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Found 18 results

  1. A few weeks ago I started working on a pair of basses based around the old Gibson RD style from the late seventies/early eighties.... The basis of the Gibson RD was not too far removed from the classic Thunderbird design, however the through-neck of the Thunderbird and Firebird were eschewed in favour of the more familiar Gibson set-neck approach. The hardware was typical of Gibson basses at the time being a three-point bridge with its own little quirks. The two configurations ("Standard", "Artist") came passive with small soapbar humbuckers or active with a full Moog-designed filter circuit and larger low-output humbuckers respectively. Following the weirdness of the seventies, the originals were all-Maple contrary to the general Mahogany madness usually associated with the Gibson name. These are certainly not authenticity builds, however the design that I ended up with in CAD is not too far removed from the original. As usual, the essential underlying design was put through the "me filter", adding aspects I am more comfortable and familiar with such as volutes, scarf joints for stability, etc. The specification for each instrument is fairly different despite the same underlying design: RD Antrasiitti Body Two-piece Finnish Birch, 40mm thickness Gloss black paint (possibly Nitro) Rear electronics cavity Black pearloid pickguard Neck Finnish Birch neck, laminated from three vertical grained pieces Paperstone fingerboard Nickel-silver frets (2.8mm crown width, 1.4mm crown height) 35" scale 13° scarfed headstock with volute Two-way truss rod Neck thickness taper from 20mm at the 1st fret to 22mm before the heel transition kicks in Fibre-optic side fret markers inlaid in Sterling silver ferrules (white LED source) Electronics Guitar Logistics A8 blade humbuckers in chrome covers (all credit to RestorationAD for the work on these!) Custom differential buffer pre-amp Dual vol/tone RD Hiillos Body Two-piece Sapele, bookmatched curly Birch drop-top (40mm overall thickness) Cream/black 2-ply binding Gloss black back, tobacco burst top (Nitro) Rear electronics cavity 4-ply BWBW pickguard Neck Sapele neck, laminated from three vertical grained pieces Indian Rosewood fingerboard Nickel-silver frets (2.8mm crown width, 1.4mm crown height) 35" scale 13° scarfed headstock with volute Single-acting truss rod Neck thickness taper from 20mm at the 1st fret to 22mm before the heel transition kicks in Fibre-optic side fret markers inlaid in Sterling silver ferrules (flickering red/yellow LED source) Electronics NOS Gibson series 3 humbuckers (originals from a Standard) Custom differential buffer pre-amp Dual vol/tone My usual methods apply here - the instrument is drawn in a flattened top down state with no allowance for perspective distortion of viewing an angled neck or headstock. This is then translated to a side view where actual neck/headstock geometry are added in, before adjusting the top-down view to account for the distortions. This is done specifically for creating the body template and defining neck-body transitions only. The neck and headstock templates are "disembodied" and treated as seperate entities. I always draw only what is needed in CAD....this is functional rather than artistic!
  2. I want to build my first custom guitar, and I know what I want. I just don't know what my budget should be, and where I can find quality components. I want a Gibson explorer body, and I would like it to be sparkly purple with gold hardware. I want the purple sparkles to carry up the neck and cover the headstock. Other than that, I have no clue what pickups to look for and even what all I need. Thanks, Colin. also, don't want to blow the bank
  3. Hello everyone! My name is Chad and I'm currently putting together a Flying V kit, and I want to install the rubber knee pad off of the '58 V. I have the rubber pad, but now I need to know the best way to apply it. I'm finishing the guitar with a stain and Tru-Oil. What glue would be best to mount this with? Thanks everyone!!
  4. So i have a Les Paul and it has a buzzing issue. i checked and double checked all the wiring and everything is ok. I have been playing this guitar for a few years and this just happened. So on a whim I plugged in a regular guitar cable and checked to see if the tip and ring were touching with the bing option on my multi-meter. and sure enough there was! the buzz goes away when i am touching any metal parts but there is still continuity on the guitar cable. what is going on??? I spent at least 3 hours on it already. All of the sudden the buzzing is gone. Any ideas?
  5. Hello, my first post here. Thanks to anyone who's willing to take the time to help. I recently purchased a used mid 60's Gibson Explorer amp GA-15RVT. One of the previous owners for some reason removed the amp's reverb tank so my goal is to install a new reverb tank and get the reverb working again. I purchased a new reverb tank from Frank Fendly at www.studiosoundelectronics.com (he's a very nice guy BTW) so I have the correct reverb tank but I need help deciding how to solder this correctly. I have attached the schematic for the amp as well as interior pics. According to Frank at www.studiosoundelectronics.com, what i need to do is solder a cable from C11 and then plug that into the reverb tank with an RCA. The problem is that I don't know how to read schematics. Can anyone tell me where C11 is? Thanks, Daniel ga15rvt.pdf
  6. PhilippePaquet

