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Skyjerk

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Everything posted by Skyjerk

  1. Skydiving doesn't feel like that. Not even a little. That stomach sinking, "falling" sensation you get on roller coasters is caused by changing directions and acceleration simultaneously. Cresting a hill, you (and your "innards") are going up and you are decelerating, drop off the other side and you're going down and accelerating propelled by the car you are held into. Your innards want to keep going up because of inertia. The car and gravity want your innards to go down. Its the struggle between the opposing forces that cause those sensations In skydiving theres no abrupt change of direction or acceleration. When you exit the aircraft youre already going 90-100 MPH forward, You then transition to downward movement in an arc (we call this arc "the hill") as your forward motion gradually becomes downward. You only accelerate by about 10-20 MPH more and thats over the space of about 10 seconds pulled only by gravity. You dont even notice that. try accelerating in your car to 20 MPH over 10 seconds and tell me if you feel anything. I'll bet not I have gotten that feeling slightly when jumping from a hot air balloon and a helicopter, but this is because you are essentially motionless at the start. You go from 0 - 120 MPH in 8 or 9 seconds, but even then its in one direction and only accelerating at the speed gravity pulls you (9.7536 m / s2) so that feeling is barely noticeable. You tend to be more focused on other things at the time Anyhoo, its a pretty safe sport if you practice it safely. Ive been doing it 29 years. Tore a muscle in my leg once, but healed up in a few weeks. Tore my right rotator cuff (minor) only 2 weeks ago from what amounts to the least graceful landing I've ever had. It'll heal. So two minor injuries in 29 years. Not a bad safety record
  2. interesting build. It'll turn out well. The omen is that my very first parachute was called a "Cloud Delta" and it always got me safely to the ground
  3. Skyjerk

    Couldn't resist - new project

    Sweet. Theres something about that shape that reminds me of something, only I have no idea what. Not a guitar, but something. I like it Neck-through always a winner in my book, too
  4. New build. This is a similar design to the Phoenix 24 Magnum, but with some significant spec changes. This build will feature the same basic construction methods, and materials, body shape, and top carve as the 24 magnum, but this one will have 22 frets instead of 24, a 25″ scale length instead of 25.5″, a fixed TOM bridge instead of a tremolo, a 3-way toggle instead of the 5-way blade switch, a Brazilian rosewood fretboard instead of ebony, and a quilted maple top instead of flamed, and will also feature a matching quilted headstock overlay. This will be my first build using pickup covers This is the block of maple the top will be cut from. Its freakin spectacular! To the right of the wenge are 6 boards of genuine Bolivian mahogany (Swietenia macrophylla), 3 of those board will be used in this build Bridge and pickup covers. These will cover Seymour Duncan JB and 59. Heres those same covers after being soldered to a JB and a 59 An array of templates I’ll use for the build. I designed them in CAD, and a business associate in Sydney Australia cut them for me on a CNC machine. I hate making templates myself simply because its time consuming, and I just dont have that much time Brazilian rosewood fretboard blank with my bird inlays laid out on it.
  5. Skyjerk

    New Magnum build

    So, final update till I sand, buff, and assemble this baby. The top of the body and top of the headstock are good to go until final sanding and buffing since they will be a high gloss. They will get wet sanded and buffed out after a few more weeks of hardening, but as previously indicated, I decided I wanted a satin finish for the back, sides, neck, and the sides and back of the headstock Yesterday I dry sanded the entire back, sides, and neck with 600 grit until it was perfectly flat and smooth. I took some serious time with this because after shooting the satin lacquer those areas are done. No sanding or buffing those areas so they have to be absolutely perfect before you shoot, and you also have to be perfect with your spraying. The finish needs to be evenly applied and perfectly with NO SAGS, GAPS, or RUNS or you have to let it dry, re-sand the area, and re-shoot. anyhoo, I had some anxiety about it because I've only done satin before on a couple Strat necks which are a lot smaller BUT now I'm on the other side and it turned out perfect. Exactly what I hoped. So the good news for me is that in a few weeks all I need to wet sand and buff is the top of the body and headstock, and those are pretty damn flat already, so I should be able to make short work of those areas. Ignore the cover not sitting flat. I made that to tight tolerances, and the lacquer shrunk the recess just enough to keep it from dropping in. The lacquer will shrink a bit more over the next few weeks and will hopefully drop right in at that point, but if I have to do a bit of light sanding to the edge of the cover thats no big deal. Its unfinished so it'll be about 3 minutes worth of work to fit it.
  6. Skyjerk

