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avengers63

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I inherited a big TV last year. We did some major re-arranging and now the TV is on a chincy little MDF corner unit. I've been giving serious consideration to making a nice big corner unit from poplar and staining it to match the rest of the furniture. Unless it's for a drawer/box bottom or for the back of a unit, I just can't bring myself to even consider using ply for anything going in the main rooms.

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This will be in my bedroom and is replacing the current "table + file cabinet" combo that has held my tv for the last 5 years. You know the old saying about how the cobbler's kids have no shoes..... it would appear there's some catching up for me to do around the house. The plywood is plentiful right now - so it beats nothing. Not sure how things are going up there, but all wood - even cheap plywood - has gotten stupid in pricing here lately. That little cherry ply bass I just built had a total wood materials cost of $40. To build it again today be around $62 just for the plywood cost increase. 8/4 solid cherry is a pipe dream.

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All the better reason to look at poplar. Next to pine, poplar is the cheapest wood available, coming in >$3.00/BF in most places. Considering how well it stains & takes paint, that'd be my wood of choice for something big. Cherry & Walnut are beautiful, but with poplar being 1/3 the cost and easily stainable, it's really a no-brainer in my book.

Then again, a light wood used on a big piece would really brighten up the room, so why stain it at all? It wouldn't be all that expensive to trim it in real cherry, walnut, or some other dark wood. Hmmmmm..... :D

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Funny you say that..... my wife was just commenting on how she thought I should start making more out of "maple" which means light, unstained woods or birch ply. I'm sure poplar would work just fine.

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I'm a comic book junkie. For more than 25 years, I've read my comics before going to bed. They've always sat in a pile or stacked in an upturned comic box. When the box was full, I'd file them away in their proper place.

SWMBO doesn't like the looks of this in out bedroom. I can't say that I blame her. So....

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Here are the plans I came up with. The idea is to have a top shelf to hold a drink or lamp, just like a regular nightstand. There will be an exposed 4" shelf in which the books in cue to be read will sit. Behind the door will be a space that will fit a bagged & boarded comic with a little room to spare. At the bottom, behind the door, will be a

3" shelf to house the bags & boards. The intent is to read them, then put them in the cabinet, just like I did with the box.

I recently cam into a big pile of walnut... for $2.00/BF!!!!! Some of it was able to be planed to 1/2", which is exactly what I wanted for this project.

The basic dimensions of the stand/cabinet is 28" tall, 12" deep, and 8.5" wide. For perspective, the door itself is 17".

I'm contemplating making the door from canarywood or goncalo alves, possibly framed in walnut. I wanted the door to be some kind of contrasting figured exotic wood, but all of my exotics are dark (cocobolo, chechen, bocote), so my choices are limited.

Here's what I have so far...

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Everything except the door & back are cut, "biscuted", and sanded to 220. Test fit went OK, so were on to the finishing stage.

Gotta tape it off first...

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...then we slather it in water-based ploy. I hadn't tried the water-based yet, so I figured to give it a shot. It costs about 60% more than thinner based, but cleanup is SO much cheaper and easier.

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FWIW: I got the canarywood for the door resawn, glued, and planed down to just under 1/2". It contrasts nicely with the walnut and the grain will add some life to the piece.

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wip09.jpg

There's a lot of cleaning up to do, but the frame & shelves are finished & assembled.

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1/4" Oak plywood for the back. I had to hit it with walnut stain because we're **** like that.

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I had to cut new canarywood for the door because I can't measure. Tonight the door will get glued up, tomorrow it gets planed down.

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wip01.jpg

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I'm starting work on the pair of end tables for the family room. I'll be using the same basic pattern as the learning project I did, but with less metal. I'll still be using the pocket screws, but to re-enforce, not to be the main support. I'm not up to mortise joints yet, but I AM using biscuits. I might go so far as to try some dados in grooves, but really aren't they virtually the same as a mortise?

So anyway, the bulk of the table will be sapele. The top will be 2" strips of zebrawood that are being slip-matched. The bottom shelf will be plywood with a sapele veneer on top.

I probably won't make any more progress until Monday or Tuesday, but at least I got the ball rolling.

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I knocked out a pair of these a couple of weeks ago. The woods are American redwood and African white limba. The bottom is 1/4" oak plywood I finished them with three coats of water-based poly, then buffed them out with steel wool.

I hadn't made a box in a while. I was spending time with other woodworking projects. While these are a long way from perfect and a couple of mistakes were made along the way, these are a dang sight better than my last efforts. It seems that I'm finally getting past the initial learning curve. :D

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All done. :D

There are a number of changes that could have been made to improve the cabinet structurally. Indeed, were this made for anyone other than myself, I'd use dado channels and lap joints instead of biscuits and butt joints. I'd change the hinges as well to some sort of hidden variety.

That being said, it all came together relatively painlessly. The construction choices I made were intentional considering this is my first piece wholly designed and constructed by myself. I wanted to keep it easy yet functional. Mission accomplished!

The walnut and canary have a striking contrast I am very pleased with. I think the imperfections in the walnut adds a great deal of character to the cabinet.

I'd appreciate any and all comments you might have to offer.

rear

inside 1

inside 2

top

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Very nice John. Clean, simple lines and handle ... I like it. Nice contrasts too ... and I assume they work well for your decor.

