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RAI6

Automatic Shut-off Table Saw

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Hrm - router table, maybe.

But if you could stop the bit in a handheld router as fast as they stop that blade, it'd spin the whole thing right out of your hand, I'd imagine. Like the way a router without soft start wants to torque out of your grip when it goes up to full speed immediatly (even worse with a large diameter bit.)

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Exactly - although it would be another case of "i'd prefer to be thwacked by the airbag than..." :-D

I can only imagine the day when routers are given artificial intelligence to prevent or mitigate the results of accidents, and you end up buying one with a personality like Bender who insults your work and insists on smoking cigars near your workpieces (and flammable dust/chippings).

Has anyone used/bought one of these tables?

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How about a drill press that shuts off the second the damn chuck starts to fall out ! Oh yeah, probably only needed on the cheap imports, then hard telling what the "safety feature" would really end up doing.

Anyone know of anybody getting their hand cut by a table-saw blade when using adequate sized push sticks ?

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Push sticks are sensible, but I prefer to be able to apply solid downpressure on the workpiece to the bed and the fence as well as the forward momentum towards the blade. I only use push sticks for the thickness planer to be fair.

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Exactly - although it would be another case of "i'd prefer to be thwacked by the airbag than..." :-D

I can only imagine the day when routers are given artificial intelligence to prevent or mitigate the results of accidents, and you end up buying one with a personality like Bender who insults your work and insists on smoking cigars near your workpieces (and flammable dust/chippings).

Has anyone used/bought one of these tables?

I've used the cabinet saw version and it's a great saw I hate having to use mine compared to the sawstop not just because of the safety feature.

How about a drill press that shuts off the second the damn chuck starts to fall out ! Oh yeah, probably only needed on the cheap imports, then hard telling what the "safety feature" would really end up doing.

Anyone know of anybody getting their hand cut by a table-saw blade when using adequate sized push sticks ?

I've only had the chuck fall out of my drill press once and I've had it for 5 or 6 years and that was right after I let my brother use it to drill hole in some metal and the table too :D. It's the cheapest Delta there is.

My dad said he was using push sticks when he cut off half his thumb. His push sticks are good sized too.

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I've only had the chuck fall out of my drill press once and I've had it for 5 or 6 years and that was right after I let my brother use it to drill hole in some metal and the table too :D. It's the cheapest Delta there is.

Yeah, when something only happens every 5 years, it's just not worth creating a safety feature for it. Unlike a running table saw blade which we always touch with our hand every few months.

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I think alot of the time it is just carelessness that results in these accidents...I work with much more dangerous tools in my line of work and thankfully I still have all of my fingers....

I WAS using a miter saw on aluminum once and it rolled out of my hand,pulling my left hand toward the blade...happens quick,but all I lost that time was a quarter sized piece of thumb skin...the whole thing happened because the blade lost a tooth mid cut and bound on the aluminum.

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I know everyone here thinks they're super careful, and a bad accident could never happen to them, but let's be honest. We've all had close calls, which are usually followed by the statement "damn, that was stupid. what was i thinking?" If you know enough woodworkers, chances are you know someone that's had a nasty encounter with a tool. Chances are they were doing something stupid. Chances are they were an experienced woodworker at the time, and they knew better. Almost all of us have operated our machines in a unsafe manner before. It only takes a little bit of bad luck to turn that into a nasty accident. To me, the SawStop is some comforting insurance, but the tool that scares me the most is still the shaper.

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I know one of the top cabinet makers in the country and he just cut half of his thumb off on a bandsaw (well left a little bit of skin holding it on). I think if you happen to use things tolls for all of your life then at some point your quite likely to do yourself a mischief sooner or later.

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I remember somebody mentioning this or something similar on here or somewhere:

"When you stop being scared using X power tool, turn it off and think a little harder!"

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Yeah, I feel that way about my router too. I kind of look at it for a few seconds before I approach it... make sure it's not up to something.

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A tool that scares the crap out of me pretty much every time I use it, is a Dremel with a toothed saw blade bit on it.

I try not to mess around with it too long, 'cause I think maybe any minute, the Devil is going to peek around the corner and think " AH HA, what do we have here ? "

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"I know everyone here thinks they're super careful, and a bad accident could never happen to them, but let's be honest. We've all had close calls, which are usually followed by the statement "damn, that was stupid. what was i thinking?""

