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RestorationAD

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RestorationAD last won the day on March 10

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About RestorationAD

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    80s BMX Bandit
  • Birthday 10/06/1971

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    rtp, nc ... IT never never land.
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  1. RestorationAD

    Not Quite A Tele...

    This. props. \m/
  2. RestorationAD

    The Black Queen

    So basically I can probably hit the k for each. I have a plan for lack of a bobbin. Just can't manufacture the covers. If we found a cheap rip off I might be able to replicate them....
  3. RestorationAD

    The Black Queen

    I understand the "Red Special" thing. I have the same fondness for "Old Boy" (Iommi's main axe). I am thinking I can replicate the coils as I have a knack for the impossible. I can source the A2 magnets. The problem is the beautiful chrome covers. Anyway here is some more since we all decided to brain dump in @komodo thread. More info Regarding the coils - all early European pickups (Hofner / Framus / Hoyer etc..) were built this way. The coil is wound on a removeable chassis - and then completely wrapped in a special armature winding tape (takes ages to learn this - they are ridiculously delicate!). The whole thing is pulled tight - just like lacing up your boots. The magnets are vintage ceramic (similar to Alnico 2). They have been out of production since the early seventies - I have to have them custom made - and they cost a fortune!!! The coils are then placed arround the bar magnets (the holes in the chrome top covers are purely aesthetic). The whole thing is then glued solid to prevent the brass top covers from causing howling. This is exactly how they were made 40 years ago - and they sound great!!! Many thanks for your enquiry. Our pickups are identical re-creations of Tri-sonic pickups built between 1960-65. We use the exact build methods and original components - they are even wound on the original late 50's Burns winding machine, making them the most accurate version of this classic pickup - period!!!!! We can easily supply a hotter bridge pickup, however on Brians guitar the "hot" pickup was in the middle position. Most Red Special experts want - neck pickup approx 6.5k, middle approx 6.9k, and bridge approx 6.7k. Apparently these figures are based on Greg Fryers restoration of Brians original guitar. Regarding pots and caps, Brian's were Omeg 220k log B pots with a .022cap, although Burns originally used 500k pots in the 60's.
  4. RestorationAD

    Project - RAD Unfinished Business

    Been there done that. Grew up in body shops/race shops and learned to paint in the late 70s through the 80s (as a puppy). I have mixed some old school nitro hot before. I learned Epoxy from the race shops.
  5. RestorationAD

    The Black Queen

    @komodo This is going to be a cool build. I have always wanted to do a project with Burns Tri-sonics. I wish I had the machinery to build a set. Several years ago I wrote Adrian Turner of Adeson Pickups who is legendary at Burns and asked about the Tri-sonic. He responded. Subject: Question about Tri-Sonic pickups. Hello, I am in the process of making some 8 string pickups for a customer and they really like the Tri-Sonic sound. I am not going to reproduce actual Tri-Sonics but I was going to review the construction method and see if I can emulate some of the sonic properties in my 8 string single coil. I realize this is an odd request but you are the most well know producer of Tri-Sonic pickups and I was hoping you could help me one luthier to another. I understand if you do not want to answer for business reasons... I assure you I am not going to start producing Tri-sonic pickups... I have done a lot of research and still can't manage to answer a few questions. Are all the pickups wound in the same direction? If not what direction is the middle pickup wound? What is the wire gauge? What is the orientation of the polarity of the magnets? Thank you so much for your time. Adeson - Adrian <> Wed, Dec 22, 2010, 3:27 PM to guitarlogistics Hi there No, I don't mind answering any questions - just don't know if it will be any help...... Firstly, original 60's Tri-sonics - were normally wound and fitted in the same direction ie: similar to an early Strat, there was no reverse wound pickup. However, Tri-sonics were actually assembled by a few different companies - so it isn't unusual to find original units/guitars wound in different directions, they were simply assembled by different companies. People tend to think that everything built by Burns came out of one large factory - this was never the case. Much of the work, especially the electronics assemblies were farmed out to outside electronics manufacturers. The original 60's units all had tape-wound coils - which utilises a specific machine - which is part of the original sound of these units - differing from most US type pickup coils. There were also three different size/types of Tri-sonic over their original production run - they weren't all the same. All of these units differed with wire gauge/magnet types etc... Each different type were destined for specific guitars in the Burns model range - so re-producing the sound/characteristics of a particular Tri-sonic means isolating a specific time-frame in original production - and matching it to that particular unit. Your customer is obviously presuming that they were all identical pickups - unfortunately, this wasn't the case. Wire gauges varied from 0.04/0.05/0.06 depending on which size pickup/instrument the pickups were intended for. Unfortunately, magnet polarity also varied between whichever company had assembled the units - as long as each unit had the same pole facing upwards, it was considered fine in those days ! Most of the confusion/clouding of these units has basically come from the "aftermarket - generic" units which have been made in the Far East from the mid 80's onwards. These are just simple traditional single coil units with a large block magnet and a simple coil wound on a basic bobbin in a lookalike "over heavy" casing. Unfortunately these units have very little in common with the original production units, and has also given people the impression that there was only one single type. Sorry to drop this on you - but you did ask..... Hope you have a good Xmas and new year...... Ade.
  6. RestorationAD

