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Ripthorn

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Ripthorn last won the day on November 8 2014

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About Ripthorn

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    Resident Physics Nerd

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  • Location
    Austin, TX
  • Interests
    Physics (I am a physicist), home recording, guitar building, guitar playing (or anything else guitar), woodworking, spending time with wife and kids.

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  1. This is my Photon prototype build. I am hobby builder, working out of my garage. I have built about 18 guitars over the last 16 years This one is a design that was inspired by the thought of something in motion and by the bevels and thinness of the SG. Because of what I wanted it to be, there are very few off the shelf parts here: the switch, pots, jack, and strap locks are the only retail parts. I designed and machined the bridge, tuners, knobs, truss rod, inlays, pickup covers and I wound the pickups as well. Some vital specs: - Zebrawood top on Sapele, 1 1/4" total thickness, grain matched cavity cover with rare earth magnets - Vertical grain Doug fir neck - Bloodwood fretboard, 24.5625-26" scale lengths - Magnetic truss rod cover - Firebird style humbuckers with A5 magnets inside of sapele/bloodwood covers - All aluminum hardware designed and machined by myself in my garage - Wave/particle duality inlays featuring photoluminescent powder inside of aluminum tubing - Separate volume controls and master 2-band passive EQ with onboard preamp - Finished with 2k gloss
  2. So many great guitars last month, I'll give this a whirl again this month: This is my Photon prototype build. I am hobby builder, working out of my garage. I have built about 18 guitars over the last 16 years This one is a design that was inspired by the thought of something in motion and by the bevels and thinness of the SG. Because of what I wanted it to be, there are very few off the shelf parts here: the switch, pots, jack, and strap locks are the only retail parts. I designed and machined the bridge, tuners, knobs, truss rod, inlays, pickup covers and I wound the pickups as well. Some vital specs: - Zebrawood top on Sapele, 1 1/4" total thickness, grain matched cavity cover with rare earth magnets - Vertical grain Doug fir neck - Bloodwood fretboard, 24.5625-26" scale lengths - Magnetic truss rod cover - Firebird style humbuckers with A5 magnets inside of sapele/bloodwood covers - All aluminum hardware designed and machined by myself in my garage - Wave/particle duality inlays featuring photoluminescent powder inside of aluminum tubing - Separate volume controls and master 2-band passive EQ with onboard preamp - Finished with 2k gloss
  3. This is my Photon prototype build. I am hobby builder, working out of my garage. I have built about 18 guitars over the last 16 years This one is a design that was inspired by the thought of something in motion and by the bevels and thinness of the SG. Because of what I wanted it to be, there are very few off the shelf parts here: the switch, pots, jack, and strap locks are the only retail parts. I designed and machined the bridge, tuners, knobs, truss rod, inlays, pickup covers and I wound the pickups as well. Some vital specs: - Zebrawood top on Sapele, 1 1/4" total thickness, grain matched cavity cover with rare earth magnets - Vertical grain Doug fir neck - Bloodwood fretboard, 24.5625-26" scale lengths - Magnetic truss rod cover - Firebird style humbuckers with A5 magnets inside of sapele/bloodwood covers - All aluminum hardware designed and machined by myself in my garage - Wave/particle duality inlays featuring photoluminescent powder inside of aluminum tubing - Separate volume controls and master 2-band passive EQ with onboard preamp - Finished with 2k gloss
  4. I actually have a piece in my stash right now that does the exact same thing. At first I thought that it looked like purpleheart, but not brownish as I expected. I cut some up to make an infill plane, and the cut ends were brown. Some of the offcut scrap that got left out turned purple. I thought it was backwards. However, I think what is really happening is that there are more than one species of tree called purpleheart, much like there are more than one kinds of maple, walnut, etc. This purpleheart I have does not splinter quite like other purpleheart I have used (and that stuff was purple fresh and brown later). So I think it is likely just that there are two species that both have purple heartwood, but that behave differently. Then again, that's only a guess, but I have used purpleheart where the color shift goes both ways.
  5. If you overlap the joints like what is done with bowling alleys and the like, you can do it, but I don't know how it would work with stability or longevity.
