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  1. 10 points
    Well that went well. Feedback was it sounded clear, deep and punchy. Played well with lovely neck, so can't ask for more. Heres a snap of Marshall I Henry playing it on the pyramid stage! Very humbled to have one of my instruments used here not just in my little studio.
  2. 9 points
    So late last year I started in on a new model based around a Super Strat that I ultimately named the Helix. I wanted to incorporate some things I like in a guitar such as a super thin neck profile, a deeper cutaway, magnetic truss covers and a thinner body and a few other minor things. When I started building the first Helix I broke out the video equipment and documented the entire process. To anyone who's done it you know shooting a build by yourself is a time consuming task. Stopping at each step of the build process to set up a camera slows down the build process considerably. On some tasks it would take me longer to set up the camera than it would to actually complete the task at hand. Over the eight weeks or so it took to complete the build I shot something in the neighborhood of 40 hrs worth of footage. The build was completed late last year but the footage has been sitting untouched on my hard drive for months. With 40 plus hours of footage it was a time consuming task just to roll through and view all the footage I shot just once to see what I had, let alone organize it all and edit it all down to a point to where its viewable. Anyways, after many hours of shooting, months of procrastination and many tedious nights in front of a computer I finally have the first installment complete. Now that I'm at the editing stage I plan on releasing a new installment each week until the series is complete. So with that being said I give you the first 6 min installment of my Helix build series. Part one. ~JW
  3. 8 points
    I had posted this with a bunch of other guitars in an earlier thread, but wanted to split this out on its own. Not a typical 335 as the body and sides are I piece of Black Korina, took a while to hog it all out. The back is carved the same as the top and I put the toggle switch on the top horn. neck is flame maple with a cocobolo fretboard and headstock veneer. Top is a rescued piece of "ambrosia" quilt, had a couple of cracks I had to stabilize, but had awesome natural colour. yesterday was finally nice enough to paint, and I kind of went with the seat of my pants with the colors....
  4. 8 points
    Here's my polishing kit: micro mesh and an automotive buffer. SR
  5. 7 points
    I decided that it might be a long time before I got another opportunity to make a headstock as unique as this one, so I think I'll forego the cap.....unless I decide it just doesn't work after the guitar has been assembled, at which point I shall likely curse and thrash about as I add a cap to a fully shaped headstock, which will be entirely more difficult. towards that end I removed the ledge I had created for the nut and will cut a new one after the fretboard has been located. I added a few coats of Tru-oil to the handle. It darkened the ziricote a bit, but should protect it from whatever mess my brother in law may subject it to. You may have noticed that I also have cut the top. I am itching to cut the fretboard, but am waiting for some new bandsaw blades that should have arrived but appear to be caught up in the holiday package delivery log jam.I had some bridge height corrections to make on the mandolin because I didn't take into account how much thickness I would lose while flattening the gluing surfaces of the top and body. While I'm waiting for new bandsaw blades I am preparing those surfaces prior to determining my neck angle and tenon depth. Cheers! SR
  6. 7 points
    After a bit more leveling, yet still matte, I had to have a few in the sunlight. This is closer to actual color...but still a bit hot from the direct sunlight. SR
  7. 7 points
  8. 7 points
    Clamps off. I'll take that. It's looking a bit like a guitar now.
  9. 7 points
    Today's job was cutting the saddle slot. I used the Dremel with the precision router base and a 3mm bit: Rigged up a guide jig with thin packers that would ensure that it stayed level and flat when clamped down: Then clamped it, checked it all and slotted it: Drilled a hole from the slot to the cables channel build into the neck and put in the piezo element for a trial fit: Shaped the bone nut blank and strung it up. And blow me! The flipping thing actually intonates properly!!!!
  10. 7 points
    Aaaand back to the body Pickups and neck pocket routed: 1/4" radius for the back: Binding channel (forgot to take pics during the actual binding process): Once binding is done, break out the medieval rasp and companion scrapers: Ok, this one is fully caught up now, minus a few photographically uninteresting stages of sanding. The fretboard was sent off to be blind slotted via CNC, I should have it in hand by the middle of this coming week. Thanks for taking a look!
  11. 7 points
    Custom KM-I carve-top finished - Wenge on Mahogany body, 5-piece Maple/Purpleheart neck, Ebony fretboard, Floyd Rose Original, Schaller M6 tuners, BKP Miracle Man (bridge)/Cold Sweat (neck) and Tru-Oil gloss finish... That Ziricote top will be next... Then some new stuff coming...
