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  1. 4 points
    I cut out the maple headstock and marked out the tuner spacing. I selected a walnut veneer to laminate over the maple. I wetted down the veneer to easily follow the headstock carve. I then glued and clamped it. I trimmed off the excess. I fashioned a truss rod cover out of aluminum. I used a natural stain and clear lacquer on the walnut. . I used D'Addario 9-42 strings.
  2. 4 points
    I've been doing a bit of traveling lately, so only a minor amount of time was available to apply to the art of making sawdust. The neck got some more love and is fairly close to final size and shape. Then I had to fix it up a place to live. Consummated On top of traveling and being super busy at work these days...which has left me far behind in my thread reading, my home computer acts like it wants to die. Or at least hack up a hair ball. We'll see how far she'll go. SR
  3. 3 points
    So about 30 min into it I nicked myself and my 6 yr old son brought me a bandaid. Then he said I needed a cofee break and got me a cup. Then he said i should take a break and watch a show with him. Guess what it is. I'll be back in about an hour lol
  4. 3 points
    Cheers guys, plan is to have a natural oiled finish with either Danish oil somthing alike as I dont know if the resin would react to laquer or a flash coat. More progress today though. Neck cut to size and truss rod in. Fretboard cut and only broke 3 0.5 milling cutters so win win today. Also, the masking tape and super glue trick is a game changer for me. Unbelievable what you can achieve, 100x better than a vacuum bed.
  5. 3 points
    Last weekend saw me doing a bit of woodwork again! Tenon cut down, neck glued in (with a little maple veneer for cosmetics and to get the depth right). The pickup rings appear to be stabilising alright too: Untitled by S K, on Flickr Untitled by S K, on Flickr Untitled by S K, on Flickr Untitled by S K, on Flickr Untitled by S K, on Flickr Untitled by S K, on Flickr Untitled by S K, on Flickr
  6. 3 points
    Some pics with the coper Schaller bridge and nut locker: Scorpionscar
  7. 3 points
    Been trying to make something out of some scrap Agba (Nigerian Cedar) and plain Maple. It’s very freeing to just go at a piece of wood, with no real regard to consequences. I suspect it might end up as an electric mandolin...
  8. 3 points
    I'll kick off this month then. My 6th and favourite build to date. Spec Top wood: Carved Ziricote 18mm body: 1-piece black limba 29mm Control cover: black limba Neck: 1-piece blank limba, 20mm D from nut to 17th fret headstock: Ziricote with white mop inlay fretboard: Ziricote, MOP 2-headed snake thing inlay plus 2mm white mop dots and mop side dots and Ziricote binding scale: 25" Frets: 24 medium jumbo nickel silver Finish: - Body: natural satin poly clear coat - Neck: Danish oil Bridge: PRS adjustable stoptail Tuners: Sperzel trim lock 3x3 chrome/gold Nut: Graphtec, 43mm Pickups: PRS 57/08 neck, HFS bridge pickup selection: 3-way toggle + individual coil splits Controls: 1 vol w/treble bleed, 1 tone and switchcraft toggle, ebony lampshades, ivory style pickup rings and switch-tip Weight: 8 lb 4oz Build thread: http://www.projectguitar.com/forums/topic/49493-hi-starting-building-6/ Demo video Photos
  9. 3 points
    I've earned enough brownie points with the good Lady Norris recently to be allowed to make some sawdust, and lots of it. It was control cavity routing day First I transferred my templates to 18mm mdf. Then I drilled out and routed the main cavity Some minor "ledge dive" but otherwise reasonably neat. I did all the routing with my small Makita. I'll have to buy a stubby template bit to do the ledge rebate
  10. 3 points
    Well they finally got back to me once they found the test results. Funny, after we talked he agrees that I am on the right track with my problem. I don't have cancer or infection as best they can tell. Will meet with one more Doctor to do a few final tests to 100% rule those out and further define what is going on. LOL!!! Finally movement in the right direction. MK
  11. 3 points
    Man, you get the most killer drop tops.... SR
  12. 3 points