    Project - RAD Unfinished Business

    If someone gave me free gold hardware I would turn the torch on it and bake the electroplating off... and if it melted I wouldn't even feel remorse as I saved some poor unfortunate soul from owning a guitar with Gold hardware.
  7. RestorationAD

    Project - RAD Unfinished Business

    Stop. I was not. I WILL NEVER use gold hardware. Never.
  8. RestorationAD

    Project - RAD Unfinished Business

    Moar Lacquers... ? Silliness aside a serious set of heavy coats of un-thinned Behlens Instrument lacquer from an old can I don't trust anymore (turned out to be fine). Normally it is epoxy or super glue... but then I have to add a coat of shellac to make sure everything sticks. I really dislike vinyl sealer so I never use it. For this thing I just don't care. Since it is all close grained and already full of epoxy Lacquer is fine. I am going to scuff it with 400 and then shoot a color burst then more clear on top of that.
  9. RestorationAD

    Project - RAD Unfinished Business

    All the scratches are gone. 400 grit sanding done. Grain filled. Hopefully I get time to shoot some clear on it in the next few weeks.
  10. RestorationAD

    Project - RAD Unfinished Business

    Grain filler exposed the cross grain scratches left by Warmoth Monkies.
  11. RestorationAD

    Project - RAD Unfinished Business

    Decals for the Strat. We decided on Chaco as the name because it was cool and hiking in Chaco New Mexico was a great memory. In Chaco NM their is a petroglyph called the Sun Dagger (it is cool google it). SO I am adding a Sun Dagger to the back of the headstock.
  12. RestorationAD

    Not Quite A Tele...

    Not you. It is the mix. All the brands behave differently. Danish, Teak, and Tung oil recipes are all subject to interpretation.
  13. RestorationAD

    Not Quite A Tele...

    I use teak oil + lacquer a lot. I started with tung oil. I liked it but it takes too long to dry and isn't as durable as one would like. I have tried all the other oils and disliked them for various reasons. Designed for gunstocks, patio furniture, doors, end tables, etc... you get the idea. I even made some of my own with linseed oil and beeswax and various varnishes to varying degrees of success. I finally settled on using Behlen Teak Oil for the base. All teak oils are different but the idea is linseed oil, tung oil and a thinner to make them easy to apply and dry well. Behlen seems to have the best mix (Watco is second) most others are garbage. Once the teak oil is dry I move onto a film finish. Almost always use behlen instrument lacquer or minwax polyurethane. I have found that a few light coats of lacquer is nice if you want a shine and a few coats of flat or semi-gloss poly works well if you want it to look and feel like oil finish. I guess I finally answered my questions from this post. https://guitarlogistics.blogspot.com/2011/02/notes-on-oil-finishes.html
  14. RestorationAD

    Project - RAD Unfinished Business

    Not sure. Was planning on clear but I get what you mean. I will have to ask the owner what he wants.
  15. RestorationAD

    Project - RAD Unfinished Business

    I will get to them. Unfortunately, I am not making a single coil S9 for about three guitars so it may be a bit. They are on the list... single coil blades. I still have to solve the magnet problem. The set I made you had magnets that I had laying around. While this is cheap it is hard to reproduce. I have two designs in mind. One uses traditional ceramic magnets and the other uses a newer neodymium magnets. The problem I have had in the past with neodymium magnets is they usually result in a very bright clean pickup (no grit). Great for basses but not so much for guitars (unless you want really clean pickups).
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