  12. 7 points
    Heel carving... with a gouge, a rasp and sand paper.
  13. 7 points
    I'd like to make a comment about the line under your nitro on the body. I'm on builds number 2 and 3, not a very experienced luthier, but a VERY experienced furniture maker. What happens is that people use Titebond or Elmer's yellow glue or equivalent for edge gluing 90% of the time, and these glues cure by losing the water. The glue hardens in hours, but the water soaks into both pieces being glued, swelling them slightly at the joint, and wicks away in days or weeks until the moisture content at the glue line matches the rest of the plank. You can plane the wood you have glued up in a matter of hours, but the wood immediately adjacent to the glue line will shrink very slowly afterward and you'll see that slightly sunken line. What to do about it? Plan A is to let it dry for at least a week before you plane the wood. The defeats the whole purpose of using a fast drying glue. Plan B is to use a glue that does not introduce water to the joint. I use System 3 T-88 two part epoxy on anything that needs to come out beautiful, including my first bass, which was done almost entirely with epoxy. Others use West Systems epoxy, which I also might go for except that I could never finish the big containers they sell it in (for a lot of $$$) before it went bad. Don't use the 5 minute stuff--the slow drying epoxies have much higher strength. Another product with a good reputation is Smith's Oak and Teak Epoxy Glue. Epoxy likes a slightly rough surface at the joint and not huge clamping pressure, but these glues are very strong and thus very forgiving. When you figure 8-12 hour drying time, they are FAST compared to a one-hour glue that needs a weeks or more to dry out perfectly at the glue joint. I might use Titebond II for things like headstock veneer gluing where the temporary moisture increase will not cause that visible problem, but never for edge gluing on a visible surface. Why? because I have seen this same issue on table tops and been really disappointed. Another benefit is that you get at least 20-30 minutes of working time, so epoxy is great for a complex glue-up where Titebond would be setting up while you're applying the clamps. One more thing. In West System epoxy or any product where the resin and hardener are sold separately, you can save some money because the shelf life of the resin is many years. (Epoxy resin is BPA, a notorious endocrine disruptor which you can Google of course, so use gloves when you apply it). It is the hardener that ages out in a year or two and that can be replaced without throwing away the whole quart or gallon of resin. So maybe I'll try West Systems next time I run out. Last comment: you can tint epoxy (also Titebond actually) with a few drops of Transtint dye to match darker woods, like ebony, walnut bubinga, etc. Hope this helps! John
  14. 7 points
    this is close to being finished...redwood is becoming my favorite wood for tops...i
  15. 7 points
    Hi all, this one is now done (except for a final setup and a cavity cover. SO pleased with it and a huge thank you to all who commented and offered advice. I really appreciate it. I also managed to get it photographed, which is rare for me. I would absolutely love to hear your thoughts. Now, off to start a superstrat, with a spalted maple top...
  16. 7 points
    Welcome to this episode of spot the guitar!
  17. 7 points
    I've been having too much fun building..kinda forgot about this whole internet thing :-)
  18. 7 points
    It's a beautiful sunny spring morning here in the English midlands and I couldn't resist a couple of piccies... Another couple of "flow" coats on - unfortunately not quite as clean this time and introduced a small curtain on the backside of the lower horn. It might polish out, but might need knocking back and going over again. I'll ponder it. The front is looking pretty darned spangly though!
  19. 7 points
    HAD A BABY!!!! It's a boy! Keegan Ash Deagle! 8 lb 10 oz. So far moma bear and cub are doing awesome! still has his days / nights mixed up... but getting there... In other news, I was able to get the frets in and start prepping for the back carve... hoping to get a little time to work on that today... almost ready for finish... then I have to find a place to hid the thing for a few weeks till X's birthday. also found a local place to buy 1 amp slo-blo fuses. my AX-84 high gain Frankenstein amp is blowing the fuse as soon as it's plugged in... the only things connected before the standby switch is flipped is the power cable / fuse / standby switch. you'd expect to find a short in there... but the multi meter reads none... so I basically have to start de-soldering items until I find the culprit... hopefully it's jus the switch and I can order a new one easily.