    ....approximately 3 inches past where mine stops...... I like the way my long tenon is completely encapsulated by the body woods. There is much more gluing surface than a neck through. It is the strongest connection I can imagine. Total voodoo, but it makes me happy. SR
  13. 3 points
    Thanks chaps, I’m got a voice recorder and lapel mic thanks to @Urumiko and used that audio over the footage. The recorder isn’t doing any auto levelling but it’s possible that the software is. Will examine further during the next lot of editing. Yes speaking slowly, probably due to 10 years of being a software engineer talking to people in marketing
  14. 3 points
    It is easy to see my inspiration is the Paul Bigsby guitars of the 1940's. His eclectic, hands-on and one-off approach was super cool. My background was opposite as a production kitchen cabinet maker. I basically established a formula and repeated it. This build, my first as a retired dude, was a chance to take some time, be creative and riff on what has inspired me. I'm an artist, amateur musician and guitar maker and do this for my own enjoyment in my garage/workshop. The guitar body is 1 1/2" poplar with 1/4" maple, oak and mahogany pieces laminated to the back. The neck is maple with a rosewood fingerboard and pearloid inlays. It is a 25 1/2" scale. I fashioned an aluminum neck plate. I applied a walnut veneer to the headstock and finished it off with a handmade aluminum truss rod cover. Sperzel style staggered tuners were used which I dulled down with steel wool to match a satin aluminum finish. I sprayed the front of the body with a custom lacquer mix of a midnight blue color and clear top coat. I made oval pickup rings from aluminum with walnut spacers. The other chrome hardware was fumed in a muratic acid bath to dull down the finish. I hand cut and applied aluminum pieces to the end of the guitar to mimic the effect of a crescent moon. My idea from the start was to have the guitar express the winter and summer seasons. That is why the guitar is dubbed the "Solstice" model. I misted on a light blue lacquer to the sides of the body to imitate approaching dawn. I routed out the back of the guitar and layed in different veneers of warm tones in a geometric mountain/forest motif. I finished off the back with a lacewood crescent at the end. I wanted the vibrant lacewood as a counterpoint to the aluminum crescent on the front. The back was finished in clear lacquer with a bit of amber added. I chose the Seymour Duncan P-rails pickups because of the tonal possibilities: P90, single coil and humbucker in 12 switching combinations. I can only handle basic wiring at best so I lucked out in finding a schematic for this complex wiring setup on the SD website. I used push-push pots and one selector switch to keep the front of the guitar uncluttered so the pickguard shape stands out. I posted two videos: The first shows the different P-rail switching options in neck-middle-bridge starting with HB parallel, HB series, single coil and P90. The second is a short video of me playing utilizing a looper.
  15. 2 points
    Behemoth? Magnum? Pretty damn big guitar? SR
  16. 2 points
    Been building a guitar for my nephew, he’s 10 so have been making it lightweight, that’s the aim anyway. I was tempted at first to make a 3/4 size guitar, however was having great difficulty finding templates etc. Besides, it’s more likely to last him in to adulthood! It’s also a lefty, almost made a few stupid mistakes when I have forgotten this . I got a lovely piece of Norway Maple (grown in London). It was 7.2 lbs after I cut out the basic shape, so I planed it down from 45 mm to 32 mm (no toggle switch on this build so should be ok with regards to depth). This brought the weight down to 5.2 lbs. cut out the control cavity on the back and this brought it down to 4.6 lbs. I’m going to be putting contours in this guitar, same type that you get on a Strat, shoulder and belly cut. This should take off another 1/2 lb, maybe more. Neck is flamed maple. I’ve put some Evo gold frets in. It’s going to be a single pickup (Hot Rails), so kind of like a modern take on the Esquire. Haven’t glued the neck in yet, the photo is just for show at the moment .
