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Found 8 results

  1. I'm starting a Fender Marauder build based on the '66 prototype. The control/bridge plates are all unique. I'm going to cut them out of a sheet of aluminum and custom cut a pickguard, My project body is set up for a Jaguar trem. I will fill in the cavity and rout for the Mustang trem. I'm thinking of using two SD P-rails pickups.
  2. I'm starting up a solid walnut Telecaster Deluxe build. The body is English walnut sides with Black American walnut center stripe. The top will be a goldtop with black pickguard and hardware. P-90 pickups with deluxe style controls. The neck will be Black American Walnut with a Rosewood board. Currently I have the body wood milled down, glued up, and rough cut to shape. The routed to shape. Got the neck milled down and roof cut. Then routed to shape and installed a Paduak skunk stripe. I will be updating this thread throughout the entire build.....
  3. Hello friends, looking for some advice about a guitar project idea i have. I want a hybrid bass/guitar, essentially a six stringed instrument where the low E and A stings are an octave down (like the E and A string from a bass) and the remaining 4 strings are like a standard guitar (D, G, B, E.) I was thinking a fender bass VI might do the trick. Using bass stings for the low E and A and regular guitar stings for the remaining 4. Does anyone know if regular guitar strings will work on the Fender VI? and if so, would i need to use a lighter sting gauge to accommodate the longer scale length? I'm also completely open to any other ideas on how to achieve the goal. thanks!!
  4. Hello guys ! Here's a video I've done a couple of days ago Tell me what you think !
  5. Straight from the factory or off the shelf, an instrument rarely has its nut slots cut to ideal depths. Generally they are always cut a little high so that the instrument is buzz free out of the gate. For most people, slightly high nut slots go unnoticed and the tougher feel to the strings near the nut gets taken for granted. Before proceeding, ensure that your guitar is correctly strung up to pitch using the string gauges you normally use on that instrument and that your neck is reasonably straight with a little relief as per the previous step in this series. Check that your fretwork is not in need of immediate attention. A neck with incorrect relief or one with uneven high/low frets cannot be improved by adjusting the nut and may give false measurements. Firstly, you need to know what type of nut you have: Standard Nuts Standard "Gibson type" nut Standard "Fender type" nut The most common nuts found on non-tremolo or non-locking tremolo designs resemble the two above. A simple block of material with evenly-spaced slots. The material varies from plastics/composites, bakelite, bone, graphite and graphite substitutes, ivory, pearl, metals, wood or more exotic materials like carbon fibre or Borosilicate glass. Regardless of the material type, the function is the same. Each string has its own slot filed to the same width. The slot has a slight backward angle so that each string firmly contacts the very front of the slot. The depth of each slot is cut to create a string path over the first frets that is high enough that strings do not buzz over them when open notes are vibrating, but not so high that fretting lower notes becomes more difficult than the rest of the neck. "Fender type" nuts are installed into a slot milled in the fingerboard itself. "Gibson type" nuts butt up against the very end of the fingerboard, usually with a very small recess to prevent movement. These two styles are found on acoustics, basses, archtops, violins or in fact virtually any strung instrument vaguely related to a guitar. Locking Nuts Ibanez RG Locking Nut The downside to the previous type of nut is friction. In use, strings can bind up in the nut slots when using a tremolo or string bending. This leaves the string out of tune and can cause "pinging" sounds as the string pops out from being bound up. Worse yet, strings slowly grind their way down lower into the nut slots, especially wound strings in softer nut materials. Eventually open strings start buzzing over lower frets. Guitars with floating/locking tremolo systems such as a Floyd-Rose commonly use a metal locking nut mechanism which clamps strings in place once tuned. Locking nuts usually comprise small metal pad or cam clamps which hold two (sometimes three) strings at at time. The nut slots are precision milled into the body of the nut itself with perfect string witness points and falloff angles at the very front of the bridge itself. Other Nut Types Some tremolo systems (eg. a retrofit Kahler) work in conjunction with a standard style of nut, instead locking the strings a short distance beyond the nut. For the most part, these remove the issues of "binding and grinding". The standard nut is adjusted the same as it would be without the additional string locking unit. Zero frets are a hybrid between a "normal" nut and a fret. An additional fret is placed at the point where the nut would normally be. A guiding nut is placed slightly further back from the zero fret whose sole duty is to manage the string spacing than to set string height. The physical advantage of a zero fret is that they provide the same string height clearances as any other fretted note; automatic ultra-low action with no maintenance! Famous examples of instruments including zero frets are the Höfner "violin" bass and unusually, Brian May's inimitable "Red Special" with it's non-locking floating tremolo system. Other styles of nut exist also, such as the Fender LSR roller nut, adjustable brass nuts, etc. These require more specific considerations whereas this article is meant to cover the most common examples; an upcoming future update will cover the more exotic styles of nut.... Measurements One by one, fret the strings at the third fret or place a capo over all of the strings at this position. Each string should have an extremely small amount of clearance between the bottom of the string and the crown of the first fret. This can be carefully observed through lightly tapping the string at the first fret with a finger and/or measuring using engineer's feeler gauges. Ideally you should have at least .002"/0,05mm of clearance under the thinnest strings and .005"/0,13mm under the heavier wound strings. Generally speaking, as long as the strings are not contacting the first fret the clearance is fine. If you do not have feeler gauges on hand, Post-It notes from the small pads (not the big cubes as they're thicker) are approximately .004"/0,1mm to .005"/0,13mm thick. Grab a block of 25/50 Post-Its, measure the thickness of the block with calipers and divide it by the number of sheets. If this measurement is close or dead on, move on to the next string. You may should jot down the clearances as you move across the fretboard to see the nut slot heights in relation to the fretboard as you progress, especially if you have a locking