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Prostheta    1,258

That's the one. Very cool stuff, and a new one to me since you started using it. Japanese Ash eh? Sweet.

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killemall8    392
12 hours ago, Prostheta said:

That's the one. Very cool stuff, and a new one to me since you started using it. Japanese Ash eh? Sweet.

Indeed! It always has some really cool figure along with the huge grain. Ibanez has used it on acoustics.

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StratsRdivine    102

Sweet work, and love your shape choice - I have always loved the aggressive look of V's and Explorer styles.  I used to be a UV chemist, formulating 100% solids sprayable coatings for industry, and still own one of the 20,000 watt iron-doped irradiators (ballast pulls 100 amps on ignition, and weighs over 600 lbs), so I was considering dusting it off and using it on guitars, so I was wondering why you don't use UV for all coats, not just sealer?  I recall formulating the clears, and they were difficult to buff out, until I started using Henkel aliphatic urethane oligomers (fancy word for same stuff in 2K urethane), and was able to cut and buff just like 2K automotive.  That was 17 years ago, so I imagine now there are UV cured topcoats that buff great.    Best part is sanding to powder 30 seconds after spraying.  

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killemall8    392

I tried using the top clear coat in the UV cure finish a few times. It was a huge pain to brush on and never leveled out enough to use well enough without a ton of heavy sanding. The brand im using says its possible to spray but its way too thick to spray out of a conventional gun.

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killemall8    392

Got the final clear on the dragonburst.
also here is a solid granadillo neck im working on. This stuff has a reflection just by planing. I cant wait to see what its like buffed and oiled.

 

DSCF1819.JPG

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killemall8    392
7 hours ago, Prostheta said:

Oil might well lower the apparent reflectivity. Looks spectacular though.

 

Yeah, i dont expect it to be quite the same with oil. Its just really cool to see how it has such a high reflective property. I imagine if it was burnished it would be like glass.

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killemall8    392

So I think im going to have to scratch the zebrawood SS carved top. It cracked in so many places that its just not going to work. Its too bad, for the price i paid for that 1 piece of zebra i could have gotten 3 mahogany bodies.

 

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ScottR    1,366

Wow, those are not going in the direction I expected. That almost looks like dry rot, are they punky at all?

SR

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killemall8    392
18 hours ago, ScottR said:

Wow, those are not going in the direction I expected. That almost looks like dry rot, are they punky at all?

SR

Punky?
It doesnt seem like dry rot to me. Ive had a lot of problems with the dark grain on zebrawood cracking like that. But never this much. What is punky?

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Mr Natural    240

punky means its soft or rotted- think of a cork in the middle of a piece of maple- if you felt along the maple- it would be hard- but when you pressed on that cork- it would be punky/soft. Extreme punky would be almost crumbly- like a branch that has been in the woods for years  that is soft/ rotted and crumbles apart.

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Mr Natural    240

I have never seen zebrawood crack like that- how dry is it where you live? Do you know the moisture content of that board by chance?

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ScottR    1,366

Luis, you have probably seen punky wood in spalted pieces. 

Scott, he lives in desert dry climate.

SR

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Prostheta    1,258

That is very unusual. If the surface was subjected to intense drying, sun or heat then I guess quick longitudinal shrinkage might do that? I would more suspect that there was something else at play. I've seen this in end grain from overly aggressive kiln drying ("honeycomb") but not in finished pieces. I wonder if the tree was felled and subjected to shock as it landed, or had grain compression from growing on a slope, etc? Very odd indeed.

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killemall8    392

Definitely not dry rot. The grain is hard and uniform. IVe had this problem a lot with zebrawood, which is why i chose to never buy it online again. But this time i got it from a local supplier. I dont know the moisture content, but they claim its always below 8% on the stuff they carry.
Really frustrating though.

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