Jump to content

Entry for June 2018's Guitar Of The Month contest is open!
ENTER HERE!

Sign in to follow this  
verhoevenc

Shielding Paint on Nitro

Recommended Posts

Has anyone ever gotten some shielding paint on their nitro finish and not noticed until later when it was too dry to just wipe off? Even if you flake it off (comes off easily) the splash/drop will still leave a little shiny, silvery dot where it was.

Anyone know how deep these go into the finish? Suggested removal techniques? It'd be great not to have to sand/buff and risk going through any finish.

Chris

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

An y luck with this Chris?

I'd guess the silvery dot was a fine layer of carbon, but I have no idea of how deep it bites into the nitro.

SR

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was waiting on pipe cleaners to paint the cable channels I drilled between cavities. Once that's done and all the risk of more spots has abated I'll give the buff a try. I seem to remember a hand buff not being enough in the past, but maybe a true BUFFING compound dab will do more than the polishing compound I tried?

Chris

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, verhoevenc said:

I was waiting on pipe cleaners to paint the cable channels I drilled between cavities

Wow, that's dedication. Use shielded wire and save yourself the trouble.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I do use shielded wire, but that would assume the wire touches the pickup cavity wall before going to the control cavity. OR that the pickup in question has a shielded back (like the metal humbucker base). But let's say I have a jazzmaster pickup (even with a shielded cable)... it has no sheilded backing and therefore relies on the cavity's shielding. That shielding needs to be connected to ground too.

Chris

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Grounding the backing plate of a pickup if it has one won't offer that much additional protection against external noise. You'll get more noise rejection by using shielded wire as much as possible.

A jazzmaster pickup is fundamentally no different in construction to a standard single coil, and there are usually no special treatments applied to a Strat other than a bit of foil tape on the back of the pickguard and shielded wire on the pickup leads.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Correct. Sorry, I just used a JM pickup as an example, not as some archetype for this problem.

I get that a strat doesn't get much besides foil tape. Which is essentially the same things as the shielding paint. However, on a strat you can tape the cavities and pickguard and call it a day, cause when assembled, all of the foil pieces touch each other and create your full cage with path to ground. On a guitar without a pickguard you have one shielded cavity (pickup cavity) and another, totally disconnected, cavity that's shielded for the controls. Control one is easily connected to ground... however, the pickup cavity one is not. It's only path to ground is through a tiny holes where the pickup wire goes. Without somehow connecting the shielding paint of the pickup cavity to that of the control cavity, I might as well not have even painted the pickup cavity. Hence: running paint through that little hole too.

Note: another acceptable answer (which I've tried and liked less) would be to run a ground wire between these cavities and solder/screw-attach it to the shielding of your various cavities.

Chris

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Or ground your localised pickup cavity shielding to the shield of the pickup cable. But, yes that is more fiddly.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×