    New Magnum build

    Do not use just any generic paint or lacquer thinner. Some will work for your product and some will ruin it Again, read the manufacturers instructions on what thinner to use for their product.
  7. Skyjerk

    New Magnum build

    By "top coat" I simply mean whatever you use as your final finish. In the case of this guitar I used aniline dyes for color on the wood, then simtec sanding sealer to seal it in, followed by toner in the form of sprayed on nitro tinted with medium brown, and finally just clear nitro. So the simtec is my sealer, the tinted nitro is my base coat, and the clear nitro is my top coat. I'm not very familiar with polyurethane coatings, but I believe they can (should) be wet sanded just like nitro, to remove orange peel, ripples, scratches, etc. I'm about 99% sure that you would not be able to shoot nitro on top of poly even if you had access to it. Different coatings can react badly with each other, or just not adhere well to each other and end up delaminating. If its not a catalyzed coating like 2K, (im assuming yours is wipe on or brush on) you should be able to apply more after wet sanding it, however it may be too viscous to settle out flat and leave brush marks, etc. I thin my final coat significantly so that it flows out nice and flat, I dont know if your product can be thinned or what it should be thinned with. You should be able to get all that information, if not from the label, then from google searches or contact the manufacturer, or look on their website. If your poly is thick enough to sand flat without sanding through to the wood, you probably dont actually need anything else. I cant say if 7 coats is thick enough yet or not. Its hard to say without knowing anything about your particular product. In my case I used 6 coats of Mohawk nitro. When I was using Behlen nitro I did 10 or 12 coats because Mohawk has a higher content of solids than Behlen, and builds faster and so requires less coats to achieve the same thickness. I've seen people achieve awesome finishes with brushed on poly, so you are probably going to be fine. Just do some research in places like this and other guitar building forums and ask questions about your specific product. I can almost guarantee there's people out there that can speak with authority about your particular type of coating and give you good advice.
  8. Skyjerk

    New Magnum build

    What are you using for a top coat? i used nitrocellulose lacquer, sprayed on with Iwata HVLP gun. Mohawk piano lacquer is my go-to producT. given that a sprayed top coat with any significant build will have some degree of orange peel that will need to be wet sanded flat once it's fully hardened. You can save yourself significant wet sanding by fully leveling it before you shoot your final coat like I described above. in a month I will wet sand the whole surface until it's perfectly smooth, starting at 800 grit. I will then repeat the entire process with 1200 grit until all the scratches from the 800 are completely gone. Following that i will buff it on my buffer with medium compound, and then again with fine compound, and finish with swirl remover. At that point it will be glass smooth and have a hard, mirror finish. generally, people that don't have a buffer will continue up through finer and finer grits with the wet sanding going as high as 2500 or even 3000 grit. Thats pretty much SOP with gloss nitro. It's never done with shooting the finish as the final step unless it's a satin finish. In my case, I'll be dry sanding the sides and back flat this weekend with 800 and shooting satin clear. For those areas that will in fact be the final step, but it has to be perfect
  9. Skyjerk

    New Magnum build

    Thank you very much i’m very happy with the way it’s turning out. The big challenge now is simply dealing with the wait while the lacquer hardens
  10. This is awesome I've always wanted to try an acoustic build, but keep finding reasons to put it off. In reality I'm just chicken. Its a whole different animal than a solid body electric. No matter how good my electrics are, I'll never consider myself a luthier until I can build acoustics...
  11. Skyjerk

