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Norris

Build 2 - Dan's LP JR Double Cut

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2 hours ago, mistermikev said:

totally want to play musical saws with you guys! ūü§©

 

btw, norris... was that you in the video 'something' cheese band?  was watching the videos from your tele thread... some nice guitar playin' there.

I'm the bass player :D

Edit: and yes I've not made a bass yet. I'm honing my skills on lesser instruments ;)

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4 minutes ago, Norris said:

I'm the bass player :D

Edit: and yes I've not made a bass yet. I'm honing my skills on lesser instruments ;)

it's hard to recognize you without the overhead magnifyers (you should really consider adding those to your stage outfit)!  solid bass playing... wait did you just say guitars are <= bass? wth!  also why no bass solo?  guitarists get to have all the fun.

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12 hours ago, mistermikev said:

it's hard to recognize you without the overhead magnifyers (you should really consider adding those to your stage outfit)!  solid bass playing... wait did you just say guitars are <= bass? wth!  also why no bass solo?  guitarists get to have all the fun.

Thanks for the compliment 

Bass solo?! Wash your mouth out with soap! :D

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2 hours ago, Norris said:

Thanks for the compliment 

Bass solo?! Wash your mouth out with soap! :D

hehe, I know a naughty word!

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What a difference a sharp blade makes. I got the rest cut to depth last week using the saw that my instructor uses - an Irwin dovetail saw blade fitted into a gent saw handle for stability. The kerf is very slightly narrow for fretwire, but with a little filing with a triangular file they fit nicely so he says. The good bit is that they are much, much cheaper than most fret saws. I filed the slots afterwards.

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https://www.irwin.com/tools/handsaws/dovetaildetail-saw

Anyway on to this week. Hacking about with a blunt saw meant I'd managed to put a few scores in the board, so it needed tidying up again. I had to get at it with the 80 grit, so it was back out with the radius gauge and straight edge. This time I took along a laser pointer, which made checking for gaps much easier. Luckily it wasn't out by far

Once it was in shape using 80 grit, I then went through 120, 240 and 400 grit. That's about as far as I need to go 

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Next week we're onto drilling the holes for the tuners, then the headstock inlays 

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1 hour ago, ScottR said:

Yes, there has been an impressive display of meticulous attention to detail here for going on two years.

:)

SR

That's it - I've reacted twice today already and can't thank anyone or like anything any more :)

So, thanks. I do what I can in the time I have and like it done right 

1 hour ago, Prostheta said:

Wow, very very neat inlay work! Onwards and upwards.

The tricky one is coming next... :D

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44 minutes ago, Norris said:

So, thanks. I do what I can in the time I have and like it done right 

Bravo! Excellent plan and it's obvious you've followed it beautifully.

SR

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thanks for the tip on the irwin saw: they have them at lowes for $13 so... more than likely going to snag one.

that DW... looks like it was cut on cnc.  very nice.  what do you use to cut inlay?

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6 hours ago, mistermikev said:

thanks for the tip on the irwin saw: they have them at lowes for $13 so... more than likely going to snag one.

Don't miss @Norris 's advice of putting it onto a gent saw handle to hold it stiff and straight.  They are great blades - I've used them for years as general chop saws - but they are highly flexible and would be no good for fret slots with the standard supplied handle.  They need the rigid spine of such as a gent saw to keep them straight.

And actually, I've never thought of doing that.  Full marks @Norris :D. Another idea for me to steal.

By the way, the triangular needle file trick to take the sharp edges off the fretslots is an important one, whatever the width of the slot.  Just the lightest of strokes so that the slot itself isn't widened but the vulnerable edges are less likely to split or buckle in and jam the slot and prevent the fret fully seating.

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15 minutes ago, Andyjr1515 said:

Don't miss @Norris 's advice of putting it onto a gent saw handle to hold it stiff and straight.  They are great blades - I've used them for years as general chop saws - but they are highly flexible and would be no good for fret slots with the standard supplied handle.  They need the rigid spine of such as a gent saw to keep them straight.

And actually, I've never thought of doing that.  Full marks @Norris :D. Another idea for me to steal.

By the way, the triangular needle file trick to take the sharp edges off the fretslots is an important one, whatever the width of the slot.  Just the lightest of strokes so that the slot itself isn't widened but the vulnerable edges are less likely to split or buckle in and jam the slot and prevent the fret fully seating.

the blade on that looks a LOT like the dewalt saw I have.  It is really the best saw blade.  I've used it to cut slabs off for control cav.   it just cuts great... but I wanted a longer one and that looks like it.  I'll have to try building a handle for it.

the triangle file - yes, it may have been suggested before by either of you - on my delta cloud I did that and it made all the difference in the world.  thank you both!

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2 hours ago, Norris said:

A chap who is very good at cutting them by hand. :)

http://www.smallwonder-music.co.uk/shop/

that guy's inlay is "off the hook" - thanks for the link, but what I meant was - are you using hand tools or a router, or razor scribe - how did you cut it (that's really the magic there IMO.

