Jump to content

Entry for September 2018's Guitar Of The Month is open!
ENTER HERE!

Sign in to follow this  
mistermikev

calling it the "Delta Cloud' - my 2nd build...

Recommended Posts

so this is what I'm basically shooting for... I used pics of my actual top and my actual tailpiece here so...

TealEbony.thumb.jpg.b77125eb5a37a70fe6caf5e90d38d70a.jpg

going to be fairly hollow:DanoCavities.thumb.jpg.d3c18ff4d7e03b5176a3b95f0affa37f.jpg

got a few templates made so far...

IMG_0013.thumb.JPG.540af4b95d9d73fd5a2508cad2115bd0.JPG

 

challenges:

I'm a little unsure how my binding transition between neck and headstock should play out. 

ideas include

A. trying to put a slight angle on the headstock and keep the transistion straight(only have 7/8" material so... i don't know.  don't really want to glue in a scarf either so... maybe not.

B. just cut the headstock binding channel while the headstock is full thickness and simply stop the binding at a point close to the transistion. 

C. I'm doing a headstock overlay... could bind it prior to install or cut it short to make the binding channel (I believe this is what norris did?).

 

next step:

make the body route template.

 

 

 

... and templates galore:

IMG_0037.thumb.JPG.98299e4596a7e747ce3c2a88224317ae.JPG

 

some wood pile shots:

IMG_0015.JPG

 

UPDATE: *-==========08/09/18==========-*

so... I've broken ground.  starting off at 6lbs 7oz... that is fairly light for 2" frican mahog, yes?  all for now.

DSCN1456.thumb.JPG.d8e3e439ee88632e9efdef1f4a2b6f7d.JPG

 

UPDATE: *-==========08/12/18==========-*

made a little more progress this weekend...DSCN1457.thumb.JPG.d2f7ade71db825fd96e6660a919fb6ee.JPGDSCN1463.thumb.JPG.45f44a4de03a924e036cf60787bff7ba.JPG

1 outta 2 ain't bad: toggle cavity control plate worked swiimmingly - that dewalt saw is awesome... used a bigger saw for the other cavity but failed as the blade was too thick... so I'll have to pickup some 1/8" mahog for that.

DSCN1467.thumb.JPG.7259ff598efaa9a32130fcd71533f821.JPG

revealed some nice grain planing down my neck blank...

DSCN1473.thumb.JPG.b58240224259e81db6d4cb0a61959b5b.JPG

DSCN1471.thumb.JPG.2da4a49bfe5c5ffd0cda50375c9a94d3.JPG

 

 

 

DSCN1462.JPG

UPDATE: -==========08/20/18==========-

obligatory  forstner shot

DSCN1475.JPG

and after some work with the bowl bit...

DSCN1476.thumb.JPG.2c06cee988cf4b46550e5980fba02fda.JPG

 

down to 2lbs 9 ozDSCN1478.thumb.JPG.083ac05e568244c32c3506a180a3ba9a.JPG

started to work on joining the top...

DSCN1480.thumb.JPG.f0fe43c2115880ec44781fa8db545867.JPG

with the bit taking off 1/16" on either side...

DSCN1482.thumb.JPG.2da411c7be337dbb1ee875f80eac71ed.JPG

 

=====================update 08/21/18

mr natural: you da man.  used your trick for gluing up my super thin top.  worked like a charm!  Here's a shot of the top being held down by a bunch of slate tile.

DSCN1484.thumb.JPG.c2bc30423af558f59cf018121890092b.JPG

 

UPDATE: -==========08/26/18==========-

glued my top on...

DSCN1489.thumb.JPG.4b6b507f77c818fc97b1910a3f569cc7.JPG

 

used my dremel to cut the inlay channels in my fretboard...

DSCN1492.thumb.JPG.f1ac2c0f4eefdc58708fdb5815fc686f.JPG

final product...

DSCN1497.thumb.JPG.f2953b5d323baebd7ba4977db4c41f42.JPG

routered off the excess on my top...

DSCN1499.thumb.JPG.9a3cc86481003723c2cfc937a5064b60.JPG

sounds great when you finger drum on it!

