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westhemann

Misc Stuff about Life. Part XII

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Well, now that you asked... How much oil is needed for rubbing wood properly?

A friend wants to know...

 

Edited by Bizman62

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Alright, I guess I get it. All I want is to make it shiny for my own delight. If others get any joy of it, even better.

 

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4 hours ago, Bizman62 said:

I know this isn't meant to be a 100% family friendly forum, but I could have done without that piece of intimate information.

LMAO!!! :)

 

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16 hours ago, MiKro said:
16 hours ago, ScottR said:

Mike's days for a nice figure are long past.

SR

Just got me some wood though. :)

mk

I'd say you've got some nice figuration there and some serious wood.

Why is it that we live almost inside the woods yet you've got the most spectacular ones? I would trade all the trees I've felled to one single log of something like that!

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15 hours ago, MiKro said:

LMAO!!! :)

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Lovely pieces there, big enough to make some nice matching control covers, headstock veneers etc with too :) 

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Just now, westhemann said:

I'm gonna PUT OUT with my WOOD OUT.

 

ROTFLMFAO!!!!!! Go for it Wes. :)

MK

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9 hours ago, westhemann said:

I'm gonna PUT OUT with my WOOD OUT.

Be careful though. Wood exposed to rain or other forms of moisture can warp and swell and finally rot. Direct sunlight can make it crack and shrink especially on the side exposed. For both thorough oiling can help to fight the OUTside conditions.

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Anyone do the farmer thing? I want to start producing my own meat and vegetables. I'm thinking ducks, goats, a mini cow(milk)... I'm not a huge fan of chickens, but it might be stupid to exclude them considering how productive they are.

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You're thinking big there, no matter how "mini" your cow will be.

There's a couple of things you must consider with such a small farm and the first one is that you and/or your family will soon learn to know the animals and their personalities too well to be able to butcher them. And yes, even chicken have personalities! One workaround is to trade them with a neighbour who wants to get a bit younger animals. That's what we did with our summer chickens at our summer cottage. Mom had no issues cracking the necks of the old chicks at the neighbour's but having to do the same for the ones she knew by a characteristic name... You wouldn't kill your pet dog or cat for meat, a pet cow/goat/poultry won't make much difference.

Another thing is that with farm animals you won't be able to go on vacation unless you have someone to do the daily chores.

Vegetables aren't as problematic. You don't bond with them - and even if you do they don't stare accusingly at you at harvest time!

Our neighbour has some chicken in her back yard shed here in the suburbs. They don't need too much space to be happy. I'd start with them and vegetables and see how much more I could take care of. Oh, and possibly a pig or two to eat our potato peels and all the malformed vegetables we won't accept on our table.

 

Edited by Bizman62

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I know what you mean, but that's not really a problem for me. I was raised in a mini-farm situation and don't really get attached to livestock. 

What I never really paid attention to and have a hard time "googling" is kind of the "circle of life" aspect.

For example... goats eat weeds and scrub trees, of which I have plenty. Ducks eat bugs and stuff. Lots of them handy. Cow obviously grass.

 But it's probably necessary to create a symbiosis between the animals and plants, like the ducks help keep the garden debugged and the extra milk from the cow gets mixed into food for other animals like the protective dog or perhaps a pig or two.

 I am just looking for tips on defraying the cost of feeding the animals so that it's actually cost effective. 

I'm just not a fan of chickens either, so I'd rather replace them with ducks bdcause ducks are less invasive and much quieter. 

Researching it isn't very easy because most of what comes up only deals with shallow aspects like "duck eggs are larger and taste good", etc.

 

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How about guardian geese instead of dogs? Eggs, fertilizer and Thanksgiving "turkey" in one animal.

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Be interesting to know if ducks will produce eggs continually like chickens can.

A goose will make one hell of a watch dog.

Hogs are maybe the fastest growing of farm animals. If I remember my grandfather's words correctly they go from feeder pig (just weened) to market size in 6 months or less. that's a pretty good feed to meat ratio.

SR

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Ducks don't lay in the winter, according to what I read. That may or may not be true in Texas.

 The problem with hogs is they eat a lot of not grass. I'm thinking though that extra cow/ goat milk would decrease the money spent on pig feed quite a bit. Might make it feasible to have a breeding pair and butcher out the little ones. 

I really don't care for geese, but might consider it. Aggressive animals tend to get on my bad side and that shortens their life span pretty drastically. My experience with geese is they're assholes.

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I did some goose research and will definitely give them a try. It appears they are not usually aggressive towards the person who raises them, except for the occasional gander that will need to be culled. I've never eaten a goose, but apparently it's good.

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So my buddy had an interesting idea. Cricket farming as food for the ducks, etc. That would be pretty damn easy.

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6 hours ago, westhemann said:

Cricket farming --- would be pretty damn easy.

Famous last words... One main criteria in a cricket barn is a stable climate. Too cold, they don't grow. Too hot, they may grow faster but may die to stress, cannibalism etc. in masses up to 100%. Obviously in Texas you don't have to worry about frost, then again keeping the temperature below 30 C can be challenging unless you have an air conditioner - which in turns is far from ecological and will cost more than what you get from the crickets.

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Naw, that's the easiest part. Keeping a small area at 86 f isn't even a problem. We have lots of air conditioning options and 86f doesn't even take much energy to attain. Most of the "mini farmer" research mentions dedicating a closet to plastic bins. I actually have a walk in closet at one end of the house that I put on a separate temp control a few years back where I stored my guitars when I bought way too many for some reason.  Now it's unused.

 Heating in the winter is a different story...but that's just a few weeks a year here. 

 It's just enough for poultry supplements. It's not a commercial enterprise. 

 Of course, I may find it isn't worth doing...  I imagine in Finland it probably is really difficult to keep a space at that temp constantly,  but we have literal infestations every year where they invade gas stations chasing the lights and we have to walk on them to fill up our cars. They live most of the year down here just naturally. 

 Possibly you might mean a different type of cricket. Some parts of the world call grasshoppers crickets. Grasshoppers are difficult to maintain. 

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Hell, I might just get plenty of crickets, grasshoppers,  etc just by putting a light in front of the duck "house"

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26 minutes ago, westhemann said:

Hell, I might just get plenty of crickets, grasshoppers,  etc just by putting a light in front of the duck "house"

Now you're talking! A solar powered LED would be the optimal solution I guess.

34 minutes ago, westhemann said:

 Possibly you might mean a different type of cricket.

I looked for alimentary cricket farming so they most likely aren't grasshoppers, although our local university studies several species mostly from the fodder perspective. If they're for human nourishment you can't feed them just anything. In some article they talked about dry cat food as a good source for protein but buying protein to build protein sounds ineffective. The university people said that the mash from our local craft brewery is very good as it would otherwise be disposed of.

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