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this is what i made of it. thanks for the information guys. hope i didn't make a mistake here :D

tunomatic.jpg

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yay! i needed 'em!

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Does the distance from the bridge to the tailpiece really matter that much? I was planing on doing a tune-o-matic bridge with the strings going through the body after the bridge. Do I need to work out a certain distance?

Devon

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don't know if you need a certain distance.

I think best way is to make a drawing and pay attention that the strings just hit the saddle of the bridge and nothing else.

I'm making a body through with a tun-o-matic bridge.

I'm going to sink the bridge because i'm using no angle on my guitar neck.

I made the necessary calcultions, and i think it can be done.

Hope to post some pics soon. (already made my templates etc... starting the real work any day now) :D

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ok...hope this isn't considered hijacking, but I think it's relavent...kind of. Anyway, the neck angle consideration, how exactly do you go about recessing the bridge so that you don't need neck angle. Is there a set distance that you need to take the bridge down for all tune-o-matics for this to work? Also, there are these ferrules at stewmac. I'm assuming these go in the back of the instrument. What do you use for the front? All of the string thru guitars I've seen have some kind of round thing on the front of the guitar.

Thanks,

Devon

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I've seen some guitars where they used ferrules in the back and in the front. Just to prevent to damage the wood.

I don't know if there is a standard distence to lower a tunomatic bridge.

I just bought one and took the dimensions of the bridge.

Check how high the bridge is. After that, compare this with the height of the nut. If you make a little drawing of this, you should be able to see the distance between the strings and the frets. Because you can adjust the height of the bridge, I lowered the bridge so the strings touched my last fret. This leaves me enough adjustment space to get the bridge on the exact height.

The tunomatic bridge has a fixed radius. So i'm thinking of using the same radius for my fingerboard ( a radius of 350 in my case, but I don't know if this is a standard).

Hope this helps a little bit.

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I've only made one neck so I'm not 100% sure, but I didn't find it very hard to put a neck angle on the neck. The neck part was made straight wrt the grain (just sanded the laminates flat). The only part that needs to be angled is the little bit that will sit in the neck pocket of the body. It's only a few degrees so I found it quite easy to do with just sandpaper.

My neck goes about 3/4 of the way through the body and is visable from both sides, (kinda like the illigitimate offspring of a set neck and a through neck) so I had to angle quite a bit of wood but I didn't find it too difficult.

I thought about making it a straight neck and recessing the bridge, but I decided to take the plunge and I'm glad I did :D

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Hey guys!

My neck radius is 9.5" (It's a neck from a Squire Affinity Strat). I want to put a tunomatic bridge on it and a Bigsby trem. All the TOM seem to have a 12" radius. How do I compensate without adjusting the neck angle? Or is it that difficult to angle it? I'm a novice - this is my first guitar project. Thanks for all your help!

George

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I am putting a TOM on my 10 inch radius. Cut your saddle string grooves to different depths to get the proper radius. On some TOM setups you can change the order of the saddles to make minor height adjustments.

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The radius is independent of the neck angle. The radius refers to the 'arc' of the bridge itself (and the arc of the fingerboard; the curve of the frets, that is, not the curve lengthwise of the neck), not the height of the bridge or angle of the neck.

You will have very spotty action using a 9.5" radius neck with a 12" radius TOM. The solution is to file the saddle slots for your E, A, B, and e strings (keep the D and the G where they are) lower, to match the radius of the fingerboard. To do this, you'll need a proper set of files, and possibly some extremely fine-gritted sandpaper so that your filing job doesn't leave any burrs that would cause strings to break at the saddle.

The neck angle corresponds to the actual HEIGHT of the TOM bridge. Since the strings on a TOM are lifted up higher off the top of the guitar, a neck angle is needed so that the strings go straight from the nut to the bridge. Without a neck angle, the strings will be WAY off the fingerboard, and the guitar won't be playable.