Yep, just about lost my thumb at the tablesaw. DON'T TRY CUTTING FROM THE BACK OF THE SAW!!! Seemed like a good idea at the time. In hindsight, not so much.

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Yeah, I feel that way about my router too. I kind of look at it for a few seconds before I approach it... make sure it's not up to something.

It certainly is a sneaky little bastard! Gotta keep 'em their place. Table saws, on the other hand, want to kill you and they don't try to hide it. I can just see the saliva dripping off the blade.....

CMA

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I once had a table saw make a pact with a piece of wood to trip me as I was walking through my garage drunk once....tripped and hit my chin on the table edge...

But I got it back...I used it to cut a bunch of wood with nails in it...had it screaming for mercy..

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This seems like a great system, and personally I think it's worth the money to save fingers. Especially for people like us, who build and play instruments. If a furniture maker cuts a finger off on a table saw, he can still sit on a chair he made. If we lose a finger or more, we may not be able to use our creations at all. If I had the money, I would buy one of those saws in a heartbeat.

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Me too. If I ever decide to replace my current table saw that I never really use, I'll spend the extra money on a SawStop.

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This seems like a great system, and personally I think it's worth the money to save fingers. Especially for people like us, who build and play instruments. If a furniture maker cuts a finger off on a table saw, he can still sit on a chair he made. If we lose a finger or more, we may not be able to use our creations at all. If I had the money, I would buy one of those saws in a heartbeat.

Why can I imagine that in a parallel universe, the members of the Project Cabinet forum are discussing how the saw-stop has saved them many a time from cutting off half of their ass through accidents? Hahahahahahaha.

In my minds eye, i'm imagining the guy in the video pulling his jeans down to expose his ass and budging back onto the table whilst the anchor dude explains the high speed camera and lighting stuff.

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I teach at the machine shop on our campus and we have one of these, which is a GREAT call around rookie shop users (and veterans too, mind you). The shop has, historically, lost 2 fingers on a table saw and now that's not a concern any longer.

It has, in the last 2 years since it was installed, been triggered twice.

1. Student cutting aluminum/metallic backed acrylic (skin on metal = skin to the machine)

2. Student cutting VERY green wood. (that is, so green when we put it in a vise later and put mild pressure on it the wood was literally dripping out the end grain).

3. Student touching side of saw while carelessly replacing hands for a thiiiiiin cut. Probably wouldn't have chopped of a finger since it was away from the teeth... but better safe than sorry.

Replacing the safety unit is simple, but about $250! Add the $150 for a nice blade too (since it ruins both) and its expensive upkeep. not as expensive as sewing a thumb back on though!

In other news, it is also a very nice saw. Well designed, solid construction, lots of accessories, accurate cutting, and easily maintained.

Whenever it's time for me to build up my own shop, in house, where there may be children running around (in the distant future) this will be a no-brainer:

Sawstop for me!

-Dave

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I know everyone here thinks they're super careful, and a bad accident could never happen to them, but let's be honest. We've all had close calls, which are usually followed by the statement "damn, that was stupid.

Wow, I guess I was just tempting fate with that post. I did something really stupid yesterday. I was in a bit of a hurry (standard opening line for these kind of stories) to drill some holes with the drill press. While I was tightening the chuck, I reached up with my other hand to turn on the light. But I turned on the drill press instead. Before I even knew what happened, it had spun up and smashed the back of my hand (which was still gripping the chuck key) into the chuck, giving my wrist a little tweak in the process. Luckily, the chuck key let go when it did or else I could have broken my wrist on the thing.

It's really sort of a bewildering feeling to be standing in the middle of your shop staring at a tool you've used about a thousand times before, knowing you almost hurt yourself doing something extremely careless. I'm fine now except for a couple small cuts on the back of my hand, but man that was messed up.

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That was a pretty good example of your last post. No matter how careful we are, we always take a big risk while working with powertools (normal tools also of course), and things can happen extremely fast. I don't doubt that you know how to use powertools properly, but it just takes that split-second to hit a powerswitch or something to get yourself really hurt. Fortunately you only seem to have a little damage. I heard of a guy once who worked in a woodshop. A friend of his had just used the jointer, but the blades were still spinning (power off). Then guy nr1 came and sat down on the jointer, because he thought that the machine wasn't spinning. Needless to say, he took a whole cheek off. I'm not really afraid of powertools, but I have a great respect for them, especially jointers, tablesaws, bandsaws, and routers.

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What a half-assed story !

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