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  1. Here's my polishing kit: micro mesh and an automotive buffer. SR
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  2. Hi again, I won't go into any major detail on this because I'm (slowly) drafting a 'Bedroom Builders - veneering without the tears' tutorial that is hugely overdue but will be finished soon-ish. I got approached recently by a member off the Basschat forum to see if I could make his entry-level Jazz bass lighter. I'll do this in photos up to present but happy to add more details if anyone wants them. It's a nice playing, nice looking £120 bass: ...but one that weighs heading towards 11lb It turns out to be solid Ash, despite it's price point. No point in messing about: It is always surprising how little weight is removed...but it all helps. This had got rid of 1lb 12oz once the thin basswood caps were on: Then out comes the iron...this is what the tutorial will be about: And on goes the red ink: And now you're up to date. Next will be the clear coats and veneering of the headstock
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  3. final update: it's in the GoTM contest for January!
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  4. So I carved the top to a cylidrical section. Radius is about the same as the scale length, 27". Readjusted the neck pocket depth and angle four times before satisfied. Now just to decide knob and jack placement. I like the volume knob right under the center of the bridge pickup, but for most people it stands in the way of strumming. On the last photo there is a pencil line of a planned back contour, but I guess it might be comfortable even without it.
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  6. I won't clog-up the board with a new thread to continue this build, and technically I haven't done anything new since that ^. This is a tiny project that I invested in recently: It basically came as a box of parts with barely any instructions, but it wasn't particularly difficult to build and set up. The machine runs off an Arduino UNO and CNC Shield, which already had Grbl loaded. I've used a combination of Inkscape and the Gcodetools extension to generate Gcode, and then sent them to the controller with bCNC. The working area is only 130x100x40mm, but that's enough for cutting inlay materials, truss rod covers, control cavity covers, drilling templates, some inlay pockets, and whatever else. It's definitely only a light, hobby machine though.
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  8. And on to high gloss polish. There will be no leaping off the bench this time. SR
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  9. As promised @Andyjr1515 and anyone else that's interested. I have completed the fretboard radiusing jig and am pleased with the results, I used an old fretboard I screwed up for testing. It's really pretty simple, a main base with a riser, a sliding piece with a radius 1" larger than what your trying to achieve that runs on the main base, a router base that has a 6" radius so only 4 corners touch the sliding piece. With making the radius so small on the router base I can make a new sliding piece for any radius I need from 7"+.
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  10. So after all that, I went to a local lumberyard and stumbled into some amazing sapele. I'm sure you can guess what happened next. Another Pioneer: And a Voyager 7: I've already got a solid rosewood neck for the 7, now I just need to make a matching sapele neck for the Pioneer. This pair has been my first set done at the same time with different designs, and it's gone well so far. Over just a couple hours, I took these from blanks to nearly complete bodies, which is easily my fastest time yet. I've worked a lot to establish a set of common measures and an SOP (my Army is showing, haha) for standard no-frills builds like these, and it feels great to have it work out. That's enough out of me for today, thanks for checking in!
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  11. Working on the headstock: Cutting the pickguard and control cavity cover: Output jack and strap locks: The cover ledge has some pretty tight radii, so I have to use this adorable little template bit: String-through and neck bolt holes: It's starting to look like a thing! And finally- give me a rasp and some wood, things are bound to happen:
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  12. Thank you! I try to keep a fairly comprehensive set of pics for each build, but sometimes I just get in the zone and forget! Voyager 7 neck has been unclamped. Everything looks good and solid, so on to sketching out the heel carve.
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  14. KM-II #2 complete. Full gallery shoot coming soon...
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  15. It's really very simple. First is spraying nitro. Then go to that trick I mentioned with the 400 grit. Next I go through the micromesh grits: 1500-12000. I typically use them dry so I can see what is happening, but sometimes will use wet with mineral spirits particularly in the courser grits. Then buff with that Meguiers ultra-cut buffing compound on an automotive buffer with a wool pad. That does a brilliant job of removing shallow scratches and swirl marks. SR
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  16. Tone tape! What a brilliant concept! It would probably look brilliant with a paisley fabric top too. SR
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  17. awesome work, nice pics of the routing process!