  20. 7 points
    And that about catches y'all up to where I am at at the moment. Except for this new build Me and the lady just found out started a little while ago. I think this will be the best one yet!
  21. 6 points
    Finished: Custom 8-string KR3 - Buckeye Burl top on Swamp Ash body (wings), Wenge/Maple 3-piece thru-neck, Marblewood fretboard, ABM 3210s, Hipshot Grip-lock, BKP Painkiller (custom 16 degree baseplate) w/ aged cream coils...
  22. 6 points
    I decided to put a rose also on the headstock, to complement the inlay on the fretboard. This drawing is smaller than the others, because the flower has to go between the machine heads. I decided to inlay on the headstock also a drawing: the logo Delky. It's just a joke from school times, a nickname from my surname Del Col. The leaves are made with abalone paua, the petals are made with white mop and australian greenlip abalone. The contrast between the different colours of the shells helped me to give more depth to the rose. The writing is made with golden mop. As you can see on the picture, I always print several copies of the same subject, because each time I cut a piece of paper I ruin adjacent pieces. In the photo you can see the effect of the two shells used for the petals: the lighter stuff is white mop, the darker is australian greenlip abalone. Here is the writing made with golden mop. And this is the final effect when everything has been inlayed. I've also completed the flamed maple binding on the headstock. I have to improve my skills to cut miters
  23. 6 points
    For this guitar I wanted to do an intricate inlay and I choose one of my favourite subjects: roses. I started making inlays three years ago and it was immediately love with this technique. Most often I do small subjects like logos or writings, so this one is my second full fretboard inlayed. On the twelfth fret I decided to inlay a small ladybug (from which the name of the guitar) to vary a little and to create a colorful subject that stood out on the rest of the inlay. The drawing of the layout is always the most demanding part: I draw by hand, first looking for subjects, then marking them out with a pencil and finally creating the composition. This is a photo of an intermediate phase: frets 1-9 The final result is really similar to those drawing for children to fill with coloured pens When I have the final layout I cut all small pieces gluing them to mop, abalone, recon stones... and I start cutting with a jeweler saw. Here is the ladybug: red recon stone, ebony and white mother of pearl. She has no legs, cause they will be cut on the "leaf" where she will lay and later filled with epoxy mixed to ebony dust. Now the work is really repetitive: cut the piece, glue to mop, cut the mop, file blurry edges and start again. Sometimes pieces are really small! When I finish to cut all the pieces for a subject I glue them together, being careful non to leave gaps between the pieces. In the end this is the final result: approximately 250 tiles. Now is time to route the fretboard and inlay everything: to do it I use a Dremel with an aluminum base. All parts are glued with epoxy mixed to ebony dust which at the same time serves as glue and filler. This required near to 100 hours to complete. Cutting frets on this fretboard was really stressful! I don't have photos for next steps, but I bound the fretboard with the same flamed maple used for the body binding, I installed the frets and finally glued the fretboard on the neck.
  24. 6 points
    Next steps were binding and purflings. To cut the channels with the arm router was an easy task The most difficult part was to cut the channel on the cutaway, because in that position the channel doesn't lay on a plane, but it goes up after the horn and then goes down near to the neck pocket. To achieve it I used this jig with my Makita hand router The channel wasn't perfect, because the radius was too narrow for the jig to work correctly, but after some refining with a chisel it was acceptable. My aim was to do a flamed maple binding and a four parts purfling: ebony/golden mop/ebony/maple. Instead of using Zipflex for the central purfling, I decided to do it the old way, using teflon strips and then filling the resulting channel with mother of pearl strips. This is what I wanted to achieve: First of all I prepared the binding: I cut the maple 1.5mm thick and 6mm large, then I glued a subtle strip of ebony under, so I could have a black purling line between the maple binding and the ash body Now it was time to glue the purflings, using the teflon strip instead of mother of pearl. Teflon doesn't stick with glue, so later it could be easily removed. Then I glued the binding and when the glue was dry I removed the teflon strip. In the next photo It's possible to see the void channel left by the teflon strips and the golden mother of pearl strips that I used to fill it. As I pressed the strips inside the channel, they break in smaller pieces, so they could adapt to all the curves of the guitar: I only had to cut to perfect size the portion on the horn, because there the radius was too narrow to achieve a good result with this technique. Once inserted in the channel, I glued in position the strips with thin ca glue. Now I only had to sand everything flush. The process was long and tricky but I was really happy with the result!