DSCN1521.thumb.JPG.39f77b67e9de8a49f25541bc54318878.JPG

 

no puppy toys were harmed in the making of this photo...

DSCN1530.thumb.JPG.769869841999f6b85dac17d1802a8370.JPG

UPDATE: -==========09/03/18==========-

so did binding this weekend... went pretty good all things considered.  I taped/dry-fitted and bent the binding first... using a hair dryer (heat gun is just too much for binding I think).  Then I used ca glue to go around the body again and pry-apart/glue/re-tape.

DSCN1552.thumb.JPG.7399fe5aa5afcda0a86d730a2f0db32e.JPG

and a closeup...

DSCN1554.thumb.JPG.5564992b5890c2cd022ba19c02509f42.JPG

 

started carving down my neck too... I still haven't round a good bandsaw so I used a jig saw.  This meant a lot of excess to remove... so I just used a straight edge and multiple passes to prevent blowout.  DSCN1557.thumb.JPG.9f84b9590bd610a2cef3f7f095ed0318.JPG

one step closer!

 

DSCN1559.thumb.JPG.9c157be14f50c8af30fa1c72cb667abb.JPG

 

update 10/1/18

DSCN1741.thumb.JPG.7a19f9e7b91e1e2b084377ffffc62de9.JPGDSCN1739.thumb.JPG.45900e1a4c9a2ab8ae543347e98868b3.JPGDSCN1730.thumb.JPG.4a48453d5bf7958a1815dd69dda8280c.JPGDSCN1729.thumb.JPG.b132f94bcac0bf51680d07d4d3c6601f.JPGDSCN1728.thumb.JPG.0f9481ce27d217e669f5537f29c377db.JPGDSCN1743.thumb.JPG.502f676155410cacc2adb6278d899cff.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, mistermikev said:

cut it short to make the binding channel (I believe this is what norris did?).

Yes, that's what I did

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, ScottR said:

Love the planned colors.

SR

thank you sir... changed my mind on it a thousand times.  at one point was going to go with faux abalone binding and inlay but then thought "abalone clouds??!  that just isn't right" so switched to pearloid.  now if I can just get the actual to meet the theoretical!

 

on a side note, another challenge I'm realizing: the tip of the headstock.  I can't see inlay being one continuous piece there due to the strong angles on the 'cloud'.  If I cut it into small pieces I'm not sure I won't have issues with them sticking.  at this point am considering ending the binding and leaving the center 3 'humps' un bound but that feels like quitting before you start.  all advice on that point would be welcome.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

wow, some good info there. I was wondering how some got those razor sharp mitres.  was gonna use my chopsaw (jk).  note to self to build a drill press binding cutter.  excellent idea.

the mold - does offer a spark... perhaps I can create tiny little cloud pieces around a radius cut out of some sort.  or perhaps just use the actual and warm them up and press a mirrored piece on them and let them cool down.

"My mind is a raging torrent, flooded with rivulets of thought cascading into a waterfall of creative alternatives." - hedley lamarr

thank you!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, ScottR said:

I avoid binding like the plague....

SR

I avoid the plague, cause it leaves me in a bind.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

...carry on...

  • Like 1
  • Haha 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

well boys... I'm afraid nothing much too look at yet as I've been focused on my templates... just a few more moves to do there and I can start choppin' up mahog/flamed maple.

In the meantime, just thought I'd share a glamor shot of my templates:

IMG_0037.thumb.JPG.98299e4596a7e747ce3c2a88224317ae.JPG

have been working on perfecting the epoxy template method

for anyone who cares: the process is - 1)make my neck template (for instance) then 2) trace it onto something else and cut out about 1/16 around it.  3) put down wax paper, put two layers of masking tape around the neck-template edges, clamp everything in place flat, fill the gap between neck-template and neck-pocket-template with epoxy.  I guess the proof will be in the puddin'. 

thanks for looking!

 

next steps (this helps me keep on track):

transfer the neck-pocket template to the body-template.

transfer control-plate-pocket template to body-template

drill holes for control plate mount and knobs into control plate template.

