Jump to content

Entry for December 2019's Guitar Of The Month is open - ENTER HERE!

guitar2005

Wilkinson Vs100 Trem & Body Thickness

Recommended Posts

When installing the wilkinson trem, it appears to me as though the body thickness must be at least 1-3/4" thick or you run the risk of not having enough room between the trem springs and the cavity plate. I have a body that is just under 1-3/4" thick, recessed trem route cover and with the trem against the body, the springs touch. I guess that with the neck installed and the action set, the trem would be higher but still very close.

Has anyone here built a Wilkinson VS100 equipped guitar with a body thickness of less than 1-3/4?

I'm thinking that maybe the block can be cut but that would be overkill, no? might as well just re-do the back of the guitar with a veneer/cap to bring it up to proper thickness.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd shorten the block.

Much easier/quicker with the same results.

How does one shorten the block?

I know that the Ibanez edge trem has two different blocks - short block for guitars where the trem is recessed and a regular block for non-recessed trems. Perhaps I can just buy a sort block?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd try a 20tpi hacksaw ( only because I have one ) If you're taking off just a tad, you can probably slice it off the bottom of the block, where the springs hook in ,with out much affect. It *will* change the angle of the spring pull slightly , but not enough for you to notice it.

Unless you really just want to dress up the back of the axe with a killer veneer or something........ :D

Edit: there are interchangeable blocks of different materials/heights , so you might want to look into buying a different one, but the home-based remedy I recommended will get you by.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd try a 20tpi hacksaw ( only because I have one ) If you're taking off just a tad, you can probably slice it off the bottom of the block, where the springs hook in ,with out much affect. It *will* change the angle of the spring pull slightly , but not enough for you to notice it.

Unless you really just want to dress up the back of the axe with a killer veneer or something........ :D

Nah, I don't want to dress up the back because its going to be solid anyways. I could just make the back plate non-recessed but I don't like that look.

If you cut the block by hand, would it not be uneven? I guess that the trem can have the block removed for easier modification? From your post, It sounds like you remove the block from the plate, cut on the plate side of the block and re-install but hopefully, the screws can still go in full depth.

I'd be taking off maybe 1/16", 3/32" at the most.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd second the proposal of shortening the block.

If you need to remove that little it's probably easier on the spring side of the block, and would probably be safer if you do it with a flat file.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd second the proposal of shortening the block.

If you need to remove that little it's probably easier on the spring side of the block, and would probably be safer if you do it with a flat file.

taking off 1/16" seems like a lot to me, especially with metal.

I just like the look of a recessed trem cover.

Has anyone here actually done this with good results?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i have done a few brass blocks. i normally remove from the plate end to keep everything looking neat when reassembled and have not had problems with the screw holes being too short - but measure the depth first to check

i normally put a piece of tape around the block to act as my guide - last time i am fairly sure i used an old shinto saw rasp to remove the bulk before tidying up with a file and sanding board

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i have done a few brass blocks. i normally remove from the plate end to keep everything looking neat when reassembled and have not had problems with the screw holes being too short - but measure the depth first to check

i normally put a piece of tape around the block to act as my guide - last time i am fairly sure i used an old shinto saw rasp to remove the bulk before tidying up with a file and sanding board

Shinto saw rasp. I'll have to look that up. I guess that a finishing file and belt sander could tidy it up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've used table saw with soft metal carbide blade and removed just a little at a time from the plate side. Worked fine, but sort of dangerous. I'm fortunate enough to have a friend with a fancy machine shop and he had one of his people mill another block for me too.

I'm like a bull in a china shop with a file so I'd ruled it out... LOL

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've used table saw with soft metal carbide blade and removed just a little at a time from the plate side. Worked fine, but sort of dangerous. I'm fortunate enough to have a friend with a fancy machine shop and he had one of his people mill another block for me too.

I'm like a bull in a china shop with a file so I'd ruled it out... LOL

At this point, I'm thinking belt sander.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Belt sander is good. Just use the right kind of belt and score a nice line with a scribe so you know where to stop.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I do stuff like that with the 4" disc part of my benchtop belt sander...that metal disc keeps things pretty flat and smooth.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...