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  1. Yesterday
  2. ADFinlayson

    Ovangkol LP rebuild

    Ha not if I keep sanding all the red off. its not perfect, but we are back on track
  3. komodo

    Ovangkol LP rebuild

    That thing looks incredible. It's like it's just waiting to get out and do some damage to something. Angry blood red LP will not fail!
  4. ADFinlayson

    Ovangkol LP rebuild

    Yeah if I apply another coat, it will disappear
  5. D_W

    school me about planers...

    Yes to all you've said, though I always cut and thickness fingerboards with hand tools. I have a newer version of the planer you have (when I say that, I mean portable, not a craftsman). They generally will snipe. The typical procedure is this: * if you know the planer is set well, run an inexpensive wide board through, ensure that it's cutting similar thickness both sides. and that it's generally working properly * if you're not in a hurry, don't race to take off huge amounts. a 16th is fine - the board is going to go through and you can just basically pick it out, reduce thickness, feed it through, over and over.. * you should run at least one test pass with thin removal to make sure that there won't be much tearout (there shouldn't be with ebony - it doesn't have a lot of directional conviction or beam strength in the fibers) * your last pass should be relatively little removal to clean things up and not create more problems (the heavier the cut, the heavier the tearout). You'll likely have two problems: 1) the board will have snipe on the ends. You can see how long it will and make sure the area between the snipe is long enough for a finished board, or you can run dummy stock through. If your planer has four posts, it may have a locking mechanism and reduce snipe. 2) the planer's minimum thickness may be more than what you're looking for. You can affix your board to something to make it functionally thicker as long as that something is uniform in thickness (decent plywood is probably fine - I've never done this as I always hand plane thin items). I don't have the typical tools that a luthier would have in 2000, I have a lot of what they'd have had in 1890, so I don't have things like drum sanders, etc, that most folks would use to thickness something thin like this. Before you are finished with what you're doing, I would get a good look at the fingerboard with some hope that it is close to flat before final thickness. While I like to work entirely by hand and have no bandsaw or any such things, when the mrs wants something done (like casework, etc), I find a thickness planer to be a godsend, though it cheats me out of part of the work that I really enjoy (dimensioning). It's worth getting used to using one. They're not that dangerous as long as you keep your hands out of them, but they will make a filthy mess without strong dust control. Shop vac on trash can with 4 inch line to the planer will catch most. Watch out for the dust control nazis when you start talking about dust control.
  6. Andyjr1515

    Ovangkol LP rebuild

    Does the milky stuff go away if you wipe it with poly?
  7. ADFinlayson

    Ovangkol LP rebuild

    So here is the problem area re-stained, it's not a million miles off I guess, we will see what it comes out like under finish. You can see there is another problem area between the pots which I've touched up the same. But can you see all this milky wierdness? What do I do about it?
  8. Is it just me, but I can't see any images, only code.
  9. Hallo! 1st post! Greetings to all fellow forum members! So... Seems I just added "character", "history" and "personality" to one of my guitars... BIG TIME! Schaller locks are to blame! Yeah, yeah, should have check the drill size first. Now I now... <blockquote class="imgur-embed-pub" lang="en" data-id="a/FyknaKA"><a href="//imgur.com/FyknaKA"></a></blockquote><script async src="//s.imgur.com/min/embed.js" charset="utf-8"></script> So.... I plan on "DIY repair" this! I've read about nail polish, super glue, epoxy, layering and lot's of other "techniques". Which one would you recommend? The one that gives best results "cosmetically". I've read about some "specialty luthier supplies" that are great for this job. Recommend any? Also any links or "how to" videos I should use as reference? Any and all ideas and advice are very much welcomed! Thanks in advance! Greetings,
  10. Andyjr1515

    Ash neck-throuhg superstrat

    I like the neck heel and cutaway carve very much.
  11. ScottR

    Ash neck-throuhg superstrat

    Ah, that's what threw me off. I was looking at the one you had on the neck, and on ly now noticed the ebony board off to the side. And I'll repeat it--this is a super clean build you have going here. SR
  12. kmensik