Edited by mistermikev

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, mistermikev said:

 

have been working on perfecting the epoxy template method

for anyone who cares: the process is - 1)make my neck template (for instance) then 2) trace it onto something else and cut out about 1/16 around it.  3) put down wax paper, put two layers of masking tape around the neck-template edges, clamp everything in place flat, fill the gap between neck-template and neck-pocket-template with epoxy.  I guess the proof will be in the puddin'. 

thanks for looking!

 

next steps (this helps me keep on track):

transfer the neck-pocket template to the body-template.

transfer control-plate-pocket template to body-template

drill holes for control plate mount and knobs into control plate template.

Not at all sure I understand what it is you are planning here.  I shall wait in eager anticipation - I'm sure all will be revealed in due course :)

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Andyjr1515 said:

Not at all sure I understand what it is you are planning here.  I shall wait in eager anticipation - I'm sure all will be revealed in due course :)

nothing revolutionary - just describing how I made the templates for neck/neck-pocket and control cavity.  in the pics above you can see(leftmost) the 1/4 template for the neck and neck pocket... the grey line around the neck is epoxy.  those are two separate pieces that pull apart and the pocket template is a nice mirror of the neck template - no gaps.  that's all.

I know there are lots of ways to make a neck pocket that is a mirror of the neck... but this method doesn't require much skill and that's perfect for me! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

so... question: the top for this is 1/16-1/8 - probably closer to 3/64.  I know how to joint the two edges... but am not sure how I'm going to get good clamping pressure without tearing or buckling the top?  would love some advice.

my current plan would be to clamp one piece down to a 3/4 piece of mdf with a channel cut for the seam.  use 2x4 to keep it flat.  then place the other side and put bar clamps across... adding 2x4 to keep it flat.  the mdf with the seam would be a little short of the edges so the bar clamps can overhang. 

Edited by mistermikev

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, mistermikev said:

 but am not sure how I'm going to get good clamping pressure without tearing or buckling the top?  would love some advice.

i have always used the method of nailing along the outside edges of the bookmatch- nail along one side- then place a thin strip of wood underneath the joint so the bookmatch is slightly "roofed"  with the joint edges exposed open slightly-then nail the other side of the bookmatch making sure to keep the jointed edges somewhat tight. the idea here is you remove the thing strip that kept the jointed edge up off the flat surface,  glue the joint- then you have to press down on the bookmatch to get the center to press together- the nails on the outside give enough pressure to keep the joint tight- and a flat board plus weight on top keeps everything relatively flat and prevents the center from popping up from the pressure. Make sure to use wax paper over your glue line on both sides.  I would expect wood that thin will curl somewhat even after the glue dries. but you can flatten it out when you glue to the top of the guitar. 

here is a pic of what I am trying to explain- i used whatever I had laying around on top of the bookmatch- If I were you I would try to find a single piece of material to keep that flat. I have used this method as it is one of the easiest ways to deal with outside edges that are not squared. as you can see below- the bookmatch is wider at the bottom than at the top. the nails provide adequate pressure along the whole length. also notice the bottom corner is slightly curled up along the nails- that is about a 1/4 in thick top if I remember correctly- it happens- especially with figured woods. 

IMG_1162.thumb.JPG.4e68b1ca07929684ba5148a19b497c8e.JPG

 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

so... for lunch today I decided to check out a new lumber yard nearby... the guy at the desk told me they didn't have any figured woods.  I asked to take a walk about anyway.  low and behold... 8/4 rough flamed maple in the soft maple pile - 2 pieces 9ft long.  asked for a price: $4bf.  one piece is 5" and the other is 7.5".

I was all set to build the neck for this build out of some 4/4 flamed maple with no neck angle... because I still have not found a band saw that can tackle the 12/4 7" mahog I have...  not anymore! 

also - I fully recognize that I have a problem.  I have an unhealthy need to buy more wood than I can use.  I'm going to try to work on that.  also my wife may kill me as my wood pile is growing so if you don't hear from me - now you know why.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

so... I've broken ground.  starting off at 6lbs 7oz... that is fairly light for 2" frican mahog, yes?  all for now.

wait... I may have read that wrong (new scale) - that's 6lbs 0.7 oz. 