  17. 2 points
    The folks at my new church are needing me to fill in on bass before too long. This is all the excuse I need to finally make the Rickenbacker 4003 bass I've been wanting to do for several years, I've had nearly all the non-wood parts for prolly 6-8 years now, so the out of pocket on this one will be minimal. My plan for all this time is to make a set of twins: guitar & bass, identical construction, same body. Both white limba neck-through, walnut wings, birdseye maple veneer top, cream binding. I've had the limba blank set aside fro several years, as well as the walnut for the wings. In the first attempt a few weeks ago, the limba moved after I had the bass neck all set up and ready to route the truss rod. It developed a serious bow. I was pretty pissed. I decided that, as plans clearly changed on me, I might as well go with an all walnut bass. The guitar will be cherry with ash wings. So the rundown on the bass looks like this: 4-piece walnut neck-through, walnut wings, 34" scale jatoba fretboard, burdseye maple veneer top, cream binding, Rockfield bass humbuckers, Allparts (Gotoh?) Ric tailpiece, Allparts (gotoh?) "elephant ear" tuners, and I'll have to make the pickguard. We start with the appropriate image... ...which I blow up to life size. I use several pieces of paper to trace the body and headstock to make the template from. Is it exact? Obviously not. If it good enough for me? Yes. And that's all that matters. 5 minutes of research tells me that Ric makes it 1,25" thick, neck-through. I re-cut the lumber for the neck for proper grain orientation, glue it up, and plane all the pieces down to 1.25". I don't remember the name of the technique for building up the headstock thickness - not a scarf joint - but I went with this style so that I could route for the truss rod without waiting another day for the scarf to dry. The truss rod is a "wagon wheel " style. I've never done this style before, so the wheel spot is a little sloppy. Fortunately, most of it will be covered up with the end of the fretboard and the veneer. basic mockup using the template headstock template with tuners another body mockup This is the wiring harness that came with the pickups. I have no idea what it does anymore. I THINK it's a 3-band EQ and master volume with a blade switch. It might or might not be active. There's no battery plug attached, but for all I remember it was supposed to come with one but didn't. Many years ago, I got the wiring schematic from Rockfield. I have since lost the schematic, and Rockfield is out of business. Hamer used to use this setup some years ago, but they won't get back with me. Unless one of y'all can help me out with this, I'll end up having to take it to a killer place in St Louis (J Gravity Strings) and have them figure it out for me. These are most of the parts that came off the Ric 300-series guitar I made many years ago. This is what will be used on the 4000-series guitar, though I'll prolly get a hardtail tailpiece. Being a cheapskate, and not wanting to mess with making and routing the sharkfin inlays, I just make some huge maple dots. So again, if anyone has any input or information on the Rockfield wiring harness, I'd really appreciate it.
  18. 2 points
    Some decent progress this week after a couple of weeks away. Managed to get the back machined flat, cut out to final size, and all pockets milled to size. Planed the neck blanks down and found they have a light and dark side, almost like a watermark and I like it, should be a good looking neck. Also planned and glued the fretboard and have 0.5mm milling cutters ready for machining the slots.
  19. 2 points
    Excellent....those welcome words 'the carve begins'...
  20. 2 points
    EP 7, stuck on headstock veneers and routed trussrod access
  21. 2 points
  22. 2 points
    I got the control cavity and pickups routed out this morning. The c/c was was mostly freehand, but I have a template for the pups. That's all for outside today, but I brought everything inside to glue on the binding while watching TV.
  23. 2 points
    In all honesty, I do, or have done all the above. In the beginning the course grits are about shaping as much as smoothing. By the middle grits, 180, 220, I start watching the scratches. When it get up into the finer grits, micromesh 2400 to 3600, I start paying very close attention, and may back up if need be. When there is a question, I'll sand that grit in one direction, say vertical, and keep doing it until all the scratches go the same direction. Then I'll go it again going horizontal. When all the scratches are going that direction, I know I've sanded out all the previous grit's scratches and can move on to the next. Note that this mostly happens on the clear coat, but it works with wood as well SR
  24. 2 points
    After some hours sandind the bevels, the guitar looks like this: Scorpionscar
  25. 2 points
    I added a cover made from some rosewood neck off cuts. That should complement the neck nicely. I usually don't like to start carving till all my cavities are routed. I want the flat stable surfaces for holding templates and keeping the base sturdy whilst running the madly spinning router. My pickups are set to arrive Monday, or so the tracking site tells me. Even though I have templates, I don't like routing pickup cavities till I have the pickups in hand. So I started the neck join carve. Just roughed it in actually. I will finesse it once the back is carved to its final contours. Maybe just a little bit around the scroll... SR
  26. 2 points
    Here’s some ‘Norway maple’ that I bought recently. The contrasting colours are slightly reminiscent of black limba don’t you think?
  27. 2 points
    In fact, as I was leaving the garage after my last building session, I kicked the vice on my little bench with my little toe and split it open right at the tip. I might have cursed a little. I didn't say I was being smart, just comfortable. The sandals often give way to bare feet halfway through the day. SR
  28. 2 points
    And I wholeheartedly approve of derailing the thread into a conversation.