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  18. If it were any more shiny it'd be invisible. Even the light would slide off it.
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  19. [Shawn Of The Dead] You've got red on you... [/Shawn of The Dead] Looks pretty spectastical, Andy
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  20. My refound special weapon! Painters tape that actually does seal the edges and peels off cleanly. When 3M originally brought this out our local diy superstore sold it and it was unmistakable because it was blue and no other painters tape was. Then the name changed and also didn't have 3M printed on it, but it was still blue. But, and you can hardly believe it, it didn't work quite the same. And the thieving bastards honourable retail chain still sell the rubbish product. Then, in an old fashioned ironmongers, I found this reel. It's Scotch blue #2093EL and this is probably the last reel in the UK as we Brits clearly don't know quality from stupendously high margin crap crap. Not that any of this irritates me, you understand
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  21. Wow! That Zebrano has a sweet antiqued look to it. Very very nice. Good luck in GOTM also!
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  22. Yep it should be fine doing it that way with thick bodies, my bodies are usually around 1.25" thick (31-32mm) and it does get a bit complicated when you get that thin. The only way I could make this work was to either take the heel of the neck really thin in that area which I didn't want to do, so I ended up at 3/8" thick. Or the other option was to modify the pickup, so all the pickups I put in these models will get the base plate swapped out for a flat plate instead of the dog ear type. While it is all figured out now and I know what needs to be done on the next ones I do it was a real pain to figure it all out. And yeah they are called t-nuts.
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  23. First Build: the Swel ZebraCaster Just missed the December 2016 deadline because I had to get some good pictures taken by my wife,, but finally I am able to post here! I initially started with a refinish/customizing project, but ended up building a guitar from scratch with raw wood, which I didn't think was do-able for me yet, so I'm thrilled already to be able to post in this topic! Specs The guitar specs: Tele-style body of Mahogany with 6mm Zebrano top 25 1/2 "" scale 250mm neck radius with assymetric 'thick' D-profile Birdseye maple neck with rosewood fretboard and Swallow-bird inlays Jumbo 6100 frets Zebrano-headstock finish Ibanez Edge floating Trem with top-Lock Dimarzio Paf Joe and Paf-pro humbucking pickups 1 Volume (push pull) for high-pass filter and , 1 Tone (push pull) for single coil switching Gotoh tuners Tung - oil finish I designed/built this guitar for myself. Specs were based partly on my Peavey Wolfgang (neck) and on the specs of an Ibanez Satriani JS10th (electronics, radius). the looks were inspired by Searls' guitars. I used the JS10th specs as I once owned one and really liked the radius of the fretboard and the versatile pickups. The Edge trem I had available and I really love Floyd trems, so that was an easy pick. Finally the birdseye maple neck because I love my Peavey wolfgang neck and because I'm a sucker for birdseye maple, so it will probably end up in every guitar I'm going to build! I was able (fortunately) to use a friend's workshop to do bandsawing and some bandsanding. Most of the work was done in my garage and back-yard however. Tools Some tools I created to get this done: fret press fret-slot duplicating jig simple thickness routing jig templates for body, neck, pickup cavity routing and trem routing Background This guitar is special to me as it proves that with little professional tools but a lot of care and attention basically anybody can build a good guitar. I've had the idea of building a guitar for a long time, but just not felt comfortable doing it and stuck to customizing. In the end it's just a question of doing it! Special thanks to all you guys on ProjectGuitar providing tutorials, tips&tricks and advice. Without this I wouldn't have been able to get this result. I've learned tons of stuff for my next projects. Swel guitars Swel is frisian ( local language ) for Swallow and is the symbol of my town so I used it as a name for my guitar(s) and hence also the inlays. Thanks for reading! link to a short video with crappy guitar playing ;-) link to the build thread:
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  24. You're going to build another one? is what I hear in my garage. SR
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  25. Juggarnauts!!! Frets dressed/polished and pickups in (Bare Knuckle Pickups Juggarnaut set with Black Battleworn covers)... We should have this one finished tomorrow and photographed for the website gallery on Friday - I'll post some here too. I'm also waiting for the oil finish to dry overnight on the 7-string KM-II #2 build, so we should have both guitars complete before the weekend PS. Yes, the fleece blanket with lions all over it... If it's good enough for a baby's skin, it's good enough for protecting a brand new guitar finish!