  25. 6 points
  26. 6 points
    In the bright sunlight. And with the first coat of Tru-Oil. SR
  27. 6 points
    Still a lot a details to see to, but I'd say it was a pretty good weekend of work. There is something about the proportions of this that I really like. SR
  28. 6 points
    And the 'as near as makes no difference finished' shots. Forgive the self-indulgence:
  29. 6 points
    Looking at the weather forecast looks like I can start spraying clear tomorrow. Meanwhile: I got some Z-poxy recently from LMI to try as a pore filler, since the swirl is going onto the neck on the back and everything will be finished with full gloss clearcoat I figured I need to pore-fill the neck and headstock. Testing Z-poxy - rubbed in one coat, sanded back with P400 the following day, then another coat and sandback. Here's coat nr 2 right after application: Also, pickguard. A weird strat needs a weird pickguard: I'll probably use this as a testpiece before I make the proper one out of plexi - there are a few small cosmetic problems with this one.. but I want to have the guitar ready to play it in a show we're doing on July 15th so I'll most likely use this one then. Afterwards I'll see. Here's the hardware in place - I got 7-string singles wound for me by Zbigniew Wróblewski of Merlin Pickups (merlinpickups.com, a boutique Polish pickup company, Polish bands like Riverside and Vader use these for example). The plan is to connect them in series with an in/out-of-phase option, following Brian May's Red Special wiring, here instead of using 6 switches I can get the same set of combinations with 3x on-on-on DPDT switches. I also looked at the Red Special layout and tried to roughly position the pickups in similar spots along the strings to have similar phase cancelation+enhancement effects, for the treble strings I'm pretty close, then I diverge a bit (I didn't want to slant too much). Finally - a mockup:
  30. 6 points
    I made a lot of progress this weekend. I did like Pariahrob suggested and I made the bevel so it exposes the alder and I have to say that it was a GREAT suggestion. I'm really pleased with how it turned out, but it took a LOT of elbow grease to carve that wenge . I finished slotting the fingerboard and routed-it to shape. I also started working on the padauk neck (as you can tell by all the dust in the background). I'll be moving to my new house this week so I probably won't make any progress on both of my builds until I've set-up my new workshop.
  31. 6 points
    Just realised I've had this sitting around finished for some time now, so without further ado I give you the following: Needless to say, I'll be steering clear of painted finishes for a while now.
  32. 6 points
    Not updated in a while but I've been busy. Top jointed and glued on. Initial routing done. I didn't use a template for the neck pocket but used the laser and two bits of wood to make a temporary guide, with two layers of tape to make a tight fit. Pickup cavities done and first pass at my body carve is done. A lot more work to do carving but for not much noticeable change. Just cleaning contours and smoothing now. Oh and decided on my f hole shape and mostly finished that. Needs refining but v pleased with the results so far. Also need to chop the section of neck out for the pickup. That's making me nervous! Measured lots and drawn it on and feels like v little wood left. The part under the pup will be 9mm thick. I guess the sides will help there. Eek!
  33. 6 points
    The controls will be hidden from the front and accessible at the back. I will have a powered piezo/mag pre-amp cum mixer and then, as a minimum, a blend and master volume. I might be able to incorporate a tone too if I can find a suitably small stacked pot. This is where they are supposed to fit: Bearing in mind that I still have to scoop 5mm or so from the back, it doesn't leave a lot of depth. Because I'm working towards the top - probably a thickness of 7mm max, I've gone for Forstner and chisels again. I've done the knobs chamber - now you see them: ...and now you don't: Then started on the main chamber. I reckon I've got another 3mm to go, with a lot of tidying of the carve too! Mind you - at least I got the cable channel in the right place With apologies to Scott for the poor carving so far: Talking of carving, you will have deduced, no doubt, that once the back is scooped and shaped, the control chamber cover will need to be carved too!!