nut. Adjusting A Standard Nut If you have determined that any of the slots in the nut are too low (usually due to wear and age) you may want to consider replacing the nut at this point. There is the option of packing the bottom of the nut slot using a mixture of CA (cyanoacrylate, crazy glue) and baking soda, or a little material sanded from elsewhere on the nut. Backfilling and cutting back nut slots in this manner requires a fair bit of experience and practice; the subject of a whole different tutorial. Nut replacement is generally more reliable, quicker and simpler....they're pretty cheap! If any of the slots are too high (or you just backfilled one) and excessive distance in the measurement between the bottom of the string and the first fret exists, the nut slot needs to be cut deeper. Special nut slotting files are readily available for this, however they can become expensive as specific file widths are required for each string gauge. Suppliers such as Stewart MacDonald sell nut files with dual cutting gauges, however welding nozzle/tip cleaners suffice for occasional repairs. It is even possible to mount a small piece of an old wound guitar string onto the side of a popsicle stick as a makeshift file of the correct string gauge. Firstly, remove the string from the nut slot. Usually it can be loosened and temporarily seated in an adjacent nut slot. Using a feeler gauge, find the existing falloff angle towards the headstock in the nut slot. File the slot a little at a time, keeping the file vertical and maintaining the existing falloff angle. Clean the slot from any debris, replace the string and bring it up to tension before repeating the 3rd fret/1st fret clearance test. Repeat the filing process until an adequate clearance is achieved. Replace the string and ensure that open notes ring clearly, otherwise the slot may have an inadequate falloff angle or the string is not seated firmly at the witness point. Bad nut slot falloff angle The string will intonate badly and open notes will likely buzz or choke. More desirable nut slot falloff angle The string witness point is sharply defined at the front of the nut. Adjusting A Locking Nut Filing down the metal in the slots of a locking nut is not an option. Instead, height adjustment shims are fitted under the nut itself to alter the height of the entire unit. Nut shims are available in different styles and thicknesses from the bridge/nut manufacturers or luthiery suppliers. Most are available in both full width and half width to allow raising one side of the bridge more than the other. If necessary you can combine several shims to achieve perfect clearance across the fretboard. Sacrificing a couple of feeler gauges is also a swift fix if shims are not easily available! Step 1: Introduction and headstock area Step 2: Trussrod and neck bow adjustment Step 3: Nut height check and adjustment Step 4: String height and bridge adjustment Step 5: Adjusting the intonation of a guitar Step 6: Adjusting pickup height
  6. Hi, My friend and I are currently building a Fender Jaguar in Sherwood green based on Johnny Marr's custom model. We are currently stuck on the wiring and how to basically put all the components together and which component's we would need. On the top plate we have a 3 way panel in which we intend to create: A killswitch (toggle on/off), a treble boost (roller wheel), and a bass removal/minimiser (roller wheel). As this is our first build we have vague to no idea on how to add these features. A list of components with how we'd put them in would be greatly appreciated, (also how to ground it, as we don't want to get that wrong at all). All help appreciated, Cheers
  7. Good afternoon musicians, luthiers, hobbyists and guitar fanatics (hopefully that should cover everyone who visits this site) This is my first visit to Project Guitar and I come to you with a problem. I am in the process building a monster, however unlike Victor Frankenstein's one, mine is definitely not alive.. Some time ago, when I first started playing electric guitar, my mother bought me a Karina Strat copy (chinese thing) that served me well until I upgraded to a Fender Strat. Naturally, I didnt want to dispose of my first electric guitar as it had sentimental value, however it had signficant short comings in comparison to the Fender. So, what did I do, I committed to turning this this guitar into a machine that you couldnt simply replace. Crazy some might say, I might tend to agree now. I threw away everything but the body, sanded the body back to the wood and stained it with a dark ebony look stain. I bought a Mexican fender locking nut neck, a floyd rose bridge, neck and bridge center tapped (4-conductor) Dimarzio humbuckers, a Skye Tweed Tone single coil for the centre position and had a custom made aluminium scratchplate made to accomodate the not-so-typical strat arrangement produced. I have also installed two switches such that you can choose between bumbucker or single coil arrangement for N and B positions, such that you can still achieve that single coil strat sound.. (image attached). I have wired it up using the typical strat wiring layout which I have found in books and on the net, however, when i plug it in to the amp I get horrendous feedback unless you touch the strings or metal work, only the center single coil will produce any sound, and the volume pot does not affect the sound. I have confirmed the right capacitance on the first tone pot, and bought a fairly well renowned cap for this purpose. Volume =500k, 1st tone =250k, 2nd = 500k. I have removed the humbucker switches from the circuit, so they arent the issue. I have installed bonding wires between the metal work and the 'earth' for the coils. Im running out of guesses as to how to get this going. I have been told that aluminium ( or metal scratch plates) are generally better as they work as a big shield for interference, however this seems to cause more noise than anything. I dont understand how I can be getting sound out og my amp without the volume control working. Im an electrical engineer, so have a basic understanding of RLC circuits etc, maybe im getting some crazy filtering going on, but given im using typical sizes for pots and caps, I dont think this should be an issue. Any assistance, ideas, or even inspirational messages would be of great benefit, as I am at the stage where this would make a great garden ornament, it simply doesn't function as a guitar. Best Regards Andrew
  8. Hello everybody, I just bought a 74 maple Jazz Bass neck which has been converted into a fretless by some ... intelligent ... person back in the day. There was also put a fair amount of laquer on the fretboard. I'd like to restore the neck to its former glory but I have no idea on how to get this laquer out of the fret slots. If there was no binding on the neck, I could easily re-saw them. Doas anyone have experience with that kind of problem? Any help would be greatly appreciated! Cheers, wolf
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