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  28. That's a very nice way to talk about my gadget addiction Having a bunch of very specific tools drives my wife crazy ("you bought another router bit? I thought you already had one!"), but I enjoy it, so there. Back to the 7 string thing! Dot installation via eggbeater: Carving the neck. Unfortunately, while Yucatan rosewood is a true Dalbergia, it does not smell nice like its relatives. I'll be able to finish up the heel area after getting it glued into the body. Radius and fret installation: It's very nearly a guitar! I'm hoping to get the neck set in by Friday, so I can finish the carve over the weekend. Time to order more hardware, I suppose....
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  29. Ok I figured out how to post pics again. any way Monday morning I finally got my ar to the range, I know there are better groupings but Im happy considering I was behind the trigger and cheap ammo. btw that's 100yards something like 91ish meters. so that's right at 1.25moa
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  30. "Whoa, plastic forks! Me too! Not so good in a bar fight though"
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  31. More work on the sapele bros... Pioneer neck pocket: I scarfed this neck blank up yesterday, so there's a bit of a time warp here. This is a compound joint, as usual for my multiscales: Truss rod channel: Neck outline: Headstock and tuner holes: Lightly stressful wiring holes: Quick little belly carve: Mockup time! And the Voyager 7 gets its neck pocket:
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  32. I had chili for dinner. Wes that's the story of my life, I have never been good at just walking up and hitting on women
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  34. A couple of weeks ago I smoked up some pork shoulder for pulled pork. I also smoked up a nice pork loin after cutting off a couple of two inch thick chops. We've been eating a bunch of pulled pork, and not touching the loin. This weekend I cubed it up and we made chili out of it. Damn fine stuff, that. SR
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  35. I likes shiny stuff! Which is why I never get back to the matte finish look. It's damned hard to take a picture of though. SR
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  36. Derail away to your heart's content. This thread isn't quite long enough yet
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  37. I bought a fresh bottle of Jameson and am getting back to my hobby of altering my state of mind as much as possible.
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  38. Ok, here we go! Picking up where i left off from last years thread: The only thing i have to show for this year is this neck blank. Walnut, paduak and cocobolo. Im waiting for some maple veneer to come in, so it will give a crisper line between each of the woods.
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  39. There's a lot of love for your Explorers, Luis.
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  40. Last night, sat down after a hard week and shared a Dalwhinnie, a Corryvreckan and an Ardbeg 10 with Nina. Glorious.
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  41. New thread, link back to this one in the first post!
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  42. Not much. I don't jive with smugness or a false air of superiority. "Arrogant buffoon" seems to put it bluntly enough. Hey Shay, check this out: Carl is well into his seventies now, and in spite of not working from a big shop or having large output he's sought after. Many many "famous name" luthiers learnt from Carl or worked in parallel with him in NY. He's a great honest luthier, and a mine of information and anecdotes. Shame that the video quality wasn't too hot.