  34. 6 points
    well KEA my build is basically the opposite of your super-clean ones but do build more! Last week after fretting I did a quick alignment check by locating the outer bridge saddle holes and checking that the strings run parallel to the fretboard edges and that I can set intonation ok. All appears to be fine so I can continue So now the neck, heel, volute etc. So far I build almost only bolt-on guitars so I don't have the process down for carving the heel. ok, this is kind of in the direction I want it to go, but not exactly. The transition from the neck to the body starts pretty early. I took a look at my Mayones Regius to compare, and there the neck retains its profile pretty much until the cutaway actually starts. It's a slightly different thing since there only the back is rounded over, but still. This is a bit closer: I need some tools for the future, probably at least a good quality rasp. Right now its going rather slow, but I'm getting somewhere. The volute is almost done, the purpleheart/maple accenting came out pretty cool: and the heel: Now I think I'll smooth the body a bit and shoot some primer, with this blotchy mess I cant see anything. Plus the super soft pine all over the place freaks me out, I fart and it dents. Oh well.
  35. 6 points
    The better I get at sharpening and using chisels, the more I use them in preference to the 'you-can-destroy-everything-in-seconds' router. The slot here will be where the tuner block butts up against the body wing. I'm pleased with this feature - it really does mean the tuner block isn't going to go anywhere and is not reliant on the fixing screws at all for strength . This is basically how the block will fit: The pencil marks shows the positioning of the neck. Not that there will be a rebate at the top and the bottom of the body. You can see the top one here - the top wing is glued and the bottom wing not yet glued: The top rebate is where the full-length fretboard will slot into and the similar rebate at the bottom is where I will carve up to the neck to create the back curve. You can see also here the slot where the strings, attached to an upside down tuner block attached to the rear block, will come through the neck and through the fretboard. Next is to sit and think and plan and think again. I need to make sure ALL of the control run slots, etc, are properly thought through and in place before I glue that bottom wing on!
  36. 6 points
    Messing around with fretboard blanks and a few off cuts. The flame is quite strong on this maple. Not sure if ill use it for this guitar, but I quite like. Reminds me a bit of the pavement on Copacabana
  37. 6 points
    the part I guess I am still not sure about is the bottom of the fretboard between where the neck angle starts and the bridge- its almost like (in my mind) the bottom of the fretboard would be flat until that neck angle- and then it would (if it was to be snug to the body and not overhang the body) have to angle forming a triangle from the neck angle to the bridge (I think?)- very interesting. you have my interest peaked big time on this. As far as your body radius- have you sorted out how you will do that? I had to do a 25" radius in a Turner Model One copy I did a few years ago- here is a pic- I laid out mdf board- held a 25" piece of string down at a center point off the board- took a pen and swiped the radius across the boards. made a "ghetto style extremely large" fretboard radius jig and went to town. that was a ton of fun. and clean up was easy with a little sanding and it came out great. (the jig was turned 90 degrees before use )
  38. 6 points
    So here is the first casting of the "quilted" acrylic. I strafe-coated the topography - gold from bottom, silver boro from top. The two tone effect is not lighting - its actually gold on one side of the "quilt billows" and silver on the other side.
  39. 6 points
  40. 5 points
    Context: I'm fairly new to the ProjectGuitar community, and to guitar building, though I've played for 35ish years, and have been woodworking for 25ish. I've done a few repair/restoration/modification projects on electrics, acoustics and ukes, and am embarking on my first full, from-scratch electric build. I'm building it with my son (which, of course, is super fun for me) who has recently gotten serious as a player, and is interested in learning a little about the build process as well. Here's some shots of the shop, which I recently reorganized to be more guitar friendly (previous focus had been classic car restoration - '74 Fiat Spider, '69 Fiat Spider, '69 VW Beetle). And this is us: What we're thinking: It will be a pretty straightforward Les Paul, though we may take some liberties with the pickup configuration and the headstock design. We have African mahogany for the body base and the neck, maple for the top, and a nicely figured wenge for the fretboard. We might use the wenge to veneer the headstock too, but that's still an open discussion at this point. We're going to do an traditional carve on the top, most likely using the angle grinder with carving disk approach as opposed to the router and sander approach or the gouges and chisels approach. What we've done so far: The build is just getting started. We've been studying plans (and making our own where we need them), making templates and gluing up blanks. We dutifully searched the internet for Les Paul plans and dimensions, and started our design from there. We found most of what we needed, with the exception of good dimensions for the neck. So I extrapolated from what I had and drew up the neck myself. We've made MDF templates for the body, including one to use for routing the body itself, and for the electronics cavities. The other is for routing the weight relief cavities, and the neck cavity. If this build goes well, we have enough mahogany and wenge to make another one, so hopefully these templates will have a future as well. We've cut out and glued up the blanks for both the base and the top. The boards came S3S from Cherokee Wood Products in Upland, CA, and it only took a little tuning with the plane to get the edges flat and square for gluing. What's next on the agenda: Laying out the neck and getting it rough cut from the mahogany board is our next step. The new band saw just came yesterday, so I have some set up and tuning to do on the tool before we put the blade into our good wood, but hopefully by the end of the weekend we'll be ready to start thinking about cutting the body shapes out of those blanks. Hope you'll enjoy following along with us. We'll be glad to hear any input, suggestions and ideas. Cheers! -- se
  41. 5 points
  42. 5 points
    Yeah, filing another patent. dammit. Another $15 grand. Still recovering from the last patent I filed. Don't ask how this is made. Going with a black TransTrem on this one, once I perfect the lamination and cut it into a guitar face. Info on these builds can be found on my other threads. The guitar bodies in the pics are for scale (but they look cool too). The unidirectional fibers EXACTLY replicate the light refractive properties of quilted figure found in quilted maple and quilted mahogany (when they are molded in my patent pending process). Quilted gold coming next.