  29. 2 points
    This is hopefully going to be a tactile mellow sounding thing to pluck on the sofa. It’s an old piece of flamed mahogany which is going to be chopped up to make a book matched front, back and headstock piece. I’ve got a pillar drill, a router and a few basic hand tools and will be doing most of it on the kitchen table whilst the Mrs isn’t looking. Going to put my Bodging skills to the test and see if I can triumph over adversity and create something worth playing. I haven’t drawn anything up, I’m just going to see what the wood gives me!
  30. 2 points
    My bridge, pickup ring, knobs, trussrod cover and control cover all landed this afternoon in the form of a fabulously busty fairly old ebony lady that came via eBay. After looking at the price of ebony in timber form it struck me that this is the best way for me to buy. Well seasoned, cheap, kinder on the forest and there’s a good chance its sale benefited a local person at its point of origin instead of a cruel logging company......that’s what I’d like to think anyway! Either way it’s 4lbs of rock hard ebony so I’m happy.
  31. 2 points
    I’ve got one very pumped up shoulder and have passed about 3 pints of sweat. Need to sit down until October
  32. 2 points
    Here we go. Went black in the end and moved the position of the controls a little. Still needs some dots and a bit of finishing work on the frets. Fairly pleased how it turned out considering we don’t have an electric guitar in the house to use as reference!
  33. 2 points
    Don't get me wrong, all I've ever played out of is big tube amps and have also spent a lifetime trying to tame the firebreathers to be tolerable in a small space! Probably a good place to mention that watts and volume are not what most people think. 5 watts can rip your face off and blow the ceiling off. Even 1 watt will.
  34. 2 points
    This thing might end up looking like a guitar.... SR
  35. 2 points
    Cut the horizontal profile. The fretboard is going to sit in a slight cavity in the body. Most of the sides will be gone when the vertical profile is cut but right now they're acting as buffers in case something slips . Here's how it went down. Put the fretboard template where it will go, outlined and carved it out with a chisel, square ruler and a razor. Didn't have a scraper small enough so I actually used the ruler edge. I used the ruler to plunge into the carve to be my gauge for the depth and carved to that point to make sure i didn't go too far. When I got the right angle I just took my time to get the edges right for the fit and used the ruler edge to clean and level what was left.
  36. 2 points
    Today I've been filling the voids of the poplar burl with resin. Some pics: Scorpionscar
  37. 2 points
    Jeez Mike. You're right....it should never have gotten to this point. Early diagnosis is the only way that diseases can be managed, especially ones where there's a short window for effective treatment. I hope they get good options on the table this time around, because that the absolute LEAST they can do after years of fucking dancing around your state of health. I know that healthcare systems are pushed to their limits these days (business has absolutely no moral place in welfare and health) but somebody should have been up front and kept you facing in the right direction instead of pining you off every time. Fucking disgusting. I'm going to find a whisky and have a generous few fingers for you, old fart. I'm terrible at writing stuff like this, man. I just feel pissed at people I don't know right now. This is not the way things were meant to be.
  38. 2 points
    Okay, Swim league is FINALLY done! Daughter swam her heart out and did well this year. Maybe I can get more shop time, now. I drilled through the heel of the neck, then through the body. I tried to fond a carriage bolt thin enough and long enough, but could not, at least not around the area (especially with the limited time I've had). I did find a regular bolt to fit. This is the neck glued up and clamped. I will add the nuts to the bolt and tighten it to help secure it. Actually, I will need my daughter's assistance - my hand will not fit in the sound hole.
  39. 2 points
    Well, that sucks big fuzzy donkey balls.
  40. 2 points
    Speaking of derail... The word f-hole is somewhat disturbing since I've learned not to use the f-word in public. Maybe holes are more glorified here? Re butttone... Haven't electric guitarists used all sorts of devices and circuits to produce a buzz, fuzz, suzz or any other more or less distorted sound rather than a clean ringing tone?
  41. 2 points
    Mmmmm... Scotch! I can't remember having seen the same doctor twice since my childhood. But I have doctored myself with some good Scotch several times.
