Jump to content

Entry for November 2018's Guitar Of The Month is now open!
ENTER HERE!

Bmth Builder

Are Neck Angles Ergonomic?

Recommended Posts

Hi guys,

I thought I read somewhere that neck angles are ergonomically better,

Measuring 6 guitars without TOMs only half of them have neck angles, they are all fairly modern (presumably) CNC built guitars so the manufactures would have made a choice to have no neck angle.

I've drawn up a neck through guitar with ABM single string bridges and they do not need a neck angle (in fact the ABMs are so low that I would have to thin the fretboard just to add a neck angle).

So is there any ergonomic reason to add a neck angle or will it make the guitar play any better?

Cheers

Neil

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This seems an entirely a subjective question. Personally i prefer no or very little neck angle on guitars, to me it feels better but i couldn't provide any evidence that it does.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As a player I prefer neck angle. Seems to be more comfortable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A angle in the neck ,makes tuning less turns and seems to stiffen the neck a little. I have played both styles ,I like them both.As one being better ,that is up to the player.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

yeah, its mainly preference but still worth considering

a neck angle will bring the nut end closer to the body. for some this ends up feeling cramped, but for shorter players it can mean less of a stretch

i was once told by a guy that he preferred guitars with neck angles as it felt like the guitar was hugging him. think that was an exaggeration but the idea of a guitar fitting around you for ergonomic benefit way was taken a bit further with the vox virage

vox+virage+sc+side+view.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is ergonomically better for the arm/hand on the neck, since it is not only less of a stretch, but keeps that arm less angled away from your body. The strings have to stay in a straight line however, so your picking arm/hand has to compensate for that comfort. So really, it all comes down to what feels right for the individual player.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I really think it is subjective... some people play their guitar low, some high, some tilt the neck, some have it level with the ground. Some play it behind their head...

*shrug*

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

yeah, its mainly preference but still worth considering

a neck angle will bring the nut end closer to the body. for some this ends up feeling cramped, but for shorter players it can mean less of a stretch

i was once told by a guy that he preferred guitars with neck angles as it felt like the guitar was hugging him. think that was an exaggeration but the idea of a guitar fitting around you for ergonomic benefit way was taken a bit further with the vox virage

vox+virage+sc+side+view.jpg

I actually find this to be true for myself. I steeper angle like 3 or 4 degrees does see to "hug" the body a bit. Personally that is what I prefer, but its all subjective though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My take is that strings run flat between the nut and bridge. It's ergonomically on the same level as an angled or non angled headstock. Players will decide what the angle is to their body by either holding the neck further away or closer to their body by pivoting the guitar body. Bridge height is a big deal tho. I like mine as low profile as possible so I lean towards recessed bridges on a neck with no angle.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ergonomics are realative to each person what one person my like another may hate. so if you like angled necks go with it if you dont then dont. personaly either or.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree that they are very much relative to the player also. A player who hikes the guitar up to the chest region may have a different ergonomic equilibrium for an instrument to one who Hetfields it down to the thighs. How you hold your wrists, and personal technique, the balance of the instrument, height of the strings relative to the body....all other factors in that whole ergonomics debate....a Firebird with half a mile of real estate behind the bridge is a mile different to an Explorer or a Tele is different to a Flying V is different to a Steinberger.

I prefer my strings low and close to the body over TOMs so I get less neck angle on my preferred instruments as a direct consequence. Then again what would I know? I'm a bassist. <_<

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Then again what would I know? I'm a bassist. <_<

Me too. I figure as long as I can still count to four, everything else is gravy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×