    Guitar solo Shred

    Hello guys ! Here's a video I've done a couple of days ago Tell me what you think !
  7. Straight from the factory or off the shelf, an instrument rarely has its nut slots cut to ideal depths. Generally they are always cut a little high so that the instrument is buzz free out of the gate. For most people, slightly high nut slots go unnoticed and the tougher feel to the strings near the nut gets taken for granted. Before proceeding, ensure that your guitar is correctly strung up to pitch using the string gauges you normally use on that instrument and that your neck is reasonably straight with a little relief as per the previous step in this series. Check that your fretwork is not in need of immediate attention. A neck with incorrect relief or one with uneven high/low frets cannot be improved by adjusting the nut and may give false measurements. Firstly, you need to know what type of nut you have: Standard Nuts Standard "Gibson type" nut Standard "Fender type" nut The most common nuts found on non-tremolo or non-locking tremolo designs resemble the two above. A simple block of material with evenly-spaced slots. The material varies from plastics/composites, bakelite, bone, graphite and graphite substitutes, ivory, pearl, metals, wood or more exotic materials like carbon fibre or Borosilicate glass. Regardless of the material type, the function is the same. Each string has its own slot filed to the same width. The slot has a slight backward angle so that each string firmly contacts the very front of the slot. The depth of each slot is cut to create a string path over the first frets that is high enough that strings do not buzz over them when open notes are vibrating, but not so high that fretting lower notes becomes more difficult than the rest of the neck. "Fender type" nuts are installed into a slot milled in the fingerboard itself. "Gibson type" nuts butt up against the very end of the fingerboard, usually with a very small recess to prevent movement. These two styles are found on acoustics, basses, archtops, violins or in fact virtually any strung instrument vaguely related to a guitar. Locking Nuts Ibanez RG Locking Nut The downside to the previous type of nut is friction. In use, strings can bind up in the nut slots when using a tremolo or string bending. This leaves the string out of tune and can cause "pinging" sounds as the string pops out from being bound up. Worse yet, strings slowly grind their way down lower into the nut slots, especially wound strings in softer nut materials. Eventually open strings start buzzing over lower frets. Guitars with floating/locking tremolo systems such as a Floyd-Rose commonly use a metal locking nut mechanism which clamps strings in place once tuned. Locking nuts usually comprise small metal pad or cam clamps which hold two (sometimes three) strings at at time. The nut slots are precision milled into the body of the nut itself with perfect string witness points and falloff angles at the very front of the bridge itself. Other Nut Types Some tremolo systems (eg. a retrofit Kahler) work in conjunction with a standard style of nut, instead locking the strings a short distance beyond the nut. For the most part, these remove the issues of "binding and grinding". The standard nut is adjusted the same as it would be without the additional string locking unit. Zero frets are a hybrid between a "normal" nut and a fret. An additional fret is placed at the point where the nut would normally be. A guiding nut is placed slightly further back from the zero fret whose sole duty is to manage the string spacing than to set string height. The physical advantage of a zero fret is that they provide the same string height clearances as any other fretted note; automatic ultra-low action with no maintenance! Famous examples of instruments including zero frets are the Höfner "violin" bass and unusually, Brian May's inimitable "Red Special" with it's non-locking floating tremolo system. Other styles of nut exist also, such as the Fender LSR roller nut, adjustable brass nuts, etc. These require more specific considerations whereas this article is meant to cover the most common examples; an upcoming future update will cover the more exotic styles of nut.... Measurements One by one, fret the strings at the third fret or place a capo over all of the strings at this position. Each string should have an extremely small amount of clearance between the bottom of the string and the crown of the first fret. This can be carefully observed through lightly tapping the string at the first fret with a finger and/or measuring using engineer's feeler gauges. Ideally you should have at least .002"/0,05mm of clearance under the thinnest strings and .005"/0,13mm under the heavier wound strings. Generally speaking, as long as the strings are not contacting the first fret the clearance is fine. If you do not have feeler gauges on hand, Post-It notes from the small pads (not the big cubes as they're thicker) are approximately .004"/0,1mm to .005"/0,13mm thick. Grab a block of 25/50 Post-Its, measure the thickness of the block with calipers and divide it by the number of sheets. If this measurement is close or dead on, move on to the next string. You may should jot down the clearances as you move across the fretboard to see the nut slot heights in relation to the fretboard as you progress, especially if you have a locking nut. Adjusting A Standard Nut If you have determined that any of the slots in the nut are too low (usually due to wear and age) you may want to consider replacing the nut at this point. There is the option of packing the bottom of the nut slot using a mixture of CA (cyanoacrylate, crazy glue) and baking soda, or a little material sanded from elsewhere on the nut. Backfilling and cutting back nut slots in this manner requires a fair bit of experience and practice; the subject of a whole different tutorial. Nut replacement is generally more reliable, quicker and simpler....they're pretty cheap! If any of the slots are too high (or you just backfilled one) and excessive distance in the measurement between the bottom of the string and the first fret exists, the nut slot needs to be cut deeper. Special