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soggybag

Gf Parts Guitar Project

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I really want to build a guitar from scratch, so I thought I'd start by building one from scratch for practice and experimentation.

I'd like to get some advice on how to finish this. I'm unfamiliar with what types finishes are available and what the processes are. I'd like to use a wipe on type finish rather than a spray type. I'd like to keep the finish as simple as possible. What would you recommend?

I'm curious about sealer, should I use a sealer, or are there finishes that do not require sealer?

Tis body has been sanded down to bare wood on the top. The back looks like it has some sort of finish. Not sure if it's just a sealer or something more. The top looks like it has some water damage I'm guessing I can just sand this out.

This body is from Guitar Fetish, the neck I bought many years for a project that I never finished. Here's a few pictures.

image.jpgimage.jpgimage.jpgimage.jpgimage.jpg

Edited by soggybag

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body appears to be ash, so you definitely want some sealer on it.

I wouldn't use a wipe on finish, as it will look like crap due to the wood and glue and epoxy stains. IF you want to go cheap, by some epoxy spray paint from lowes. Nice solid finish and cheap.

blazers are great necks, treat it well :)

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Thanks for the replies. I think this may be alder also. It doesn't have much of grain and is fairly light weight.

Would you recommend a grain filler or sealer before doing a wipe on type finish? I'm not really concerned that the wood grain is not super great. I mostly want some practice and get some understanding before applying it to the real guitar project coming up. I had been thinking of trying a minwax stain. It's all new to me so I'm looking for ideas.

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the body is alder

same difference really. multi piece body especially, unless you want glue lines to show through paint :P

apart from the tonal difference (which is a debate for many other past threads) there is also the massive pores you get on ash which are non existent on alder - obviously this affects the finishing procedure quite a bit ;) luckily in this case it simplifies things. one of the reasons leo fender switched from ash to alder was apparently easier finishing

so no need for grainfiller but a sanding sealer is always a good idea, it depends on the finish you are using.

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the body is alder

same difference really. multi piece body especially, unless you want glue lines to show through paint :P

apart from the tonal difference (which is a debate for many other past threads) there is also the massive pores you get on ash which are non existent on alder - obviously this affects the finishing procedure quite a bit ;) luckily in this case it simplifies things. one of the reasons leo fender switched from ash to alder was apparently easier finishing

so no need for grainfiller but a sanding sealer is always a good idea, it depends on the finish you are using.

To my understanding, alder will eventually show grain as it absorbs paint over the years. This problem is why Ibanez uses basswood veneers on the Jem models before painting. Yo are correct alder is a close grain wood, and ash is open grain, but they both should be sealed. Besides, its cheap and easy to seal!

seal_1661793c.jpg

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Yo are correct alder is a close grain wood, and ash is open grain, but they both should be sealed.

I did say sealer was worth using, the point was whether they need grainfiller before the sanding sealer

- its quite a big difference between the two woods

JEM's are usually all basswood, IIRC they use a basswood veneer to disguise the joins which can appear as paint sinks in over time. basswood in another wood with another set of unique working properties. It drinks finish and can be a bit fuzzy when you put the first coats on. using a high build sealer coat on it reduces the amount of lacquer you need on subsequent coas

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if we are going to do trivia lets at least get it accurate ;) Of the 4 JEM style guitars currently made by Ibanez 3 are made with basswood bodies, 1 is made with and alder body. but i will admit the one using alder is probably the most JEMish

http://www.ibanez.co.jp/products/eg_series12.php?series_id=62&area_id=3&year=2012&cat_id=1

and stop repeating what i said! :P

I say:

they use a basswood veneer to disguise the joins which can appear as paint sinks in over time.

you come back with:

they use the basswood veneer to cover glue joints.

ah well, at least you agree :)

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This is what I used to finish this white limba body and mahogany neck.

Wiped on a light oak minwax stain and let it dry.

Wiped on several light coats of wipe-on-poly with paint sponge. Allowed 24 hours between coats. After about 5 to 10 (can't remember exactly) coats, I wet sanded and then buffed out with #0000 wool. Then I hand buffed with wax. This guitar is around 3 years old and is my primary player. Finish has held up great for me.

limba_03-1.jpg

I did the same thing for this flat sawn zebrawood guitar

Viper_11.JPG

and the same thing for this Padauk/ limba guitar

Misfit_update_08-1.jpg

Edited by zyonsdream
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I was thinking of getting a guitar fetish body but was unsure if the bodies were made for 22 or 24 fret necks.

Looks like one of the bodies I was going to pull the trigger on. What is the length from nut to bridge on that body?

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This is what I used to finish this white limba body and mahogany neck.

Wiped on a light oak minwax stain and let it dry.

Wiped on several light coats of wipe-on-poly with paint sponge. Allowed 24 hours between coats. After about 5 to 10 (can't remember exactly) coats, I wet sanded and then buffed out with #0000 wool. Then I hand buffed with wax. This guitar is around 3 years old and is my primary player. Finish has held up great for me.

limba_03-1.jpg

I did the same thing for this flat sawn zebrawood guitar

Viper_11.JPG

and the same thing for this Padauk/ limba guitar

Misfit_update_08-1.jpg

Great work, thanks for the insight into the finish.

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