  6. If the block is a good fit, regular old epoxy is a great choice. If it is not a good fit, the best option is to cut a block that is. After that, and if it is to be an opaque finish, Timbermate is a great wood filler that does not have the same issues that many other fillers have as far as shrinking, cracking, staining, etc.
  7. It is best to have parts on hand, especially for your first builds. Additionally, I would say to maybe try something other than spalted maple first. Spalt is a fungus that attacks the wood, leaving it very soft (often called punky) which in turn makes it much more difficult to work with than other woods. You can try it, but it carries a higher risk of ruining a nice looking piece.
  8. You can buy the blue two way rods all over the world, as they usually ship from china. Alternatively, there is PRS's way of making two way rods, which I want to try, but it will require a brazing setup, I think. They are a very elegant solution, low mass, and easy to make at home if you have a way to braze.
  9. That all depends on what you are trying to build. If you want strat or tele templates, Ron Kirn's are really great. If you want Les Paul templates, Bartlett templates are great. Of course, not all templates will come with a neck template, mostly because a neck (aside from the headstock) requires creating two straight lines and the heel profile. I don't know of a set with neck templates that will be as accurate as you are wanting.
  10. On the subject of experiments, I am building a single pickup explorer because I want to see what a dedicated tone machine does, but I would be interested to see you take data of the bridge pickup with and without the neck pickup installed and see if there are any changes in the harmonic decay. I know some guitarists who swear that the presence of a neck pickup has a noticeable effect, and I wouldn't know because I have only ever played two or three pickup guitars. Just a thought...
  11. I will only speak from my personal experience. I have built guitars out of a variety of woods. As an experiment, I built an entire guitar out of a single white pine 2x4: body, neck-thru, and fretboard. I stuck some leftover parts on it, including pickups from an epi LP, and it sounded like a nice electric guitar. Nobody looking at it or playing it ever suspected that anything on it was pine, let alone the entire thing. I have also built a solid maple neck-thru, neck and body from the same board. Had two different fretboards on it. Sure it was a little brighter than my other guitars, but I chalk plenty of that up to the EMG's I put in it. However, on the flip side, I have one guitar that is a multi-laminate neck thru, and for the life of me, it perpetually sounds mellow, even borderline muddy. The pickups are good quality, as is the rest of the hardware. That leads me to think that the wood in this case (though most likely the massive number of glue joints, type, and quality are the culprits) plays a part. On the whole, my opinion is that if you can learn what each wood's "typical" characteristics are, you can plan with that in mind, whether it be to feature them, avoid them, or make them a non-issue altogether.
  12. I like what you are doing. However, with your three hypotheses, there is a little to be said. A guitar string being a solid material is subject to some non-linearities when it comes to picking strength. This can affect the shape of the slope of the harmonics because the damping characteristics at the beginning of the note will not be the same at the end. Also, while it is true that position will not affect the slope, when you are at a position that has a lower amplitude of a certain harmonic, your effective SNR will be low, so you may see unusually short decay times. Same can be said for pickup type, as certain types may emphasize or de-emphasize the presence of certain harmonics. However, on the whole I think you have a very good approach. Octave is a good choice. I use matlab all day every day doing acoustics work, so I know it well and love it dearly One thing you can do for your 50 Hz hum if you can't get rid of it is to do something like a 6th order Bessel high pass filter on the signal (Bessel is ideal because of its maximal phase linearity and small overshoot, tradeoff is that it has a slower slope, so you need more orders). Or you could do a linear phase FIR, but be careful about how you choose it. Good job and keep the results coming!
  13. Using them will slow down the process, but the process will happen over time anyway. There is no perfect solution to prevent fading indefinitely, but that doesn't mean it isn't worth using the UV inhibiting finishes.
  14. I haven't been able to put it down. Plays effortlessly, sounds great, and is so amazingly comfortable. The multiscale neck just plays so naturally.
  15. Necro bump! I started working on this again about a month ago. I sanded down the entire top, got rid of all the glazing putty (man, that was a dumb idea) and refinished. The top is still not absolutely perfect, but pretty darn good if you ask me. I made the pickup rings, finished the bridge, etc. Anyway, I need to take some good pics, but here is one crappy one to tide you over:
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