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Captainstrat

Tele-Pine-Partscaster project!

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9 minutes ago, Prostheta said:

Okay, I was wondering whether the nut might be causing issues in the first position. It would seem it's the frets then. Do you have a small straightedge or a fret rocker? I know they're functionally useless on a neck when it has a little necessary relief, however you might find something to explore further as a culprit. If you do find something, try and prove that is what the problem is using two investigative techniques....no point in chasing anything and everything as you can quickly compound issues than solve them.

Being a pre-made neck, I presume that the frets are seated well enough. I used tap them with my fret rocker (about all I use it for) to listen for poorly-seated frets. They sound different.

The buzz seems to have gone away, I just didn't realize I'd over tightened the truss rod - the fingerboard wasn't touching the slotted straight edge!  I loosened it up, the neck got straighter...looks like I'd created a back bow

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Well, this Telecaster project was a great learning experience.  I'm still patting myself on the back for not screwing up the neck heel, and the fret dress turned out okay!  I'm thinking that I could use my digital calipers to determine the first fret height (low E, High E and between the D & G strings) and use those measurements with feeler gauges to make sure the nut slots are cut deep enough that the action is comfortable but not so deep that I'm getting fret buzz...

And that's a skill I can carry over to my other guitars.  

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7 hours ago, Captainstrat said:

Well, this Telecaster project was a great learning experience.  I'm still patting myself on the back for not screwing up the neck heel, and the fret dress turned out okay!  I'm thinking that I could use my digital calipers to determine the first fret height (low E, High E and between the D & G strings) and use those measurements with feeler gauges to make sure the nut slots are cut deep enough that the action is comfortable but not so deep that I'm getting fret buzz...

And that's a skill I can carry over to my other guitars.  

The way my luthier guru told me was to sand a pencil in half, then slide it across the frets to mark the height on the nut as a guide. After that cut your slots a little short of that line for the initial setup, play the guitar for a bit, then fettle the slots deeper as required. You can always take more off, but it's more difficult to add it back on

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14 hours ago, Norris said:

The way my luthier guru told me was to sand a pencil in half, then slide it across the frets to mark the height on the nut as a guide. After that cut your slots a little short of that line for the initial setup, play the guitar for a bit, then fettle the slots deeper as required. You can always take more off, but it's more difficult to add it back on

+1.

I cant remember if I read that in Hyscocks book or not- but that is always the way I have done it- cannot go wrong. can also use that sanded pencil to "true trace" your fav guitar or neck and make paper plans to cut templates from (put a piece of tape over the exposed lead) 

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On 28/02/2018 at 9:02 AM, Norris said:

The way my luthier guru told me was to sand a pencil in half, then slide it across the frets to mark the height on the nut as a guide. After that cut your slots a little short of that line for the initial setup, play the guitar for a bit, then fettle the slots deeper as required. You can always take more off, but it's more difficult to add it back on

 

18 hours ago, Mr Natural said:

+1.

I cant remember if I read that in Hyscocks book or not- but that is always the way I have done it- cannot go wrong. can also use that sanded pencil to "true trace" your fav guitar or neck and make paper plans to cut templates from (put a piece of tape over the exposed lead) 

Excellent tips,  @Norris & @Mr Natural

I shall steal those shamelessly :)

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2 hours ago, Norris said:

 

In that case I'd better name-check my luthier who gave me the tip: Colin Keefe ... http://www.keefeguitars.co.uk/

:D

Do you know....I don't think I'd realised that your tuition was with Colin Keefe.  He's been on my 'a bit of a legend' list for years!

No wonder you thrashed me on the other month's GOTM! ;)

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29 minutes ago, Andyjr1515 said:

Do you know....I don't think I'd realised that your tuition was with Colin Keefe.  He's been on my 'a bit of a legend' list for years!

No wonder you thrashed me on the other month's GOTM! ;)

He is a bit tasty. I've seen some lovely instruments that he's produced. He used to work for Patrick Eggle before setting up on his own.

Anyway, enough derailing - apologies @Captainstrat

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Nice, the pine gives it a very ready to Rock n Roll look 😁 I believe the early Tele prototypes were pine weren’t they? 

Edited by ShatnersBassoon
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10 hours ago, ShatnersBassoon said:

Nice, the pine gives it a very ready to Rock n Roll look 😁 I believe the early Tele prototypes were pine weren’t they? 

Indeed they were, my partscaster is a cross between a Modern Player Telecaster (same neck and those also comes with a pine body)  and the 2017 Limited Edition American Professional Pine Telecaster

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