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HSlash

Many Qs: Neck angle, PU cavities & neck pocket

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It's pretty common practice to squeeze a few dollops of silicon caulking in the channel and seat the rod side into that to eliminate rattles. Flat side against the fretboard.

SR

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Thanks everyone! I've dug a little deeper and seems like it shouldn't make any noticable difference. I'll sleep on it but for now, I am quite tempted to just leave it flat side down. I will also go out and grab some silicon tomorrow :)

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I've made some DIY wood filler with sawdust and wood glue, and it seems to get rid of the rattle when I put the flat side up... So maybe I'll use flat-up after all! 

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If you find a little bit of rattle later, don't sweat it. Adding a bit of tension to the rod will take care of it. Not so much to actually move the neck, but enough that it snugs itself against both the bottom of the channel and the fretboard will stop any rattle.

SR

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17 minutes ago, ScottR said:

If you find a little bit of rattle later, don't sweat it. Adding a bit of tension to the rod will take care of it. Not so much to actually move the neck, but enough that it snugs itself against both the bottom of the channel and the fretboard will stop any rattle.

SR

This 👆

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What would I do without you guys! Now thats sorted :)

Next, I was thinking about gluing the fretboard ontop of the neck blank, then shaping the neck and headstock. However as with all things guitar-related, I have seen mixed opinions about this. Others say finish (fret & inlay etc) the fretboard separately, then glue it on at the end. I can't see whether this would make any difference... Am I missing something?

Another thing people seem passionate about, is covering the truss rod cavity (e.g. with tape or a thin veneer etc). I don't intend on doing either haha

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I can’t speak of other methods, but my preferred method is to shape the neck with router and template, then glue on fretboard, then route the fretboard flush with the neck. I normally shape the headstock after, so I can test fit a nut to make sure it’s all good 

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....and I normally glue the fretboard onto the neck blank first and shape them together....

SR

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What about fretting the fretboard? Do people do that before gluing on or afterwards?

I'm going to do it after, though I see many do it before... Wonder why

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5 hours ago, HSlash said:

before

Easier to hammer in the frets while the flat back of the fretboard can rest against a solid, flat workbench. If you're making an acoustic instrument it also makes sense to fret first before attaching as it's near impossible to install frets into the fretboard in the area between the soundhole and the neck/body join without risking damage to the fragile soundboard. Can also be of practical use if you're doing a fretboard with binding

 

5 hours ago, HSlash said:

after

Easier to clamp the unfretted/unradiused fretboard to the neck while the glue sets up as there are no pesky frets and curved surfaces to deal with while clamping. Some people also choose to leave shaping the neck until after the frets are installed as it means that the back of the neck remains a flat slab for as long as possible to help with providing a stable surface to clamp and reference against during construction of the neck.

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Fretting after carving is only more awkward when you're hammering frets in, if you're using a fret press or a fret caul in a drill press, then it doesn't make much difference. But a round neck caul makes life easier to hold it steady if you carved prior to fretting. One argument for carving first - if there is any movement in the neck after carving, you have the option to correct it on the fret board before hammering frets in, but that will never be a problem if you're making a laminated neck.

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I'll be hammering the frets in 

Onto the next problem to think about - the tenon joint. I have attached an image of my current dimensions, would appreciate if anyone can just skim over it to see if they are sensible (I made them myself, no template). 

 

 

53766512_256604711912960_827605348574560256_n.jpg

53681361_348785525733516_2950335631168897024_n.jpg

Screenshot 2019-03-13 at 14.25.55.png

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Those dims are fine mate, that's very close to what I go for - generally I have a 47mm body. I start with an 18mm cap and 30mm body blank, cap ends up 17mm after carving. So where you have a 20mm rebate for your pickup, I have 22mm. 15mm un the pickup is plent, so is 10mm under the tenon 👍

I must say though, good work on planning, I stumbled across those dimensions in my builds by happy accident as I normally make build decisions once I've built them 🙈

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Thank you! Nice to know I'm getting the hang of it haha, I am very excited for build 2 where I can just go wild and not quadruple check each step.

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One thing I've noticed is that your tenon (after the fretboard) appears quite long. Are you planning to hide the tenon underneath the neck pickup? If so I suggest you offer up a pickup ring to see if it's going to overlap

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Yes I was planning to have the pickup sit on the tenon! What do you mean offer up? I was going to use a pickup ring on the final thing :)

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1 hour ago, HSlash said:

Yes I was planning to have the pickup sit on the tenon! What do you mean offer up? I was going to use a pickup ring on the final thing :)

just place a pickup ring on the tenon behind the fretboard and see if the end of the tenon sticks out behind the ring, if it does, it means your fretboard is too short. I had the exact same issue on my blue prs style build, I had to stick some "Extra binding" on the end of the fretboard to fill up 5mm of space

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