    Ash neck-throuhg superstrat

    Thank you for the replies. The fretboard is plain dark ebony from a luthiers eshop in Slovakia, http://shop.sollerguitars.com/product_info.php/cPath/319_412_381/products_id/148gitarove--drevo/hmatnikove-dosky/eben/language/en/gitarove--drevo/hmatnikove-dosky/eben/eg1.html A friend of mine made the fretboard on a CNC, we made a test piece of some light brown santos (or whatever species it is, it comes from a crate in which exotic hardwood or veneer is being shipped from overseas). The pickups will be Duncan JB Junior. I have 3 bridge pickups branded Framus, hopefully they will play nicely also in the neck and middle position. Yesterday we made first test with the client, strung up with one pickup. It plays awsome, as it always does when you plug it in for the first time. Neck profile confirmed, body awaiting more contouring and roundovers, then all the sanding and hardwachsöl finish. The crab sign on the back of the headstock was also done on CNC by a friend luthier Michnov Guitars. Look how we bolted it to the machine's baseplate by the headstock. Imagine the torque.
  13. Andyjr1515

    Ovangkol LP rebuild

    Well - it's been a lot of trial and error. That is, it's been a right old trial and there's been a huge amount of error along the way Sounds a good idea. I've patched some similar multi-stain areas in the past (in fact, very recently!) and as long as you are not afraid to get back down to proper bare, dye-sucking, wood in the affected area, it can usually be a fairly invisible fix. When you are matching up the colours and the look, always remember that the still-damp colour of the patch will be pretty close to its final varnished colour. Then to merge the edge of the patch, as @mistermikev says, tinting the finish a touch in that area can work quite well (although clearly you can only use the spirit stain for this purpose)
  14. ADFinlayson

    Ovangkol LP rebuild

    You're probably right re the spirit stain getting lifted off, but every time I've used any wipe on finish (oil or poly) over a stained top (be it spirit or water-based) I've noticed some lifting of stain, the bobbly type marks you referenced from the sealer did in fact disappear when the sealer had dried over night, I also went over the sealer with some 0000 and as you say, it was as smooth as a baby's butt. Looking back, I think my issue has been that I started with higher grit, sanded and sanded, still had high spots to moved to lower grits and ultimately just took too much off. The majority of the top looks fantastic so I don't think the method is the problem, I think it's just my shit execution of the method. I think I need to have one more go at spot staining the problem area, seal it again and try to make good of what is there before take it all off. Kudos to you lot that can pull these finishes off well, definitely that hardest part of the job!
  15. Andyjr1515

    Ovangkol LP rebuild

    I've used both of those in the past (before deciding that sanding sealer wasn't for me) and they are good products. I suspect, though, that the colour coming off when wiping is more from the spirit stain with the cellulose from the sealer softening it all up again and releasing the colour from the stain. So yes - mist spray would indeed be better if you are going to use it at all. But I'm a bit mystified by the bobbles. If I go back to your April 14 picture, before seal coat, it looks as smooth as the proverbial baby's. As soon as the sealer coat goes on there seem to be the bobbles - which presumably is either raised grain or spray spatter. However, if you are talking mist coats, then there actually shouldn't be any spray spatter, so maybe it's grain raise? When did you first notice the bobbles? It's worth considering not using sealer at all for your second time around. Instead, poly directly over the stained wood but let your first coat of poly fully dry (overnight) and then apply a second, also dried overnight before going onto the normal regime. It will probably take a few more coats to start building up a gloss, but it will get there. There is another way too for stained woods, of which I may be the only crazy in the world who uses it, but it works for me. I prepare the stained surface with tru-oil - using a variation of the slurry and buff approach - before then moving onto the poly. More than happy to describe it if you want me to but otherwise I won't distract you with it at this stage.
  16. ADFinlayson