    New Magnum build

    Just a different shot showing off the shape of the top. Very minor ripples and orange peel remain at this point and should wet sand flat with minimal effort. When shooting, I give the last build coats a full day to harden and then sand them flat using my random orbital sander and a 600 grit sanding disk. This literally takes maybe 5 minutes. Then shoot a final coat of clear thats thinned a lot so that it flows out nice and flat, and completely fills the scratches left by the 600 grit sanding. This 5 minutes of work at this stage saves hours of wet sanding in a month since I've already removed 98% of the orange peel. Also, I decided to finish the back and sides with a satin rather than the entire guitar being high gloss. the gloss will remain on the tops of the body and headstock.
  12. Skyjerk

    New Magnum build

    This was news to me, so I decided to look into this because I had never heard this said before, and I honestly didnt know. According to the manufacturer "TransTint® Dyes are a solution of metal-complex dyes in a special solvent". Another source says "TransTints are formulated from light stable metallized acid dyes" Aniline is apparently an organic compound. based on this, I dont think transtint is aniline, but I cant find any information that specifically says it is or is not, so while I'm leaning toward "not", I wouldn't be prepared to place a wager on it
  13. Skyjerk

    New Magnum build

    Thanks! It IS luscious, isnt it? That's a good word for it I honestly didnt expect it to turn out as nice as it did. I surprised myself
  14. Skyjerk

    New Magnum build

    Yep. I shoot 3 coats with 20 minutes in between them, and I clean the gun between each coat. I dont do a full disassemble, but I throw some acetone in the cup and give it a good swirl, open the mix all the way up till its flowing out nicely through the nozzle, then pull off the nozzle and air cap and swirl them around in a jar of acetone. Its a fairly cursory, 3 minute cleanup. Then I have a smoke or hit the head, then reassemble, mix the next batch, and shoot again. After the 3rd coat I do a full-on cleaning. Its a pain, but you DONT want any of it to kick while its still in the gun. I really dont enjoy that part at all, and its also smelly The results make it worth the hassle
  15. Skyjerk

    New Magnum build

    Oh, and I dont use my good gun to shoot this product. I use a cheap harbour freight gun with a big aperture. 1.8 or 2.0 mm. I clean up with acetone immediately after shooting it. Do NOT let it harden in the gun or you'll end up with junk. Its fairly viscous. If you use it you'll also notice a slight pinkish color to it. This does NOT affect the color of the surface you're spraying. Ive shot it over bare wood and different color stained wood and other than the darkening you would expect when spraying anything on wood, no discernible change in the tint or color of the underlying surface. Its just like if youd sprayed lacquer on it.
  16. Skyjerk

    New Magnum build

    That is the stuff. One caveat. Its very sticky and overspray that might float around will land on stuff and stick, including yourself. Nitro is easy because by the time the teeny particles land on things its already dried, and brushes right off like dust. Not this stuff. Its catalyzed, so it hardens in its own time depending on how much catalyst you add. So, the rule of thumb when I spray it is to cover anything in my shop with sheets or drop cloths.
  17. Skyjerk

    New Magnum build

    Simtec comes from http://www.simteccoatings.com/Productlist.ivnu you can only get it direct from them, but it's easy to order. I call and give them my order, shipping info, etc, and they email me a PayPal invoice. It's a great product, but it stinks I sand it to perfection. Everything 100% flat and smooth, and flat and carved surfaces, edges, corners. Like it's the top coat, but it's a lot easier to sand. then everything im shoot on top of it goes on perfectly its a godsend for mahogany and even more for swamp ash. Once you sand it flat, it will never shrink into a pore, not even a teeny bit in 100 years. Your finish stays flat like glass forever. Well, until you bang and scratch it all to hell through normal abuse
  18. Skyjerk