  43. 5 points
    Maple top maybe? Project kickoff beer.
  44. 5 points
    Yes - it's a little bit special. We were in a remote part of Skye. It took 10.5 hours to drive from the midlands. Worth it, though: This is just to prove that I may be an old git, but I can still clamber up the side of a mountain...albeit like a very old goat...
  45. 5 points
    Here is one other project i didnt really plan on. My local wood store got in some 8/4 zebrawood, and i had always wanted to do a zebrawood carved top.
  46. 5 points
    Thanks Scott, glad you like my choices... I'm not fan of maple tops and trying to find a wood which looks simple, elegant and doesn't need any kind of stain, dye or sunburst... but I must say that there is some randomness in the process, as you never know what you will get from Madinter. I've ordered a Madagascar rosewood top and they sent an Indian one. But I'm happy with it, I think it looks awesome as soon it gets some spirits on it. Glueing and routing was a hard job, but life is easier with a robosander, I highly recommend it. So this is ready for neck attachment, which means "I need a neck"...
  47. 5 points
    There is then many days planing scraping and sanding to go, but to illustrate broadly what I'm trying to achieve, started the rough sanding to eventually get the body too at a 20" radius and flush with the fretboard: Long way to go before getting to the 20" radius, but this gives maybe a hint of the final shape of the top: ...and once the top is sorted, I will cut the controls chamber at the back and then scoop out the back to head towards the contact lens shape
  48. 5 points
    Ok - I didn't want to be the forum noob that went straight off topic on his first post, but having been asked... Here's the '69 Fiat. And here's the '69 beetle. Start, Finish, and a pic of the proud owner. Basically, the older son is into cars, so at 16, we built him a car. The younger is son is into guitars, so we're building him a guitar. Lucky for me, I'm into both And one parting shot... We now return you to your regularly scheduled programming.
  49. 5 points
    ...and funerals, where the dead can no longer hear them and the living are already crying. SR
  50. 5 points
    Alrighty gentlemen. Had some progress happen this weekend. I've been avoiding gluing the fretboard on for quite a while... had some issues on my last build and it didn't go 100% to plan so overcompensated this time around... wound up with a 10000% straight neck tho... so I think i'll do it this way again.... Also finished the round over on the back side of the body + the binding channel on the front side... the arm contour was a complete hooker to do. I don't have one of them fancy jig's that follows the contour so I wound up marking the channel with a pencil and routing the channel in steps (you can see via the burning) then I cleaned it up with a chisel... my old school tool skills... are... well... severely lacking... so im rather proud of myself on this one.... sadly, I may run out of time on this build... gremlin #2 is due any day now... that's likely to put a severe hamper on my progress... as long as I fnish before may (his b-day) i'll be aiet... but figured I couldn't leave you all in the dark about my super secret finish..... took our little guy out to a fabric store here in town and let him pick out some fabric.... glued down with super 77 and filled with weldbond and leveled (Im trying desperately to avoid epoxy due to the fumes). all that's left is to clearcoat over with some waterbased polyurethane that I bought.... should look absolutely SICK once completed..... and it's spiderman,... so the little guy's gonna lose his nuggets....
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