    Ovangkol LP rebuild

    These are the sealers I've been using. They also do an acrylic sealer but I don't think is compatible with the wipe on poly I'm got
  17. ADFinlayson

    Ovangkol LP rebuild

    I have the same sealer in wipe on form and it does a good job of sealing but it lifts off some of the stain, not so bad if it's applied carefully with a brush but removes a lot of stain if it's wiped on with a cloth. Multiple mist coats with the spray can version seals the colour in without removing anything. Short answer, the wipe on sealer is perfect for a natural top but less good for a stained top. None of that matters though until I master the level sanding process.
  18. Andyjr1515

    Ovangkol LP rebuild

    Is it worth trying a wipe-on sealer? I confess, though, that I don't use sealer in any case...
  19. ADFinlayson

    Ovangkol LP rebuild

    You're right the end result probably will be better if I start again, although I'm not looking forward to sanding it back to bare wood to the point where it will consistently take stain again. I did try to fix the problem area by restaining, but I couldn't get it looking anything close to what was there, to get the colour current colour, I stained it black, sanded it back, stained crimson red then stained used as a spirit stain to do some highlights. I'm also out of sealer so I need to wait for another couple of cans to turn up before I can start the process again which is annoying but I think I'll use to the time to do some more research level sanding etc so I hopefully don't cock it up again.
  20. ADFinlayson

    Ovangkol LP rebuild

    This is pretty much what went on, I had the majority of the body looking great and just had this one little problem area, so I wet sanded it a bit more and bam, straight through.
  21. Bizman62

    Ovangkol LP rebuild

    For what I've learned the end result often is better after a total restart. You don't have to take worry about any weak spots created at an earlier stage so you'll be able to work faster and more accurately. Whichever way you choose the time consumed will remain the same. At this point the main thing to ask yourself is whether you'd like to master the finishing process from the start to the finish or learn a trick or two in fixing flaws. For a builder the former is an essential skill, for a repairman the latter can come in handy.
  22. Last week
  23. mistermikev

    Ovangkol LP rebuild

    if it makes you feel better... I'm going thru pretty much the sm thing myself. I have learned an interesting trick tho.. i didn't sand thru... just lightened up an area... so I added some dye to my tru oil... actually works very well, however at first it looked bad until I built up some clear on top of it again. might be true for you as well. if you dye it... then take the time to build the gloss again... it might look ok. or add dye to your gloss. every time I get to the finishing step: I realize this is the most difficult step and stresses me out terribly. I had my one body 98% perfect and was about to say "good enough" but I felt like that was giving up... sanded just a little bit more in problem area and blamo... felt like I screwed it all up. Keep swearing that next time I'll leave well enough alone (I won't). Anywho, my long way of saying "I feel your pain".
  24. ADFinlayson

    Ovangkol LP rebuild

    I was until catastrophe. Sanded through the sealer in a big way. Not really sure how as I was sanding a very bobbly area with 1200 that was clearly high, tried restraining but it looks terrible and it’s right close to the f hole so is glaringly obvious. Looks like my only choice is to get the orbital sander out and start again
  25. avengers63

    Bent side ES style

    I got the bridge recessed a few days ago. I did a VERY basic sanding on the body today. Now I get to assemble and try out the HVLP spray setup I bought a few weeks before I lost my job. I'm not doing anything but laying out a few coats of clear. No buffing or polishing on the R&D mule.
  26. mistermikev

    school me about planers...

    yeah, 13" wide spinning blade still scares me a bit! also... godawful noise from that thing. I've had mine for a bit now and haven't really fully utilized it but I will def do so on my next build. I think I'll still shy away from trying to plane down to 1/8" tho. From what I gather that is asking for troubles. seems there are never easy solutions!
  27. mistermikev

    Customizing/restoring a Squire P Bass

    if I'm honest it was sort of wishful thinking. I don't even know why... perhaps just the spirit of diy. Either way a nice clean job of laying out foil is a think of beauty. It's nice to see.
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