nut slotting files are readily available for this, however they can become expensive as specific file widths are required for each string gauge. Suppliers such as Stewart MacDonald sell nut files with dual cutting gauges, however welding nozzle/tip cleaners suffice for occasional repairs. It is even possible to mount a small piece of an old wound guitar string onto the side of a popsicle stick as a makeshift file of the correct string gauge. Firstly, remove the string from the nut slot. Usually it can be loosened and temporarily seated in an adjacent nut slot. Using a feeler gauge, find the existing falloff angle towards the headstock in the nut slot. File the slot a little at a time, keeping the file vertical and maintaining the existing falloff angle. Clean the slot from any debris, replace the string and bring it up to tension before repeating the 3rd fret/1st fret clearance test. Repeat the filing process until an adequate clearance is achieved. Replace the string and ensure that open notes ring clearly, otherwise the slot may have an inadequate falloff angle or the string is not seated firmly at the witness point. Bad nut slot falloff angle The string will intonate badly and open notes will likely buzz or choke. More desirable nut slot falloff angle The string witness point is sharply defined at the front of the nut. Adjusting A Locking Nut Filing down the metal in the slots of a locking nut is not an option. Instead, height adjustment shims are fitted under the nut itself to alter the height of the entire unit. Nut shims are available in different styles and thicknesses from the bridge/nut manufacturers or luthiery suppliers. Most are available in both full width and half width to allow raising one side of the bridge more than the other. If necessary you can combine several shims to achieve perfect clearance across the fretboard. Sacrificing a couple of feeler gauges is also a swift fix if shims are not easily available! Step 1: Introduction and headstock area Step 2: Trussrod and neck bow adjustment Step 3: Nut height check and adjustment Step 4: String height and bridge adjustment Step 5: Adjusting the intonation of a guitar Step 6: Adjusting pickup height
  8. Hi Ladies and Gents! Thanks for having me here. Been playing Guitar and Bass for 40 years now in many forms, Garage Band, L.A. scene, Casual and now a Rockin Church Praise team(5 guitars, Bass, keys, drums, Trumpet, Trombone and Sax)............. I am a die-hard Classic Rock fan but also like some mid/late 80's stuff. I find myself listening to early 70's folk type stuff...............Seals and Croft, Gerry Rafferty, Simon and Garfunkel, etc...................... Anyway, I have had a number of guitars in my life but i recently Built one...................... Sort of................... More of an Electric conversion to a semi-hollowbody, i love the 175's and 335's but never owned a real one. So, here is my personal version of a RETRO ES175: **Bought this old Tansen from a band buddy 10 years ago...................pretty basic guitar(I heard it was made by Jackson???) **The pictures explain best but I kept the beefy Jackson Humbucker, which has a splitter, and topped it off with a set of 11-50 Flatwound Jazz strings. It sounds very warm.................fat....................or crunchy if i choose. **I added an acoustic hole as well as the F holes. It actually functions and it sounds decent unplugged. I modified the original pickguard as you may see in the pics........... **I think it looks like an old Gretsch........................sorta Retro with the white and chrome accents. Remember.............I am not a Luthier, i found this to be a very rewarding challenge, i used some non-conventional ideas.
  9. Well hello there, my parents got me a kit guitar. I once told them I was watching and reading a lot about building a guitar. And now I want to take the oppertunity to learn about "building" a guitar, even thou all I have to do with the Thomann kit is finishing and putting all the parts together (which probably is way more than I currently expect it to be) As you probably read in the title it's a LP kit. http://www.thomann.de/de/harley_benton_electric_guitar_kit_lpstyle.htm this one to be more specific. I don't know what kind of finish I want it to have, but I thought of eigher a swirl in darker and lighter tones of blue, or using ink to darken the grain and trying a "poor-mans-sunburst". I'm not sure if the ink would do much, since its basswood and it usually doesnt have a lot of grain. I'll post a picture of the actual guitar as soon as I rip into the packaging and get it out of its cardbord prison. I hope you guys can help me if I have questions, and tell me if (or rather that) I have done stuff horribly wrong (and also hide my mistakes. Have a nice day, and most importand rock on Hendrik
  10. Hey, I wasn't sure where to put this, but I was sent this message and thought maybe I would share with everyone. Is anyone familiar with this auction house? Any information would help. "Did you know that one auction house was responsible for selling Jerry Garcia’s guitars for a million dollars a piece, Elvis Presely’s first guitar, Les Paul’s “Black Beauty”, Waylon Jennings' most iconic instruments and a wide array of the rarest Martins (including a 1930 OM-45 Deluxe to the Martin Museum) and other treasured acoustic instruments through the years? That auction house is Guernsey’s*, which is now planning a major guitar auction for the fall. If you have anything from a single treasured instrument to a wide range collection of cool electric or acoustic guitars, give Guernsey's a call. They would be excited to hear form you. *Call 212.794.2280 for more information or visit guernseys.com to read about Guernseys’ 40 year history including, among hundreds of other events, such sales as the ocean liner SS United States (the world's largest auction), the landmark Cold War auction of artwork from the Soviet Union, the sale of the complete archive of Rosa Parks, and the definitive auctions focusing on such iconic figures as John F. Kennedy, Franklin Roosevelt, Princess Diana, Elvis Presley, the Beatles, Mickey Mantle and Jazz greats John Coltrane and Charlie Parker."
  11. Fmiller

