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FINEFUZZ    1

Hello, 

Here is an image of my guitar design I am preparing to build.  I am very excited to see this project start to take on its physical form.

Already, in reading though some of the builds on this forum, I have gleaned some very helpful insights.

 

Thanks,

Paul

w 2_edited.jpg

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FINEFUZZ    1

The top shell will be .125" cast bronze.

This part should weigh around 6.5 lbs.

 

The back will be ash and the neck will be maple.

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ScottR    1,366

It's going to end up Les Paulish in weight.

I'm looking forward to seeing this come together, should be fascinating.

SR

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Andyjr1515    537

That's quite a design :)

This will be a very interesting project to follow the progress.  Can't wait :)

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FINEFUZZ    1

Some time this last month, I gained access to a good 3d printer.  Prior to that, this wasn't a project I had planned on starting any time soon.  It still is a gamble, because I am asking the foundry to cast this part with a thinner wall thickness than ideal. 

So far,  my wood is selected for the back and the neck, and a black Schaller Signum bridge is on order.

Edited by FINEFUZZ
bad spelling

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FINEFUZZ    1

I am double checking all my math and now I am starting to scrutinize some of my decisions.

The dimension from my high E-string saddle and the bottom edge of my bridge pickup is .75 inches.

I based this off a hollow body les-paulish guitar's dimension I have.  It seems like that dimension may shorter than what I am seeing being done.  Does .75" inches seem reasonable, or would it be safer to bump it up to 1 inch territory?

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ScottR    1,366

You'll probably want to finalize that height by ear with the strings on and the guitar plugged in. My pole to string distance usually ends up closer to a half inch....or so it seems, I suppose I should check to verify that. In general the tops of the pickups fall somewhere between the bottom edge and top edge of the fretboard.

SR

Upon rereading your post I see you said the bottom edge of your pickup.:mellow: So yes, 1" will probably be a better place to start.

sr

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FINEFUZZ    1

Thanks, I will aim for one inch.  I have seen 2.5cm referenced for this dimension in other places which is basically 1 inch.

 

This is my first guitar build, and I am doing it a little backwards because I want to cast this crazy bronze piece before I build any other part.  It is easier to machine material away (if I needed to get the pickup closer to the bridge) than add material.

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ScottR    1,366

It just occurred to me that I may have misinterpreted that question. Were you referring to the location of the bridge pickup....how far away from the bridge to place it, or how high to set the pickup in relation to the strings?

SR

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ScottR    1,366

The sweet spot moves every time you fret a note. The closer the pickup is to the bridge, the more treble twang you get and the volume reduces a little as well. The further away from the bridge the warmer the sound is and it gets  a little louder as well. I have started moving my bridge pickups a little further away, as I like the warmer sound better. I can always pick closer to the bridge to increase the twang. I aim for something in the area of where the bass side of a tele or stat pickup lands.

Bottom line, if you like the cut through the mix sound of a bridge pickup best, move a little closer to the bridge. If you like it a little fuller and warmer move it a little further from the bridge.

SR

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