  42. 2 points
    I wanted to use some metal on the front of the guitar and happened to score a few aluminum panels at the recycle center of my local garbage transfer station. The metal was about 2 mil in thickness and cut easily on my bandsaw and scroll saw. I cut a pickguard out of the aluminum and mocked it up on the guitar. It was a little overpowering, just too much metal. I tried different colors of 3 ply plastic and decided the black looked just right. I dulled it down to match the aluminum finish. This guitar is entered in the July 2019 GOTM contest. A link is below. http://www.projectguitar.com/forums/topic/49819-guitar-of-the-month-july-2019/
  43. 2 points
    Did you have to sell a kidney to buy that?
  44. 2 points
    I've always wanted to build a RESO-ELECTRIC, and this is it. Pine body used neck off of a accoustic guitar I had laying around.y
  45. 2 points
  46. 2 points
    well... I HOPE I've covered the "what does it do" in my demo... but def some stuff to dig into there. I'll have to think on that some more... it would be pretty cool to see a time lapse of wiring start to finish. I guess the problem for me is my incredibly short attention span! I bore the hell out of me! sorry for the derail AD. Back to your awesomeness.
  47. 2 points
    Yepp, it'd be pretty much similar to the wiring diagram. However, there's quite a lot you could do to improve a simple drawing: tell about the components you're using, why you chose those instead of equivalents etc. tell what that very setup does tell what each wire going to each lug does for the setup, like "this comes from the bridge pup and goes to the pull/push pot for single mode, that's why I solder it to the center lug. The signal continues from the left lug to..." tell why you chose that very wiring you see what I mean Back to the original topic: That's exactly what's happening in Sir Ash's videos. Anyone can buy a template and route along it with a bearing cutter. Telling what, why, where, to whom is the story that captures, the tools and making are just decoration.
  48. 2 points
    I applied bondo and spot putty to the glue seams. I finished sanded, masked off the back and sprayed on a couple coats of black primer. I use and recommend Mohawk lacquers. I mixed up black and Sy Casual blue for the front. I applied several coats, varying the mixture till I was satisfied with my idea of a midnight blue. I used the purple Harbor Freight touch up cup gun to spray the lacquer. I was so happy with its performance. I clear coated the front and back and added a little amber to mellow the back.
  49. 2 points
    This is #3½ of my builds and thus the latest completed one. Let's call her OR-Git since most of the wood has come from the outlet of the OR parquet factory in Mikkeli, Finland. As said, the woods aren't actual guitar woods. The top is of nogal which is some sort of South American walnut. In one of the blanks the last half a meter had some figuration which I bookmatched. The body is of roasted Estonian alder, bought from the sauna building department at the local hardware store. The neck is the same nogal as the top, with a cherry-merbau-cherry stripe from OR, outlined with 0,55 mm flamed birch veneers sourced from another factory by a fellow builder. The fretboard is of merbau, again from OR. Acrylic dots. Black plastic side dots. The electrickery cover is also of merbau The hardware and pickups are from various Chinese sources Two P90's, notice the matte sanded covers Wraparound bridge which I changed to a smaller one during the build Closed tuners with somewhat matching knobs Dark brown translucent speed knobs with copper digits shining from the underside. Finished with OsmoColor 3001 "clear" oil wax and carnauba car wax paste. Weigh: 2.9 kg/6.4 lbs The top was radiused by drawing the radius free handed to the ends of the wing blanks and planed accordingly. The silhouette was drawn using a template for a LP Jr. double cut. The scale length is 24.75" and the fretboard has 24 frets just because. The last ones are of no use since my sausage fingers won't fit... Designing the headstock is always a PITA... Again, I used the PRS template I copied from a fellow builder and tried to shape the rest to something original. Well... After having roughly shaped it against the end roll of the giant belt sander, our Master told that it looks somewhat like a Taylor, only narrower at the end. Quite some time later I noticed that my acoustic Tenson has just the same shape. Well what do you know... As for my woodworking background... I've participated a Saturday course at the Community College for four years now. Other than that, I've chopped quite a lot of firewood during the last 25 years. The few years at school don't count, that was too long ago and the results looked just like you might imagine, fine sanded with a rasp and flooded in thick paint... I'd rather do things my way than just follow a template. Up: cutting the shape for the wings Below: There's masking tape to protect the join.
  50. 2 points
    Lizardburst spalted maple EXP!
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