DSCN1456.thumb.JPG.d8e3e439ee88632e9efdef1f4a2b6f7d.JPG

Edited 1 minute ago by mistermikev

Edited by mistermikev

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My experience is that is fairly normal for African Mahogany. But you are going to hollow most of it out right? So all is good.

SR

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, ScottR said:

My experience is that is fairly normal for African Mahogany. But you are going to hollow most of it out right? So all is good.

SR

roger that... avg - good to know.  yes, going to hollow out this one... but have 11 feet total of this mahog so... trying to get an idea how heavy an eventual les paul might be! thanks for the response

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

UPDATE: *-==========08/12/18==========-*

made a little more progress this weekend...DSCN1457.thumb.JPG.d2f7ade71db825fd96e6660a919fb6ee.JPGDSCN1463.thumb.JPG.45f44a4de03a924e036cf60787bff7ba.JPG

1 outta 2 ain't bad: toggle cavity control plate worked swiimmingly - that dewalt saw is awesome... used a bigger saw for the other cavity but failed as the blade was too thick... so I'll have to pickup some 1/8" mahog for that.

DSCN1467.thumb.JPG.7259ff598efaa9a32130fcd71533f821.JPG

revealed some nice grain planing down my neck blank...

DSCN1473.thumb.JPG.b58240224259e81db6d4cb0a61959b5b.JPG

DSCN1471.thumb.JPG.2da4a49bfe5c5ffd0cda50375c9a94d3.JPG

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 8/3/2018 at 7:56 AM, Mr Natural said:

i have always used the method of nailing along the outside edges of the bookmatch- nail along one side- then place a thin strip of wood underneath the joint so the bookmatch is slightly "roofed"  with the joint edges exposed open slightly-then nail the other side of the bookmatch making sure to keep the jointed edges somewhat tight. the idea here is you remove the thing strip that kept the jointed edge up off the flat surface,  glue the joint- then you have to press down on the bookmatch to get the center to press together- the nails on the outside give enough pressure to keep the joint tight- and a flat board plus weight on top keeps everything relatively flat and prevents the center from popping up from the pressure. Make sure to use wax paper over your glue line on both sides.  I would expect wood that thin will curl somewhat even after the glue dries. but you can flatten it out when you glue to the top of the guitar. 

here is a pic of what I am trying to explain- i used whatever I had laying around on top of the bookmatch- If I were you I would try to find a single piece of material to keep that flat. I have used this method as it is one of the easiest ways to deal with outside edges that are not squared. as you can see below- the bookmatch is wider at the bottom than at the top. the nails provide adequate pressure along the whole length. also notice the bottom corner is slightly curled up along the nails- that is about a 1/4 in thick top if I remember correctly- it happens- especially with figured woods. 

IMG_1162.thumb.JPG.4e68b1ca07929684ba5148a19b497c8e.JPG

 

thank you again for this excellent advice.  I used some straight boards and clamps as my 'nails' and used a 3/32 thick ruler to prop up the top in the middle.  Removed the ruler and just enough pressure that the top wanted to spring up if left without any down pressure.  Held it down with some slate tile.

image.png.ef5d1f87af724cba8113a49334a45daf.png

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 8/12/2018 at 8:39 PM, mistermikev said:

UPDATE: *-==========08/12/18==========-*

made a little more progress this weekend...DSCN1457.thumb.JPG.d2f7ade71db825fd96e6660a919fb6ee.JPGDSCN1463.thumb.JPG.45f44a4de03a924e036cf60787bff7ba.JPG

1 outta 2 ain't bad: toggle cavity control plate worked swiimmingly - that dewalt saw is awesome... used a bigger saw for the other cavity but failed as the blade was too thick... so I'll have to pickup some 1/8" mahog for that.

DSCN1467.thumb.JPG.7259ff598efaa9a32130fcd71533f821.JPG

 

 

 

 

Very cool idea! I was planing on using a rip saw to cut 1/4 inch off of the guitar entire body of the and cut the control plate out of that but this looks like it could work better. Turns a lot of nice wood into chips but could be a lot better option than trying to get a straight cut through a 14" board.

Edited by Lwguitar
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×