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MzI

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MzI last won the day on March 26 2015

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About MzI

  • Rank
    Metal MilitiA
  • Birthday 09/04/1983

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  • Location
    Hangar 18
  1. Top looks great, how long did it take to carve on the CNC?
  2. Generally, 2x4s are white pine or doug fir, usually 2x8 and up are SYP from good lumber yards. If your concerned about the brightness of maple, turn the tone down on the guitar or use a different pickup imo. The neck is the last place I'd scarifice structural integrity to gain warmth of tone. From my experience, walnut is not even close to the brightness of maple, more in the range of mahogany. I have a few guitars that are solid maple and a combination of maple and northern hard ash, bright as can be, and even with a SD JB in the bridge position they are great for cutting through the distortion and maintaining clarity on the lower tunnings. If I have them tuned to standard E I role the tone knob back a bit and they aren't overly harsh. Just make sure any SYP you use is dry. Most that I find from lumber yards is construction grade, more in the 15% to 20 % range and not 5% to 8%
  3. Yellow pine and standard white pine are two completely different woods. I am building a timber frame house right now, the frame is out of southern yellow pine. It is a very hard dense wood, to the level of traditional hardwoods such as hard maple, not quite, more comparable to mahogany. If you find a nice tight grain piece I don't think you would have too much problem with it as a neck. On the other hand Hard maple is so cheap, why use anything else.
  4. If the heel is located at a certain point to serve as a stop for the hand from sliding too far down the neck that is one thing but to have it so far away from the body inhibits playing the upper frets unless you have monster hands.
  5. Haven't had any time lately. That's why no build thread or any decent pictures. The one of the front was actually from a wood working show a couple weeks ago.
  6. Evil Spalted Maple Top w/ Honduran Mahogany Back 7 Piece African Mahogany and spalted maple neck w/ scarf joint 24 3/4" scale 22 Fret w/ Bloodwood Fretboard SD Jazz pickup, Abr-1 w/ strings thru
  7. Here's two pictures of mine. The color has not changed and these pictures are from a few years after the guitar was completed. Not that it gets any sunlight on it anyways. I used Martin Senour 2 pack Automotive Poly. The neck is finished in Minwax PAste finishing wax and has held up quite well without any recoats of the wax
  8. I made a 59 Flying V out of all purple heart, neck included, it weighs in around 11 or 12 pounds. I don't play it standing up much though it does balance well, usually sit down on the couch with it.
  9. Autocad is by far the best for drawing plans, there is a reason why its the industry standard for architects. Another more cost effective option is progeCad or Intellicad
  10. I think the black hardware works good as is. Going with chrome or gold hardware or cream pickups really takes the focus away from the wood itself and with such an over the top piece of walnut like that, that would be that last thing I'd want.
  11. Go with a clear pickguard if you are going to put one on there, otherwise its a waste of a perfectly good flame top.
  12. Quilted Birdseye Maple with mineral staining. Not a clue what I am going to do with it. The board is 5' long with some warping and twisting so its sitting for that rainy day project.
  13. Looks great. Chrome truss rod cover would finish it off nicely. The strap button on the back of the body may be an issue. The one on my Gibson Flying V is located in the same spot and constantly impedes the upper fret access.
  14. I would remove the strip from the top all together. It takes too much away, visually, from the great spalt you have.
  15. All things considered, this one took me just under 4 years. Other things come up here and there. Anyways without further delays here are the completed pictures. Another great learning experience. This was my first using binding on the neck as well as first asymmetrical carve on the neck. Both came out halfway decent. This was also my first using Tru Oil for the whole guitar, it will also be my last. It works great on the neck without a doubt, but I am not sold on a body finish with it. As far as tone goes, this is the first time I've used Ash, it is quite bright tone wise which is always a plus in my opinion, and it is fairly heavy, more so then my Mahogany Gibson Flying V.
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