    New Magnum build

    Ok, now we are up to last week. these are my colors scraps from the top I used to test my finish plan I wanted a dark grain fill on the mahogany so the pores would be darker. This is timbermate mixed with dark brown dye sanded off Now on to the top. First step is to seal the faux binding area so no colors bleed or splash onto it. I seal it with thin CA brushed on, and then mask it with this sweet green masking tape. then the whole top is dyed black. In the past I've used transtint black mixed with denatured alcohol, but this time I did a test comparison using my old method on one piece, and LMII black water based aniline dye on the other Aniline on the left, transtint on the right. Aniline wins hands down. It sands down a lot faster (less penetration?) and cleaner as well. the transtint side always looks a bit dirtier. Learned somethign new here and from now on its the aniline That having been decided, I stain the whole top black with the aniline then sand the whole thing back. the trick with the tiger eye is to not sand it back too far. you want more black for this, with the clear areas being smaller. they will be bight highlights in the finished top. This was a big PITA and took a long time because I couldnt risk using an orbital sander. If you sand too far in any one spot its done. then you are re-staining and re-sanding. then, after re-sealing the faux binding with CA, and re-masking, the whole top gets a wipe with yellow aniline. Its important to not re-wipe any area once its wet again, because that will pull the black back out and wreck it. Its a wipte with yellow, then fold the cloth to a clean spot, and wipe a new area, and so on till its done. Never re-wipe over an area once its wiped. the black bleeding around into the yellow would ruin it. This process is also repeated for the headstock. which although its much less area, is a bigger PITA because the faux binding area is so much narrower. Once the yellow is totally dry I then seal the entire guitar, top, back, neck, and all using simtec easy sanding sealer. This is a sprayed on coating and really messy to work with, but its a catalized sealer and cures overnight. Rock hard, and will never shrink, sands very easily, and is totally transparent. You can use any product you want as a top coat. This sealer is key to this top. If I went on to shoot the toner directly on the stained top, the dark figure areas would drink it up and it wouldnt pull the dark toward the brown you want for tiger eye. anyway, the next step is to spray lacquer mixed with medium brown toner. I used transtint for this. You spray the top very evenly and very lightly until the toner pulls the yellow over to a more gold hue and pulls the black over to brown. I also shot a burst using the same toner, but mixed in a touch of transtint tobacco brown I didnt take pix while I was in the middle of doing all this, but here she is right after. A couple shots of the binding areas, that turned out great. Looks very different in different lighting. the previous two shots were with bright light shining directly on the top, the next one is in much lower lighting with no overhead light at all,,, Ignore he orange peel if you please Oh, and headstock.,. This headstock pic is really bad and overexposed on the binding So this is where I am now. Its going to hang and harden (this is nitro) for a month and then I'll bring it across the finish line hopefully by the weekend of Oct 27 I'll obviously post pix of the completed guitar
  19. Skyjerk

    New Magnum build

    Not a lot of pix in mid-carve. just before and after really... Before Sort of in the middle after... OK, drilling the input jack hole I use my drill press. This is for an electrosocket jack Time to make the nut. This is an unbleached bone nut blank. I rough shape this on my disk sander. Takes only a few minutes and smells really bad Here you also see the TR cover I made but did not mention before now I use the stewmac marking guide to mark where the slots need to go, These get em started At this point I really need the bridge on in order to cut the nut slots to the correct dept. Cant do that without strings, cant put on strings without bridge and tailpiece. all finished up with tuners installed, I sand the nut up to about 1200 grit and it gives it a nice luster At this point the "build" part is pretty much done. I cut the control cavity and holes for stuff and put on all the hardware because well, I wanted to see how it plays Also made a rosewood cavity cover with magnets. You'll say "Why does the grain on that cover run 45 degrees off the grain for the body. Well it started out this way because it was the only piece of rosewood I had that was the right size, but was not big enough if I aligned the grains. I decided to go ahead with it, and re-make it at some future time when I had an appropriate piece of wood. Later on I decided I actually like it this way and probably will never make another cover.
  20. Skyjerk

    New Magnum build

    This board is about half sapwood (the blonde color) and half heartwood. the dark area at the upper frets has darker lines inside it. I think this is what you are referring to? This is not uncommon in BR, I believe its called spider-webbing
  21. Skyjerk