    Real or Fake Gibson

    My grandpa is moving and asked me to clean out his garage, I found a Gibson guitar my grandpa said he bought back in the 80's and forgot all about it and so he let me keep it. I started doing research and see things that make me think its fake but there are things that say it's real. The serial number is 7045 which is a true serial number for a 1961Gibson from the Kalamazoo Plant. There are parts of the guitar like the neck that look like they fakes but also has item's that look real. The fact my grandpa said he paid like $10 bucks for it back in the 80's at a garage sale is the biggest flag it's fake. Thanks for any tips or help.
  12. Alright so first off id like to start by saying I do not plan on doing this to deceive anybody, or sell it or any unethical stuff like that, however this is my first guitar. I've had it for about eight years, I,ve had others but always kept this one, I do not have the money to buy a les paul not even a studio but i figure if i spent a couple hundred bucks I could make it close. http://zurlocker.typepad.com/photos/uncategorized/2007/08/20/white_epiphone.jpg http://www.mylespaul.com/forums/members/ledlover01-albums-epiphone-les-paul-studio-white-picture15172-les-paul-2186.jpg This is what my guitar looks like (only with dr heavy strings and zakk wylde pickups) is it possible for me to take this neck http://www.ebay.com/itm/Guitar-Neck-fits-Gibson-Les-Paul-set-neck-and-LP-style-guitars-PROJECT-/130953075572 and get it on here? ive never done any work on guitars my dads always done it (im 18 now) id have to paint it and somehow learn to silkscreen the decals on it but i think it would be a really cool project can someone tell me if this is possible? or how i could start by going about this i havnt bought anything yet thanks guys
  13. Prostheta

