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The body shape is heavily influenced by the Ritter Raptor Bass.

Scale length 34"
Top Sycamore ? slightly rippled
Body Ash

I think the top is sycamore. It was bought nearly 3 years ago and I can't find any receipts for it.

Tbass04Topwithbody.jpg

I draw another outline about 4mm away from the body shape by using a nut or washer as a guide with the pencil inside. This will be the
line I cut to with the band saw.
Tbass03Template.jpg

Pilot holes were drilled then using a 16mm bit drilled 2mm or so into the back of the body so when the relief holes are drilled using an
11mm bit, there would be no tear out
Tbassholerelief.jpg

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that outline technique is an awesome idea.

Thanks, it's such a simple idea not sure where I remembered it from, and it beats freehand.

I want to contour the edges quite heavily, so much so that the upper horn will be oval shaped very much like the Ritter Bass', what options do I have other than router or a rasp?

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My router bit is 12.7mm, after reading one of GSP' post I bought a 20mm and 15mm bearing, so I could trim the body down in stages.

I used the shaped waste parts of the body and template to act as a support for the router, which is particularly useful when doing the horns. The mdf was stuck to the Ash with double sided tape, and after I had routed 3/4 of the sides I flipped everything over then used a bottom bearing guided bit to finish off.

DSCF3461routesupport.jpg

Some relief holes drilled out before hollowing out the 2 sections, and I have also drawn in and written on the body where to route for the pup wires, as I forgot to do this on my previous build and had to drill the holes through the pickup cavity using a 20" bit because of the angle.

DSCF3462hollowreliefholes.jpg

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Dang JAYCEE, it's been a minute or two since we heard from you. Hope you have been well.

The bass is looking very nice!

SR

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That's looking GREAT Jaycee :)    The number of times I've forgotten to pre-rout the control channels....:rolleyes:

I like the look of the top.  Figured sycamore can be very nice indeed...

Andy

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Welcome back, @jaycee! Hopefully you'd been on some goId adventures in the meantime. Quite a break you took...I remember this build though....

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Thanks for the wb guys. Must be eighteen months - two years since I worked on this bass, hopefully I will fret it in the next week.

Just glad to be back building, I have been up and down health wise and couldn't get my head around building.

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Hopefully nothing too bad. I'd be lost if I were unable to make, build and design. It's what keeps me happy when I'm down or ill.

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Fret slots are cut, slots received a slight bit of relief to facilitate better sitting and removal just in case. Also a few coats of Danish oil.

Danish%20oil.jpg

fret%20relief.jpg

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I have this finished, ......but there is a problem with the sound.  There is a slight hum and a ticking noise when any metal part is touched. It's not too obtrusive but nonetheless it is annoying.  I have changed the pots, de-soldered  the pups one at a time and re-soldered every joint several times. The only thing I haven't done is change the pickups as I have no replacements.  When I took it to my local music shop they tested everything and no fault could be found.   Ant ideas?

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a pic would help - what type of pickups-and if needed based on pickups an explanation of how its grounded. Without any other info I would take a stab in the dark and say you have an issue with a ground wire- but I don't know if you have say EMGs in there or not.

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I have a suggestion... I had a similar problem with one of my guitars, it was the cable. If they start to become damaged the ground can become a bit funny. If you have another cable I'd try that first. The only other thing I can think of that's easy to check is open up your control cover and (if you have one) alligator clip from your ground to your bridge or a string and see if that helps. Also, if your bridge is coated like your tuners are, check that you've scratched off the coating where your bridge ground wire goes.

Mike.

Edit: Also remember all grounds should be connected and make sure there are no ground loops.

Edited by Mike.Mara

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Thanks for the reply's guys. I have just de-soldered every thing and checked as I re-assembled  and it is still there. It is more noticeable when the volume pots are turned up full. 

 

It has a MM humbucker at the neck and a Jazz at the bridge, Two volume pots, one 3 way switch..

The only thing which was constant in the re assemble were the jack socket and lead, and I am 100% certain that it isn't the lead.

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Could you try (if you have enough) stripping a piece of wire, laying it across your strings so all are in contact with it and touching it to your ground somewhere? That should show you if it's a grounding issue which it sounds like you have since I doubt you could have missed a bad joint doing it as many times as you have. If the humming stops, it's your bridge ground... Either through a bad contact with your bridge ground wire or with the saddles being isolated from the main block. I can't imagine it's your pickups since a short there would either cancel the signal or severely reduce it. At least through my experiance.

Other than that I'm stumped unless you can post pics of your wiring with pickup brands and models. Glad it's not your cable... Those are expensive. Also could you check (easier if you have a multimeter with a continuity checker) that the metal casing on each component is connected to your ground. The more you eliminate the easier we can help.

Mike.

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You haven't mixed up the earth and hot wires on the jack have you? That's a common one, and super easy to miss "for anybody who hasn't done it yet".

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I too am a big fan of your washer trick... def going to use that and thanks for sharing.

Love the ritter basses... the most unique designs I've seen in the commercial market for a long time.  Looks like you are on par to do it justice.  Will be watching. 

afa the saddle grounds... had never thought about the fact that you probably need x ground wires... or some loop-to-loop tom foolery... good to know. 

Cheers

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1 hour ago, curtisa said:

Here's how I do it. Like all good methods demonstrated here, I stole the idea from someone else.

now that is clever sir.  love it.

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