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John Abbett

New Project - Style Of Gibson Byrdland

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Can you post a link to the jig you mentioned, Thanks, -Vinny

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I think the rubber may just be so that the rings don't marr the finish or dent the spruce (if its a spruce top).

Standard OP is to lay some sandpaper on the top of the guitar - face up - and sand the underside of the pickup rings to match the contour of the top. Do this before you finish to avoid scratching your buff job.

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I know that everyone will say that when it's done, people see the overall project.

But man, I see every little problem. Every little binding joint that didn't quite close up tight, or the angle is off or I sanded a flat here or there.

I'm not a perfectionist, just want to do the best I can, luckily by the time it's finished and no one really notices (or cares) about tiny little problems. I guess that is just part of it, you have to accept some things and move on otherwise you will never finish.

All that binding was a pain. Trying to get all those layers to sit on top of each other, get the glue in between them, and make sure that everything sits tight was a huge deal. The biggest problem was that I used pre-made strips for a lot of it, but there were two very thin .010 strips to add an extra set of lines at the sides. Those had to be bent the wrong way, across the flat with fibre strips. Turns out that is pretty much impossible. I couldn't glue it to the bigger strip and then bend it, because when I heated it up to bend, the glue came loose and it made a mess. I ended up breaking it into little chunks. And fitting the little chunks around the horn, making sure it was tight where it would be sanded flush. It was an incredible pain. It came out great, but I was cussing it.

I used the fat part of a soldering iron to bend them .. almost dry.

11 ply binding is a little over the top, next time not so much.

It takes something like that to make you realize that the plastic binding is cake in comparison.

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Everyone that cares enough to do the best he can knows where every little imperfection is. And they look huge to us: there isno way we can beleive nobody else can see them.

But nobody else can see them, or if they do, it's like pssshhh, that little thing?

It's the inability to do less than pay that kind of attention to detail that will mean all your projects will end up top shelf!

SR

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What's interesting is, I go back and look at projects I did a while ago, and say, man that looks great. I've forgotten where the little blemishes are.. It's kind of funny. I might not have been 100% happy with it when I finished it, but going back and looking at it from a high level again, you don't see the little things.

Anyway, one day I'll build one and there will be no mistakes..

(One time I put fingerboard side dots in, got going and forgot to put two at fret 12. I'm waiting for someone to ask about it.. I'm prepared to say, I planned it that way. =) No one has even noticed.

-John

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great old saying that I'm trying to piece together, heres the basic jist of it:

"The apprentice will make a mistake, not realizing what he did.

The Journeyman realizes his mistake.

The Master Craftsman makes a mistake, he hides it perfectly or it become part of the overall design."

-Vinny

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awfully slow John, Im pulling the garage apart now that the warm weather is here to better organize the work area. And re-sawing a bunch of lumber into usable sized pieces. I really got out of hand by accumulating too much stock. I have enough to build with for years to come. I calculated the ideal size for neck blanks, sides for bending, center blocks and tops and backs. Then marked up my rough boards for cutting. I should post a picture, its like that show here the States called "Hoarders" :D -Vinny

Your build is inspiring me to get back to my hollow body. I miss the feel of dried Titebond on my fingers, and the look of my kid's faces when I peel it off and watch their reactions, very funny.

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Looking great John! Very classy construction so far. What are your plans for the finish?

(One time I put fingerboard side dots in, got going and forgot to put two at fret 12. I'm waiting for someone to ask about it.. I'm prepared to say, I planned it that way. =) No one has even noticed.

Hehehe - I did exactly the same thing once. My solution was to add another dot on either side, so #12 has 3 dots. Then of course I had to do the same on #24 - more crowded for sure.

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Always cracks me up when you get to around this point in a build. It looks like such a simple instrument, nothing too flash or extravagnt. You would have no idea looking at it of the amount of work or skill gone into getting this far :D

Realy cool guitar man. What kind of finish is it getting ?

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It's getting a tobacco burst. One layer of yellow/golden transtint dye, with a little black sanded back then yellow/golden. Then Shelac to seal it up. Then Nitro brown, Amber, then a few coats of Nitro.

It will be burst on the back, front, sides and back of the neck.

Just like the picture that started this thread.

Neat trick. I messed up the front burst.. Heavy handed and got a run. I grabbed a rag and Lacquer thinner and took it right off becaue the lacquer thinner doesn't do anything to the shelac coat. I didn't have to sand back to wood, just took off the color and lightly sanded the blush off. It's a great do-over.

Plus, the shelac makes the curly maple really pop.

-John

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Looks great John, I cant wait to see this one finished. -Vinny

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Thanks. It was a challenge to make. Not perfect but not bad for a first try at something this complex.

I have some black walnut, 2 inch thick by 18 inch x 8 ft long. Thinking about making this guitar in black walnut.. Carved 1 board Face and Back, black walnut neck and ebony fretboard... Lots of dark woods.. I'm thinking it would look pretty cool.

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Thanks. It was a challenge to make. Not perfect but not bad for a first try at something this complex.

I have some black walnut, 2 inch thick by 18 inch x 8 ft long. Thinking about making this guitar in black walnut.. Carved 1 board Face and Back, black walnut neck and ebony fretboard... Lots of dark woods.. I'm thinking it would look pretty cool.

That is a serious plank of walnut. I agree it would look pretty cool. You could also make a one piece out of that...if you're looking for another challenge.

SR

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