also. Never draw things pretty close, use your snaps and input actual distances and measures (well unless you are playing with the shape of a body or something that is not critical).

When you draft a guitar, be sure you draw at least a top plan view a bottom plan view, and a profile or side view. It is handy to block parts that you have draw(such as tuners, bridges, knobs, components) so that you can use them again in other drawings, as well as move them more easily in your drawings when making adjustments. When you draft these parts draft with a high degree of accuracy(because you will use them over and over, as time goes on).

Peace,Rich

thank man

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i find it easier when tracing something to just load the image in trace it then scale the vector items they are usualy much easier to work with than trying to get some pic to the right scale when you can't even snap to it.

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i find it easier when tracing something to just load the image in trace it then scale the vector items they are usualy much easier to work with than trying to get some pic to the right scale when you can't even snap to it.

Depends on the software you use, and the pic your working with. You get a lot of odd artifacts during conversions(especially if the pic is marginal), and your going to do better to use a plines and splines to give you better control of your lines quite often. I actually prefer to see the picture, as I can try to adjust for odd angles or shadowing. Either way it is not an exacting science for sure, your just trying to grab something very close to the shape, and scale to know specs usually. You never rely on a picture or tracing for critical parts and their placement. Either way you could do a quick vector conversion, and import the image for reference and use them both to create your tracing.

P.S. When I scale an image. I like to draw lines that reflect points I will use spec information to scale to. Then when I scale to a reference, those lines become the reference and I have my snaps(really you only scale to one reference so it is not a big deal).

Peace,Rich

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Forget 2D dude, go 3D, Autodesk Inventor. That's what I use. You can even texture your virtual wood. Go here;

http://usa.autodesk.com/adsk/servlet/mform...amp;id=11384226

and fill out the form. Get the 30 day trial. Once you go 3D, 2D will seem so....well, 2D. Besides, you can export all your models to 2D dwg with Inventor, so you get the best of both worlds. If you need more info, PM me.

Cheers

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i find it easier when tracing something to just load the image in trace it then scale the vector items they are usualy much easier to work with than trying to get some pic to the right scale when you can't even snap to it.

Depends on the software you use, and the pic your working with. You get a lot of odd artifacts during conversions(especially if the pic is marginal), and your going to do better to use a plines and splines to give you better control of your lines quite often. I actually prefer to see the picture, as I can try to adjust for odd angles or shadowing. Either way it is not an exacting science for sure, your just trying to grab something very close to the shape, and scale to know specs usually. You never rely on a picture or tracing for critical parts and their placement. Either way you could do a quick vector conversion, and import the image for reference and use them both to create your tracing.

P.S. When I scale an image. I like to draw lines that reflect points I will use spec information to scale to. Then when I scale to a reference, those lines become the reference and I have my snaps(really you only scale to one reference so it is not a big deal).

Peace,Rich

yeah that convert from a image to vector is crap your i don't ever use it but most of the time when i am tracing something its pretty noncritical like a logo or something.

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Forget 2D dude, go 3D, Autodesk Inventor. That's what I use. You can even texture your virtual wood. Go here;

http://usa.autodesk.com/adsk/servlet/mform...amp;id=11384226

and fill out the form. Get the 30 day trial. Once you go 3D, 2D will seem so....well, 2D. Besides, you can export all your models to 2D dwg with Inventor, so you get the best of both worlds. If you need more info, PM me.

Cheers

I don't really use a full 3-D model for the dimensions, and patterns I need for jigs and such. Are you saying 3D is more useful for the tooling you use? or you just like rendering?

Most of the work I do with CAD is related to construction documents and BIM modeling. So I don't have a lot of experience with tool pathing or presentation rendering.

Rich

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I use Rhino, but for just tracing a picture and messing with the 2D outline of a body for example, I often just use photoshop. By copying and pasting parts of the image, you can reshape with size, skew, perspective and such. I put a 1" grid over the image (show grid) and just draw 1" squares on my wood to transfer by eye.

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