A solution would be to recess the TOM, but you need to think about 2 things-- 1) you'll be better off with a Gotoh-style TOM without thumbscrews for adjustment (they have a small slotted screw in the post instead); and 2) it's tough (ie. the odds of ruining your guitar and your router bit are stupendous) to cut a rout into a finished and lacquered guitar. I've never tried it, but for all I know it might be downright impossible. On the other hand, one of the 'pros' might tell me they do it all the time. <grin>

In my amateur opinion, you're better off using a hardtail strat-style bridge of some sort, instead of a TOM. There are plenty around.

Greg.

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Thanks for the info. I'm learning alot by using this forum. Actually, The guitar hasn't been finished yet, so the recessing of the bridge is an option. Of course, I'm not sure how far down to rout the recess. How would i measure this? As for the hard-tail style bridge option, the purpose of using this TOM is so I can mount a Bigsby on the guitar. Maybe there is a better bridge that is lower for this?

Thanks again for all your help, guys!

-George :D

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Duh. I'm a bit dumb for not reading carefully... those are all points that are in your post. :D

There are lots of discussions on neck angle, so if you click the 'search' button at the top of any forum page, then enter "neck angle" as your search criteria and change the date range to "any", you'll get 3 pages of hits.

Here's one I found that had a handy diagram and everything:

Neck Angle Discussion

Now, once you understand why a neck angle is necessary, it's also easy to understand why recessing can solve the 'problem' (it's not really a problem per se, and in many guitars a neck angle ADDS to the aesthetic, playability, and feel). If you sink the bridge into the guitar, the neck angle gets less and less, until there's no neck angle needed at all.

Strats and Teles use a very flat-to-the-body bridge, so no neck angle is necessary. Tune-o-Matics are tall, so unless you want the neck looking all weird sitting above the body, you need an angle, or you need to recess the bridge into the guitar so that it isn't so "tall".

Greg.

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Thanks again, Greg for all your help. I'm still researching bridges, since I fear making the angle all wrong if I try to angle the neck. I may have found a bridge that works, with a low profile. Well, that's what the salesman told me anyway... :D

Check it out and tell me what you think:

http://wdmusicproducts.com/Merchant2/merch...duct_Code=BJMS1

He says this bridge was made for Bigsbys on solid body flat top guitars.

George

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ok...hope this isn't considered hijacking, but I think it's relavent...kind of. Anyway, the neck angle consideration, how exactly do you go about recessing the bridge so that you don't need neck angle. Is there a set distance that you need to take the bridge down for all tune-o-matics for this to work? Also, there are these ferrules at stewmac. I'm assuming these go in the back of the instrument. What do you use for the front? All of the string thru guitars I've seen have some kind of round thing on the front of the guitar.

Thanks,

Devon

Hi,

I'm Daniel, and I'm a newb at building guitars, since i will will be building my first guitar soon. I would like to build a Les Paul. But i have many questions. I have checked many references like Jon Fisher, and the "luthier than thou" site, but they never speak about angleing the neck. If you do have to angle it, i dont understand how you calculate the angle...

Can you help me out?

-Thanx

Daniel

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If you are talking about the angle of the top Vs. the center line of the body, yes, it is very important. You could run into intonation problems if you don't use it.

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this is what i made of it. thanks for the information guys. hope i didn't make a mistake here  :D

tunomatic.jpg

This link appears to be broken. I can't see the image. Can someone re-post it? Thanks!

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im building a neck thru without a neck angle and im using a tom. my fretboard is about 1/16 inches up and i am recessing the tom 1/4". i hope that helps.

-RAF

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From everything I have read so far it seems the concensus is to set the high E to almost the full front position and measure the scale length from the fron of the nut to there. I went onto the Stewmac fret calculator and it also gives you the distance from the nut to the mounting screws on bridges. They say to place the high E side post 25.5625" from the nut. They also give the mounting locations for most other popular bridges.

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