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crow

Jackson Soloist Copy

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Sick!

About time you used your powers for good! \m/

Evil is more profitable and has a better dental plan. :D

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Are you using a Jackson neck or did you make the one shown? It's hard to tell from the light reflection, just curious.

Bill

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Are you using a Jackson neck or did you make the one shown? It's hard to tell from the light reflection, just curious.

Bill

The neck I put together, but parts of the customer bought

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Beautifully precise although it is a shame you put the wood back in for the third photo. I preferred the two humbucker idea. :D

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Beautifully precise although it is a shame you put the wood back in for the third photo

You just totally blew my mind before I realized you were being facetious

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That is a HUGE neck joint... But doesnt look quite right for a set neck. Can you elaborate what you're doing here, or why you went with a large neck joint as you did? Maybe its the camera angles, I dunno.

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I would presume that the "meat" is left there to make the larger shaping work easier rather than working in carves on fragile unsupported areas of wood. Those pieces can easily be pared away during shaping of the heel if it is a set neck.

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I would presume that the "meat" is left there to make the larger shaping work easier rather than working in carves on fragile unsupported areas of wood. Those pieces can easily be pared away during shaping of the heel if it is a set neck.

+1. I don't carve the heel until the neck has been set and glued.

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I would presume that the "meat" is left there to make the larger shaping work easier rather than working in carves on fragile unsupported areas of wood. Those pieces can easily be pared away during shaping of the heel if it is a set neck.

Good point! I still have a lot to learn! :D

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Everybody has a lot to learn....I can't think of anybody who in all seriousness could profess to the contrary! Certainly, when things go wrong wood teaches you what to do next time. :D

Just looked at the carve again and it re-affirms to me how difficult it is to judge a carve well so the sharp areas keep their form and blend into the softer areas appropriately without becoming either too angular or too formless.

Wicked. I don't use that word either. :D

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The carving is a heavy thing always. Important, that let him be good for the eye and let there not be lack. I want to prepare a uptake then from the carving his front his end. And everybody may learn a lot from this according to me

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p.s. I've been carving a body lately, and I tried your "chisel" technique. I gave up very quickly as I was pretty much just taking monstrous gouges out of the wood. Can you elaborate on your technique a little bit? Im impressed with how clean you were able to do it!

(I just said screw it, and used 40 grit sandpaper on a power rotary lol)

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I am:

*GASP*

As I feared, it merely requires a level of skill and technique I don't have haha.

Thanks for sharing. You make it look effortless, but its really not with any control like that.

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The first skill in carving is learning to sharpen properly otherwise you end up using excessive force which is a danger both to you and to the workpiece. The rest comes surprisingly quickly once you realise how easily a sharp tool cuts.

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The first skill in carving is learning to sharpen properly otherwise you end up using excessive force which is a danger both to you and to the workpiece. The rest comes surprisingly quickly once you realise how easily a sharp tool cuts.

Yeah thats probably my problem. Cant do anything for a while though, tore a muscle in my pectorals, and Im down for the count for a while :D I'll sharpen up my chisels when Im back in one peice and go from there.

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If you don't mind the dust, learn to love your angle grinder. Seriously, with a flap disk, I have insane amounts of control over shaping a carved top, and it's very, very fast. Light touch, let the speed do the work. I finish recarving and any fine detailed work with a hand plane (Ibex violin plane, big size) and french curve scraper.

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