    Gibson RD-style bass build

    From the album: Prostheta's Past builds

    Set-neck Birch bass in paint....
  14. I recently picked up an 84' designer series gibson flying V. My first V and yes I love it. Other than the selector wired backwards, the electronics seem to be in good shape but I decided to replace the bridge PU with a Dimarzio tone zone. Works like a charm and sounds amazing. The stock neck pickup howls feedback like crazy with my hi gain loud volumes and has too much low end. I'd like to save the stocker, I don't use the neck PU for anything other than a weaker vintage sound so the tone is ok just too bassy. I'm thinking of wax potting the bucker and maybe experimenting with a cap in series. I have the tools to do the wax potting so I will start with that but I haven't done anything with caps before. Any advice?
  15. Up until 1973 Gibson's bass bridges were fairly primitive and somewhat fault-prone but still relatively advanced in comparison to those in use by Fender. The introduction of their "three-point" bridge eliminated most of the existing problems of older bar or "two-point" bridges but introduced many of its own quirks. Still in use on modern Gibson and Epiphone basses, the three-point bass bridge is a proven design albeit mired in its traditional roots with much room for improvement. Up until the introduction of the SuperTone, upgrades for Gibson basses were near non-existent. The wide mounting point footprint, obligatory Gibson neck angle and modifications required to accept a new unit complicated the issue. More often than not any of these would leave the instrument devalued and impossible to restore to original spec. Hipshot certainly need little introduction to even the least experienced instrument modifier or builder. Their extensive history in producing premium hardware and drop-in retrofit upgrades makes them a regular byword and a go-to company. Hipshot are based in a substantial manufacturing facility located in Interlaken, NY which allows virtually all stages of production from material stock to boxed item to be carried out under one roof. As would be expected of dedicated retrofit items, Hipshot's SuperTone bridges match original mounting patterns for both two-point and three-point instruments. Simply removing the existing parts and dropping in the new unit is as complicated as fitment gets. By using the original mounting point locations and in-situ studs, owners of vintage instruments can confidently maintain 100% of the instrument's value by being able to return to stock invisibly. Common weak points with the original Gibson designs include two-point bridges bending forward under string pressure, saddles/intonation screws falling out three-point bridges, intonation difficulty and primitive adjustability. As is a common theme with Hipshot bridges, the SuperTone provides comprehensive independent adjustability in all dimensions with components sprung or tensioned against the bridge. SuperTone bridges are CNC milled from solid metal stock, in this case high grade Aluminium. This produces a tough, lightweight bridge with high tolerances and fantastic finishing in comparison to the rough variability of cast parts. Edges and corners are milled smooth with no seams, sharp or fragile areas. Saddle keyways share much of their design with the established Hipshot A-style bass bridges. Each keyway consists of a milled slot housing a large independently-adjustable saddle block which is itself milled from solid stock. Adjustment is possible in all three dimensions to dial in specific string geometries. The rear of the bridge is slotted allowing either bridge string capture or through-body stringing if the instrument has that option. Saddles possess grooved barrels instead of sharper notched string witness points virtually eliminating string breakage at this point. With the original bridges the saddles were fixed in height and radius or were compromised of a fixed "bar" witness point. This required that the entire unit be raised or lowered via the bridge posts. Primarily this restriction meant that instrument setups were coarse and a balance of compromises in setup geometry. Less noticeably the arrangement of some bridges - such as the three-point - also produced a weaker bridge-to-body coupling due to reliance on string tension holding the otherwise-loose bridge in place to the posts. The SuperTones lock down tight to the body of the instrument via two finish-matched mounting bolts producing the best coupling possible whilst the independent saddles a capacious level of intonation and geometry adjustment not previously feasible. Access to intonation adjustment screws is via the rear of the bridge. The screws are Phillips type in comparison to the slotted types of the original which prevents the problem of flat-bladed drivers slipping and scratching the instrument. The popular Hipshot saddle design is individually adjustable in height with ~1/3" (~8mm) of range via two hex set screws. The saddle barrels themselves can be unlocked via the third set screw with provision of side-to-side adjustment in a range of ~1/8" (~3mm) depending on string gauge. Whilst not designed for massively altering string spread, it does allow string spacing to be adjusted should the player want to take into account favourable string-to-string/equal centre spacings. As a retrofit item, the SuperTone admirably solves the shortcomings of the original bridges and introduces adjustment capabilities not previously possible. Although visually quite different to the originals, the appearance