    New Magnum build

    Installing frets. I always use stainless. This is my handy dandy fret organizer. I paid lots of money for it. Really. With stainless I radius to the exact same radius of the board. Which happens to be 12" Have to re-cut the slots in a couple places where the inlays cross the slots. I also bevel the very top of the slot, particularly where the inlays are. I dont want the barbs on the fret tang to crack the inlays I use this tool from LMII to undercut the fret wire. Binding or no binding, I just dont like seeing the edge of the frets on the side of the fretboard. Clamp to the table on my drill press and use the fret file to file the frets in flush with the board edge When preparing to install the fretboard, I stick a staple at each end of the neck, and nip them off leaving a couple short metal points sticking out. I align the freboard where it belongs and press it down onto those points, which dig into the underside of the fretboard. When I apply the glue and clamp it on, these keep it exactly where it needs to be. This is the only part I use titebond for. Its theoretically possible to have to remove the fretboard, and if I use UF for this there isnt any getting it off. All glued on.
  22. Skyjerk

    New Magnum build

    OK, inlays. these are the same birds I used for my first or second build thread here on projectguitar. I love them, but ended up selling that guitar so I needed to do another one. Carve out the outlines with a scalpel Used a trick I learned right here on project guitar to make the lines easier to spot. Chalk routed the pockets out... installed MOP side dots Starting to look like a guitar
  23. Skyjerk

    New Magnum build

    I didnt get pix of the rough carve on top. again you could see this in my phoenix build. I use a set of templates to route steps in the top that approximate the shape of the carve. then into this jig which I use to route the pickup plane. On this build the neck angle is slightly higher than the phoenix build because I'm using a TOM bridge for this as opposed to the recessed Floyd Rose on the Phoenix, so I needed more angle. In this case its 4 degrees exactly, and the pickup plane is 2 degrees exactly. Then some time with a random orbital sanded, and some hand sanding ... Add the pickup routes and take a couple glamour shots Oops. another gap in the process, but you guys all know how to radius, slot, and taper a fretboard... Incidentally, this Brazilian rosewood fretboard was reclaimed from a house where it had been used for a wall paneling. I bought the one piece and it had a tongue along one edge, and groove along the other. After I cut those off I had about 1/8" to spare at the wide end to make the fretboard. I can only imagine what that room looked like Its about 75 years old and about as stable a piece of wood as Ive ever seen, and the tap tone literally rings like a bell. Smelled like candy when I sanded it Of course at this point I had no choice but to drop the pickups into the body and do a mockup
  24. Skyjerk

    New Magnum build

    So, speaking of that top.... Getting ready to flatten and square it up... Cut off both edges... flatten and smooth on the drum sander peeled off a slice for a drop top on a different build and then resawed planing the edges before joining the top glued Draw out the shape and rough cut on the band saw I put masking tape around the body because the UF glue is REALLY REALLY hard to clean off after it cures I like to challenge myself to see how many clamps I get get on when doing a top. I think I have about 21 clamps on here. If anywhere on the top needs a tight joint for functionality purposes, its where the bridge goes. Since I dont have any clamps deep enough to reach in that far, so I have a wood caul that, which a clamp on each end, applies the clamping pressure directly onto the bridge location. Once the glue is cured (overnight) I use the spindle sander and a course grit to remove most of the excess of the top so the router doesnt have to get killed then a different spiral bit to trim the top down flush with the body edge. Giving us this Happiness is a nice tight joint between body and top. Especially when the plan is faux binding just a mockup
  25. Skyjerk

    New Magnum build

    I was very much on the fence about the finish because I wanted a tiger eye, but its a challenging finish to get right, I'd never done one before, and that piece of maple was seriously expensive. I was petrified I'd wreck it, I almost backed out and fell back to another finish I knew for sure I could pull off, but lots of folks encouraged me to go for it, so I threw caution to the winds and was rewarded with exactly what I was shooting for. I think you guys will agree. More to come shortly
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