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3 hours ago, Norris said:

A chap who is very good at cutting them by hand. :)

http://www.smallwonder-music.co.uk/shop/

I get my mop bits and pieces from them for the ziricote build, good stuff and not insanely priced like some luthier suppliers. I didn't know they did custom inlay cutting though. I've been thinking about getting a batch of my logo cut by someone so I might get in touch with them again, thanks :)

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2 hours ago, Andyjr1515 said:

And actually, I've never thought of doing that.  Full marks @Norris :D. Another idea for me to steal.

Thank our friend Colin Keefe :)

2 hours ago, Andyjr1515 said:

Don't miss @Norris 's advice of putting it onto a gent saw handle to hold it stiff and straight.

Colin fitted it into the handle of an old Hosco fret saw

2 hours ago, mistermikev said:

but what I meant was - are you using hand tools or a router, or razor scribe - how did you cut it (that's really the magic there IMO.

I stuck the inlays on with double-sided tape, scribed round with a scalpel (x-acto knife) and rubbed in some chalk to see what I was doing. Then I used my Dremel with Stewmac router base and the 1mm end mills I linked in your other thread. Finally they were glued in using epoxy mixed with ebony dust.

I'll do some more detailed photos when I do the headstock inlays shortly :)

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I didn't get around to posting earlier this week. Just started a new job, after 15 years at my old one, so catching up with the member builds has taken a bit of a back seat. 

Anyway, to aid with the inlay positioning I drilled the initial holes for the tuners. They are rather strange sizes, so will be hand reamed to final size later 

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The rest of the evening was spent positioning the inlay and doing the initial routing. I ran out of time to clean them up and glue in place, so that will be in the next update (photos on standby) :D

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looking good!  btw I bought one of those irwin saws... not sure if I'll use it for frets as I prefer to just buy that but I wanted something smilar to my dewalt for chopping off slabs for control covers... but longer.  nailed it!  thanks again for the heads  up.  Need to replace the heel... how did you get yours apart?  (was thinking a hammer might do it!)

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3 hours ago, mistermikev said:

looking good!  btw I bought one of those irwin saws... not sure if I'll use it for frets as I prefer to just buy that but I wanted something smilar to my dewalt for chopping off slabs for control covers... but longer.  nailed it!  thanks again for the heads  up.  Need to replace the heel... how did you get yours apart?  (was thinking a hammer might do it!)

I didn't dismantle it myself, but I think the handle is detachable 

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1 minute ago, Norris said:

I didn't dismantle it myself, but I think the handle is detachable 

so... hammer then... got it (hehe).

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I got the headstock inlays in last night. However this is only a mini update as I've yet to clean it up. Unfortunately I noticed this morning that in my enthusiastic cleaning up of the (wet) excess epoxy, I've managed to drag some of it out. So that means another fill after the initial scrape back.

Hopefully you'll get some photos in the next couple of days. I don't want to show the messy stage without a decent "reveal" at the end :D

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Actually it must have been my eyes playing tricks, so it's time for the mega photo update. So where were we?...

The fretboard inlay was a bit of a sod to scribe around. The headstock inlays were even more intricate, and being full thickness would have been nigh on impossible. So after a few test routes over the past few months I settled on printing an address label with the design on it to use as a guide. Early attempts made me realise that the inlays had been cut by hand, so the original artwork wasn't going to be much use.

I arranged the letters on top of a print of the artwork to get the alignment and spacing correct. Then a strip of masking tape to hold them together and onto the scanner to suck the actual inlay shapes back into the computer. A bit of techno wizardry later, including adding a thin border (the red bit), I had something I could print on a label to stick in place

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Taking the trusty Dremel with Stewmac router base and a nifty 1mm end mill bit, I set about it

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Plunge cuts were much easier to do than actual lateral routing, so a series of those followed by a few router passes got it somewhere close.

I then spent some time fettling each letter: test fitting, wobbling it about and nipping bits off by eye until it fitted snuggly 

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Eventually we were ready to glue, so I mixed up some epoxy and added ebony dust to make a paste. Old credit/gift cards are really useful. I trimmed a sliver down to a point so I could get glue in all the nooks and crannies, spread the glue and pressed in the inlays with another strip of plastic 

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Finally I scraped away the excess squeeze out 

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To sand it back I wrapped a strip of masking tape around one end of the sanding block 

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Then I could sand the inlays without taking too much off the headstock 

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...and now after sanding back...

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That last photo is extreme closeup. You can see the epoxy in places, but it's about 0.5mm wide. Fairly chuffed with that :D

Edit to say, that's down to about 240 grit. I've still got the tuner holes to ream out, so there will be a proper sanding session to come later 

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Who's this Horris character anyway? Sounds like a right old rogue.¬†ūüėÄ

Lovely stuff! Can't wait to see it sand through to higher grit. Those edges blend right in. 

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