maintains a blend of both refreshing modernity and classic automotive age looks which are as pleasing on a new Thunderbird as on a 70s EB-0. All adjustment tools (other than a Phillips screwdriver for intonation) are provided along with two sets of mounting bolts to match both the Imperial and Metric threads. Setup is a breeze and free of frustration due to the excellent accessibility of all adjustment components even when strung up. From the standpoint of a custom luthier, the SuperTone bridges present interesting design options for different visual ideas to the norm. The intrinsic "Gibson nature" of the bridge requires a little forethought for correct instrument geometry however. A slight neck angle to maintain low body-to-neck join height or a small recessed footprint may be necessary. The substantial mass of the bridge lends a muscular design point which many bass designs would benefit from. As with most Hipshot's hardware it is difficult to find negative points to say about them. Their customer services guys know the value of listening to customers and apply this directly into the products without the huge inertia found with large corporations. Hipshot's email support before and after purchase is definitely key to their loyal customer base. With Hipshot carrying everything from design, manufacture and sales under one roof they definitely have the capacity to perfect their products as is demonstrated in items like the Supertone. If I were forced to hunt for negative points purely to provide balance for the huge number of positives, I would perhaps suggest adding a pad for the underside of the bridge to cushion the baseplate from pressing into soft or fragile finishes when locked down flat to the body. I can see this more being an issue for owners of vintage instruments. Most of the basses that these bridges are designed for command prices well into four figures therefore protecting the finish of investment quality instruments is important in maintaining the value of a bass that still works for a living. I also found that adding a pair of nylon washers underneath the heads of the mounting bolts was beneficial in helping keep them secure against loosening and preventing overtightening. The final twist of beyond "finger tight" snugs the heads secure. It should perhaps be noted that long-term use in exposure to direct sunlight may leave a light shadow underneath the bridge as the finish fades or reacts to UV. Overall I am surprised that new Gibson basses are not coming with this hardware as standard or at the very least as an option. If I came into possession of a stock Gibson Thunderbird (circa USD$1500?) with the original three-point bridge I wouldn't hesitate to upgrade it with this simple USD$120 bridge. Whilst it may sound and play well straight out of the box, without a doubt the addition of a Supertone puts it into a completely different league of instrument on both counts. In closing, the Supertone is a quality piece of hardware from a respected company that transforms Gibson basses into hugely adjustable, fuller-sounding and most importantly better-playing basses. For the builder these bridges offer a classy option for custom designs. I'm already itching to get one of the two-point Supertones into a future instrument. The three-point model installed here was acid fumed to add forty years of road hell; the modern styling certainly does not look out of place with a little antiqued mojo! SuperTone bridges are readily available direct from Hipshot at www.hipshotproducts.com or from many resellers worldwide. Bridges are available in Chrome or Black finishes with the three-point bridge also available with genuine Gold plating. Want a mix of parts such as a black base with gold saddles? Have a quick chat with the guys - Hipshot are some of the nicest in the business and love custom ideas. Tell 'em ProjectGuitar.com sent you :-)
  16. This is a project which will have a reasonably lengthy build-up time, so this thread exists purely to gather information, consolidate the design and work methodologies. A little background. I have never built an acoustic or archtop previously to this, so much of this particular thread will consist of my research and references to information online or from books, etc. The Gibson EB-750 and its sister the EB-650 were extremely rare (less than 100) basses built upon the designs of the Gibson ES range. The EB-750 was (as far as I am aware) the same underlying design as ES-175 but with a bass neck and a bridge placed further towards the rear of the instrument. My initial proposal is to build two basses, one with the same archtop design as the ES-175 with the longtitudinal braces and another with the more ES-335 style of build having a large solid central block between the arched back and top. I predict that these builds will be more likely to happen towards the end of Spring or worst case towards Autumn 2013. In the meantime I will be examining and refining more of the project specifics including things like moulds, methods of making the sides (laminating/bending) and the all-important back and top carving. Hopefully throughout the process we can document and critique processes fully for the purposes of tutorials, etc. Is anybody familiar with the EB-750 bass or in fact the ES-175? There is plenty of room for discussion on this one.... Cheers.
  17. Prostheta

    Thunderbird bass

    From the album: Prostheta's Past builds

  18. Prostheta

    Thunderbird bass

    From the album: Prostheta's Past builds

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