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wafer guitars

Wafer Guitars Have A Unique Construction Method

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I've been building custom guitars by an unusual construction method. The body shape is produced in layers, to form a strong light hollow box. A Wafer electric guitar looks like a solid guitar, but is actually hollow, so is a much lighter weight. See the build method in the You Tube video

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Hello and welcome to the forum.

My first reaction to this post was that is is a bit SPAM-ish. The concent are a bit self-promoting and I was quite hesitant to go further to klick the link, especially that it was one of your first post. However the video was interesting and you have a distinct building method that I don't think I have seen before. Nice! A bit more about the production method and wether you run a custom/semi custom shop or a full production operation would have been more informative and have meade the post a bit less self-promotive.

We are a quite tight comunity and we are a bit protective regarding spam and selfpromoting as there are a few full time builders here, a couple of "semi pros" like myself and several (very competent) amateurs on this forum. Your competence will be apretiated if you are willing to share ideas, production methods and other things freely.

So once again: welcome!

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We are a quite tight comunity and we are a bit protective regarding spam and selfpromoting as there are a few full time builders here, a couple of "semi pros" like myself and several (very competent) amateurs on this forum. Your competence will be apretiated if you are willing to share ideas, production methods and other things freely.

If you ask me, anyone that posts their work on a public forum is doing some self promoting.

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IMO, there are much easier and efficient ways to produce a hollow/thin/light guitar. Just look at the Fender Thinline or any other semi-hollow solid body.

I like the concept though, but it seems like more work than needed.

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Unusual construction method indeed. Looks like he glued thinner sheets of plywood on top each other. I also note that bridge saddles are in odd positions on nearly every guitar. Interesting solution as well the use of tremolo bridge on red guitar without spring cavity on the back. hmmm....

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Why is nearly every bridge angled? Im just not sure why you would go to all this effort, yet use plywood?

Not only are the bridge angled, the white guitar has a trem bridge with no trem cavity, installed as a hardtail. Very odd.

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We are a quite tight comunity and we are a bit protective regarding spam and selfpromoting as there are a few full time builders here, a couple of "semi pros" like myself and several (very competent) amateurs on this forum. Your competence will be apretiated if you are willing to share ideas, production methods and other things freely.

If you ask me, anyone that posts their work on a public forum is doing some self promoting.

Shhhh! Don't expose me like that! :rolleyes:

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Why is nearly every bridge angled? Im just not sure why you would go to all this effort, yet use plywood?

Not only are the bridge angled, the white guitar has a trem bridge with no trem cavity, installed as a hardtail. Very odd.

If you look closely the strings are attached into holes which are for intonation adjustment screws. String tension is the only force keeping bridge saddles in place. It took awhile for me to notice.

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Another thing that comes to mind is how would the pickups be replaced or swapped out? There doesn't seem to be a way to remove them once installed.

The intonation must be dreadful and I just noticed the placement of the pickup selector switch and volume control. There's no way you can have the selector in the neck position and not hit it while playing.

The concept is interesting but it needs more work IMO.

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If there's enough room in the body, and the wiring harness is long enough, the pickups could be moved down, slid over, then tilted out. Not easy, but possibly do-able.

The strings through the intonation screw holes is completely unforgivable, as is the use of a trem bridge plate.

I do like the shape of the body though.

And to be fair, he did say he has a "unique" construction method :)

Edited by DC Ross

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Layering vs using a cnc to have a contoured chambered guitar. Whoopee! Nothing new here. As far as the bridge, use a hardtail if that is the final intent. Less expensive and would look much better than using a trem and locking it down. :peace

JMHO!!

MK

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Another thing that comes to mind is how would the pickups be replaced or swapped out? There doesn't seem to be a way to remove them once installed.

The intonation must be dreadful and I just noticed the placement of the pickup selector switch and volume control. There's no way you can have the selector in the neck position and not hit it while playing.

The concept is interesting but it needs more work IMO.

I saw the same thing, but the black one is intonated... Wonder how he did that? O.o

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