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  43. Double oops I forgot to answer your question about the truss rod cover, Shay. I make a veneer out of ebony and inlay the logo with white mother-of-pearl. Sand it down smooth and then cut it out to the shape I want. on my 22 special build that I entered in the December guitar of the month contest I used blue paua abalone instead of mother of pearl
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  44. Sounds like you aren't a big fan of Ben Crowe ;-) But how do you know that I don't have head tattoos even worse than his? ;-) I picked up some useful information from his videos. I could wish he didn't ramble on quite so much though ;-). The things that I found to be of the most value are more along the lines of the tips and tricks stuff as opposed to general guitar building techniques The masking tape and CA glue trick instead of double stick tape in particular was probably the most awesome thing I've learned from his videos. That trick alone was worth all of the time I've spent watching his videos 😀
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  45. Also, beware of instructional videos where the person has several band-aids on their fingers, or at least has more at the end of the video than they started with.
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  46. OK, first rate tip here! Sanding a finish is one of the parts of a build that I really look for ways to streamline the process (because I hate it!) I'm gonna give this a shot I really like how this build is turning out. You do as well making it up as you go along as many do with careful pre-planning
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  47. Hi guys - new guy here, but not new to wood adhesives. Titebond and all other PVA's utilize the air in the wood to dry it when its locked inside a large expansive joint. This is why a joint will really grab very quickly during long tenon insertion, or when you try to shift pcs flush. I have had to use bar clamps to shift panels into flush when the "grab" bites me in the ***. So that is part of the answer there - usually can take clamps off a PVA glueup in a half hour due to this grab issue. But what about uneven surfaces in which your clamp pressure is holding it together til the glue dries? I would do a "prewetting" and keep clamps on for over an hour. Always remember that adhesives soak into the fibers a bit, and can starve a joint unless you re-apply immediately prior to clamping (called pre-wetting in the epoxy world). This performs several advantages: Obviously prevents starvation, so do it anyway so you aren't wondering if there is enough later The excess glue functions as a lubricant to prevent all the problems mentioned above with the "grab" issue. Impregnates the wood better with adhesive, thus stronger joint. WWAAAAYYY important when gluing end grain - which is often present even when flat laminating like your maple cap on the LP mahogony body - if there is figure to the grain. Didnt see any, but this principle is very true in fiddleback maple. 50% of the surface is actually end grain. Personally, I would laminate with epoxy. Then you don't get glue creep telegraphing the joint line on gloss finishes.
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  48. I take some 400 grit 7X 3M paper and cut a couple sheets to fit a foam sanding block. Then I rub the faces of those sheets together. This knocks the sharp edges of the grit off and leaves paper that cuts more like 600 or 800 grit. But the spacing of the grit is still 400 and the bottom line is it barely loads up with sanding dust at all. And it does not leave deep sanding scratches. It does do a nice job of gently leveling orange peel, thick areas, dust nibs and the like without cutting so fast you worry about sanding through. So......after: And back to hanging and curing for another week. SR
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  49. The lacquer has been curing for a week. Before it gets any harder, I'm going to blend it into the neck, which got a few coats of oil 3 or 4 weeks ago. Here the masking is peeled away. I put some lacquer thinner on a rag and scrubbed at the edges of this. It cut the clear some but was not getting all of that edge knocked off. So I sprayed some Behlen Jet spray bluch remover on the rag and that worked like a charm. After a week of curing, I like to break the surface of the clear and help it outgas. Before: SR
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  50. Thank you for the kind words, everyone! The inlay isn't perfect, but it was a lot of fun as a mini project to build my motivation. I tend to hit snags and then procrastinate a LOT whilst I decide on a safe course of (corrective) action. The body binding was giving me grief, particularly with the prospect of carving. I had also sanded it quite thin gap in spots and UHU Hart glue was giving me mixed results (not to mention some CA glue that soaked into the body and would have rejected stain). I decided to simplify things by routing the top down to flat, tearing the original binding out, and then repeating the binding stage. I used a well-prepared binding and acetone paste, which I'm far more confident with as a method and gave tidier results; no gaps as such, just two spots with questionable adhesion. The replacement binding was also a lighter shade of red - the same colour as the neck binding and perhaps from different ABS stock - and was far less brittle. Anyway, a few shots: I'll trim the tenon down and get the neck pocket routed when I go back home over the next couple of weeks... in 2017!
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