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Norris

Build 2 - Dan's LP JR Double Cut

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When is a stray screw hole NOT a stray screw hole?

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When it's a "design feature"!

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Luckily it was on the centre line. That's about as much sanding as my dodgy shoulder can take this evening. Lots more to come though 

I also recessed the jack plate last night using the Dremel + router base + 2mm milling bit

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15 hours ago, mistermikev said:

that's a nice detail there on the jack.  cudos.

^ +1

It makes a big difference to the finished look.

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Earlier this week Dan came round for a "first fit". He's very happy with the neck - nice and chunky as he asked for. I asked if he wanted a subtle cut to improve access to the upper frets. He did. So I did.

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Slightly dodgy lighting, but it shows off the curve. You may have noticed I also pressed in the bridge anchors 

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... and the bridge fits.

Lastly for this update, I probably wouldn't have bothered to mention, but was so pleased with the result I thought I'd share a tip.

I bought some 2mm paua side dots, to act as a subtle marker as to which corner to push on the back cover to remove it. As I'd already finished the cover within a couple of grits I didn't fancy using a drill bit. Instead I mounted one of the 2mm end mills (that I used in my Dremel to route for the inlays, and have mentioned on other threads) in the pillar drill and used that. What a beautiful clean cut!

The photo isn't much to look at, but should achieve the effect I'm after

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(It looks like a rusty tack! :D )

Here are my test holes 

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So for super clean side dot holes use a down cutting end mill bit :)

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26 minutes ago, Norris said:

Last night I turned the guitar into a golf course by drilling 18 holes in it. Tuners, pickups and strap locks. Then sand, sand, sand. That's the last class for this year, so any more short term progress will involve cashing in a few brownie points with the missus.

So...

Tonight, after having been quite pinkish for many months...

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... it turned brown 

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First coat of Tru Oil still wet before buffing. It's got some lovely chatoyance as it catches the light. It should look lovely if I can get a gloss on it!

This first coat will probably be sanded off again as there are inevitably areas needing a little more detailing 

ow wow, that looks really nice with some color on it.  I esp like the little warble over there by the tone knob... I love little natural features like that.  I'm guessing this was filled with dark brown or black filler then clear? 

love the detail of the 3 pearl drops... but it keeps reminding me of a zz top song for some reason (hehe - I'm sorry, I'm very juvenile).

 

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45 minutes ago, mistermikev said:

I esp like the little warble over there by the tone knob... I love little natural features like that.  I'm guessing this was filled with dark brown or black filler then clear? 

No, it's completely natural and flat. Just a quirk of the wood :)

It is slightly knotty in nature. The oil didn't soak in as much there

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2 hours ago, Norris said:

No, it's completely natural and flat. Just a quirk of the wood :)

It is slightly knotty in nature. The oil didn't soak in as much there

it's a really nice finish. nice work.

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Oh, and if anyone is considering using Tru Oil, it's handy to know that it dissolves in common DIY store paint brush cleaner fluid. Next time I'll just brush the first coat on, as it's easier than wiping on with a cloth 

It's looking very flat, matt and brown this morning btw - very unimpressive :) Time  for some more sanding

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Lighter fluid, naphthalene. The main thing I've found about sanding is that you go dry if you want to maintain an open pore look and lubricated with Tru-Oil for closing them up. I prefer the latter, but occasionally I end up having to do a bit of steel wool and oil work when any slurry starts dragging and smearing. 

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1 hour ago, Prostheta said:

Lighter fluid, naphthalene. The main thing I've found about sanding is that you go dry if you want to maintain an open pore look and lubricated with Tru-Oil for closing them up. I prefer the latter, but occasionally I end up having to do a bit of steel wool and oil work when any slurry starts dragging and smearing. 

My tip was for cleaning brushes afterwards, not for thinning the oil. Handy to know though if I need to thin it down 

I've got more detail sanding to do before I consider closing up the pores. I'll be trying Andy's slurry & buff method eventually 

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Aha! That's useful to me also though as I've been using some terrible cleaner to wash Tru-Oil off my hands. Soap or dish detergent hardly touches it. 

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38 minutes ago, Prostheta said:

Aha! That's useful to me also though as I've been using some terrible cleaner to wash Tru-Oil off my hands. Soap or dish detergent hardly touches it. 

Wear gloves! :D

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That's true, however I've been doing a lot of very very large workpieces that demand a lot of detail work where fingers help. Gloves end up dripping and throwing oil around in my experience, whereas fingers push and roll excess nicely. It's whatever works based on the situation....in mine it involves sticky oily fingers. 😕

Black Walnut bed, all in Tru-Oil.

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48 minutes ago, Prostheta said:

That's true, however I've been doing a lot of very very large workpieces that demand a lot of detail work where fingers help. Gloves end up dripping and throwing oil around in my experience, whereas fingers push and roll excess nicely. It's whatever works based on the situation....in mine it involves sticky oily fingers. 😕

Black Walnut bed, all in Tru-Oil.

IMG-20191117-WA0000.jpg

Very nice!

SR

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On 12/4/2019 at 7:56 AM, Norris said:

Tonight, after having been quite pinkish for many months...

Yeah, I'm like that too. I never get a good suntan, I just burn... :rolleyes:

 

 

...Oh, you mean the guitar?

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4 hours (2x classes) to level and crown the frets. Nothing worth a photo. Frets are my absolute least favourite thing about building guitars 

That is all 

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1 hour ago, Norris said:

4 hours (2x classes) to level and crown the frets. Nothing worth a photo. Frets are my absolute least favourite thing about building guitars 

That is all 

Me too.  It's the fact that whatever it is, you have to do it 21 to 24 times!

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7 hours ago, Andyjr1515 said:

Me too.  It's the fact that whatever it is, you have to do it 21 to 24 times!

22 this time. What really gets me is that putting a few dents in the body while fretting is almost inevitable. It's steam time again!

3 hours ago, Mr Natural said:

sanding is mine ;)

Oh no, that's the best bit :D

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Yep fretting sucks. On the bass I'm working on, I had trouble getting the stainless steel fret ends to stay down, had super glue and press each fret end down for 2 mins... 2 mins times 48 fret ends :( 

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9 hours ago, Norris said:

22 this time. What really gets me is that putting a few dents in the body while fretting is almost inevitable. It's steam time again!

That's a good reason to fret before the neck join. Of course, if you are like me that only means the dents go into the fretboard instead of the body.

9 hours ago, Norris said:

Oh no, that's the best bit :D

For me too.

I think we are in the minority though.

SR

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