But the hinges aren't working for me. I'd have preferred they were hidden ... or perhaps more of a decorative feature.

Nahhh ... definitely hidden.

:D

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Yea... I'm not overly pleased with the hinges either. You're right - they mess with the clean look of the face. I'd have preferred they be inside or pin-style, but this is what the budget allowed me. Maybe sometime in the future I'll be able to switch them out. On the good side, SWMBO & I are the only ones who'll ever see it, so if we can live with it...

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wip03.jpg

Progress has been pretty slow. I've been sidetracked with making 3 guitars at the same time, and that's taken most of my efforts.

I did manage to get the zebrawood tops glued together. If I didn't mention it before, they're slip-matched. With the solid tops, I'm changing the design to breadboard ends. I found a GREAT tutorial in a magazine, so there are no worries there.

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I made a quick chessboard this weekend to try out the new veneer vacuum bag system. It is 1/8" maple and black walnut, on a maple ply base with maple and bocote aprons. Satin poly finish. sanded to 1200 and buffed.

MK

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I presume you bought the board face pre-assembled as a veneer? Regardless, it looks nice. I've been wanting to make one for a while, along with a scroll-sawn chess set. Some day...

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I presume you bought the board face pre-assembled as a veneer? Regardless, it looks nice. I've been wanting to make one for a while, along with a scroll-sawn chess set. Some day...

No I made the face as well :D

It's actually very easy using the strip method.

MK

Edited by MiKro

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I only know this because I saw it on TV (David Marks). It goes something like this:

Joint a dark and a light piece and glue them up so you have a long piece (slightly longer than the length of the chess board)that's half dark and half light, each stripe being the width of one chess board square.

Cut into four slices with a band saw, then thickness sand the four slices. Glue them up so that you have a chess board that's striped instead of checkered.

Cut into strips the width of the squares, so now you have eight strips of alternating squares.

Flip four of them around and reassemble to get the checkered pattern.

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I knew that part - woodwhisperer.com

I was meaning how did he manage to get two pieces - light & dark - square, jointed, and glue ready - exactly the same size. If they're not square & perfectly identical, the whole thing won't square-up when you're making the board.

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okay. I'll do a write up with pics, the strip method. Give me a day or so. :D

It really is easy!! Just need to make sure your saw is NUT on from a parallel standpoint on ripping. Otherwise it will be off.

MK

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I only know this because I saw it on TV (David Marks). It goes something like this:

Joint a dark and a light piece and glue them up so you have a long piece (slightly longer than the length of the chess board)that's half dark and half light, each stripe being the width of one chess board square.

Cut into four slices with a band saw, then thickness sand the four slices. Glue them up so that you have a chess board that's striped instead of checkered.

Cut into strips the width of the squares, so now you have eight strips of alternating squares.

Flip four of them around and reassemble to get the checkered pattern.

DO NOT use a bandsaw. as it is not a clean cut to allow a good glue joint. NO NO NO. need a good saw blade on your table saw that is glue joint capable. Freud, Forrest and others have these. They are called glueline rip blades.

MK

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I was just referring to the slicing the thing up thickness-wise into four dark-and-light pieces, with the bandsaw. Just the way I saw it done.

He glued up a dark piece and a light piece, then sliced the resulting piece into four thin slices that would make up the board.

I haven't done it myself, just describing how I saw it done once (and only on TV at that).

Looking forward to your pics!

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I was just referring to the slicing the thing up thickness-wise into four dark-and-light pieces, with the bandsaw. Just the way I saw it done.

He glued up a dark piece and a light piece, then sliced the resulting piece into four thin slices that would make up the board.

I haven't done it myself, just describing how I saw it done once (and only on TV at that).

Looking forward to your pics!

No Problem, I'll try and work up a concise way of doing this, as it really is easy once you see it or do it. It does require clean, straight, accurate cuts though.

MK

Edited by MiKro

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Here's a rundown on the process. I'm going to try and make a video if I can :D

MK

The strip method is cutting 4 strips of each color at the width of the chosen square size. Make these at least 1-1/4" longer than the actual size of the total board to allow for the saw kerf waste on the next step. Glue them up, in alternating pattern length wise. Then rotate this board 90 degrees and cut strips the same width as in the first step. Now, rotate from top to bottom every other new strip and glue it up. Now you have a checkerboard pattern. if done correctly is square ( some minor trimming now to remove excess may be required on each edge to get the outside squares to the correct size). I do that so I can get a true final cut edge on each side and sneak up on the final dimension.

I sometimes will add 1/4" on the outer strips on the first step. as well as add 1/2" to the length. also when cutting the second set of strips cut 2 that are 1/4" wider as well. These 2 wider pieces will get glued to the outside positions again. This will allow the outer squares to be 1/4" larger on the outside only all around. With this I, can make a dadoed apron (1/4" deep dado, thickness of the board), similar to a Raised panel door that allows the board to be captured on the apron frame and have a raised border around the chess board.

Here's a quick drawing I made to help you visualize it

chb10.jpg

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BTW,

I'm still working on that fireplace surround. LOL.

I know I said I'd get it done by Christmas. I just didn't say which one.

I got to making the bookcase last week. My wife is already filling it. Go Figure. Now I have to start making the trim.

MK

bkcs1.jpg

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