Jump to content
Spykerwolf

Family classical guitar - Restoration/Fix up

Recommended Posts

Hey guys. I haven't done a build thread before, but decided to start one in any case. I've been working on the cheap family classical guitar that we brought from South Africa (nothing special). Unknown brand "Angelica". I haven't done any sanding/gluing or any other type of DIY work before really, hence why I decided to start on this. I'm still busy with it, but thought I'd share some photos of the transformation.

Before photos - lots of dings and scratches, headstock was cracked that I roughly fixed before:

kBGRSF1.jpg
0GuOOou.jpg

Will upload some more soon
 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Unfortunately I lost some photos during the transformation, but this is how it looked like when I removed the tuning pegs, nut and bridge.
It was a mission to remove the bridge - had to remove a hair dryer and a chisel ... or was it a spatula?
I also sanded the edge since it had this ugly black line everywhere - that was fading!

v47vBE3.jpg?1

Sanding the old fretboard
zN9qQsi.jpg?1

Headstock being sanded
ePvJueU.jpg?1
 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

After sanding it with 1200 grit sandpaper, I decided to stain it.
I used English Mahogany, and stained everything except the fretboard.
I kind of regret doing that now, since it looked so nice el natural :D

The top looks the worst by far
iUM2FxZ.jpg

03QYx6G.jpg

Ugly, ugly grain popping out D:
TpPt6NA.jpg

The neck looks nice in my opinion
gVMnPzR.jpg

FwyxpsH.jpg

FAIL
i1zBVdn.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

After about 2 coats of stain, I decided it was time to do the varnish.
I realized I didn't apply enough stains, because some of the paint started fading as I applied the varnish. In future I will also use lacquer instead of varnish, but I already bought varnish so had to use it.

Neck before varnishing it
WaxOh9S.jpg

YR9pUH2.jpg

MwBE036.jpg

GEjetm8.jpg

Sorry for the blur  :? 
MYZhFiQ.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's been a while since I've done anything to this guitar, kind of given up hope after some more mistakes.
I glued the bridge without sanding the surface, so as I tuned up the bridge slowly came apart. 
The top also has a little tear in it, and since it was winter then I stopped working on it completely.

However summer is approaching which means I've got some daytime left after work, so I'm determined to salvage something from this wreck.
I met a luthier close to home who can help me glue the bridge (and give some general guidance).
I tried to remove the excess varnish blobs with a razor blade, but because I didn't apply clear coat - the finish started to come off.
I decided I might as well remove the stained finish and go for the natural look + some oil (haven't decided on this one yet, any advice?).

This is how it looked when I removed the bridge:
2wz9kXR.jpg
9x55C7j.jpg
BZv3hND.jpg
GV6Np45.jpg
 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi and welcome :)

Its just coming up to bedtime here in the UK but tomorrow I'll post some more.  It's worth sticking with this.  You'll learn loads at the same time as ending up with something that looks great and plays just fine :)

oh - and I'm pretty sure I've come across Angelica classicals in the past.  They're OK.  Perfectly playable.  You can pretty much sand back down as often as you like until you're happy with the look - the stains don't actually go that deep....

 

With the bridge, you are right - it needs to be wood to wood....and you pretty much do need a proper bridge clamp.  They are not hugely expensive but one is pretty essential.

You will find this place full of friendly and helpful people - and any mistake you can possibly imagine making in your project, we will have already made and probably many times over ;) 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Andyjr1515 said:

Hi and welcome :)

Its just coming up to bedtime here in the UK but tomorrow I'll post some more.  It's worth sticking with this.  You'll learn loads at the same time as ending up with something that looks great and plays just fine :)

oh - and I'm pretty sure I've come across Angelica classicals in the past.  They're OK.  Perfectly playable.  You can pretty much sand back down as often as you like until you're happy with the look - the stains don't actually go that deep....

 

With the bridge, you are right - it needs to be wood to wood....and you pretty much do need a proper bridge clamp.  They are not hugely expensive but one is pretty essential.

You will find this place full of friendly and helpful people - and any mistake you can possibly imagine making in your project, we will have already made and probably many times over ;) 

Thanks for the kind words Andy, I'm actually looking forward to hear how it sounds :P This was the first guitar I ever played, and learned on ... so it's got some sentimental value to me. I'll be able to borrow a bridge clamp from a friendly luthier, so I should have the bridge actually connected this time! :P Just need to finish all the (hand) sanding first...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Welcome!

Andy gives good advice. Another option, if you are not happy with the way the wood looks, is to paint it. It's a common enough finish, and can end up looking quite nice. You can even paint the body and leave the neck natural if you so desire.

I'm looking forward to seeing how this goes for you.

SR

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...