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Found 8 results

  1. tl;dr version; Just bought this guitar, humming issues, no experience in electronics, please help! Hello everyone...it´s been quite a long time since I last visited. I hope you guys are doing well. I just got myself a beautiful, previously owned Godin A6 Ultra, just got it today in the mail! As you can see, it was modded. I bought it on a site which I believe is owned by ebay. I´ve purchased many things there, and never had an issue. Certainly, I hope that is the case this time as well, but I would appreciate guidance. I have zero experience with electronics. Ok, so the guitar was modded with a volume and tone pots, along with an output jack. The guitar has the original circuitry, which is a side output for the humbucker, and a jack for acoustic or mix. I asked the seller, who has high reputation at the site, and he said he had bought the guitar from a collector in Texas. He was the original owner and had the mods made. Later, he had it put back to stock...except for the electronics on the top. He didn´t ask on what the mods where or what the configuration was. The guitar arrived today at my dad´s house, so I went there after work to pick it up. When I got home, I immediately set up my PC (I play through amp sims) and was surprised by some hum and gainy tones, along with somewhat uneven volume. I tried both jacks just to see if I could assess both tones, but the acoustic preamp had no output. Then it hit me that it works of a 9 volt battery. I took it out, but I don´t have means to check whether it is dead. No biggie, I´ll get one tomorrow. So, I focused on the humbucker sounds. I didn´t open the guitar, but I read on it before buying, and remembered somebody mentioning the humbucker is wired to the preamp as well. I guess this is necessary to have either acoustic or electric, or the mix, but I don´t know for sure. I tried a few presets and the hum worsened with some, lessened with others along with some drop in volume. I fiddled with the noise gate in the VST, but that didn´t help much. When I actually tried a preset with some gain and volume, the interface input spiked, and the hum turned into screeching. I unplugged the guitar and the interface, then restarted the pc. After rebooting, I tried the same, with the same results. I was ready to blame the interface, but first I picked up another guitar with humbucking pickups...dead quiet. Well, some noise, but nowhere near what I experienced with the other guitars. I want to try the preamp tomorrow, but my hunch is that the issue is something else. My guess is that the humbucker should work even if the preamp it´s connected to has no power...but I´m not sure on that. I have no experience with microphonic or ungrounded pickups, and that might not even be the issue. I´m concerned because there are no techs I know of here where I live. Maybe it is simpler than what I fear, or it might be enough to place a complaint at the site. I kind of hope for an "easy" fix and leave it alone. I would like to keep the guitar. In fact, I have a very nice pickup I would like to swap with the one it has right now, but I won´t if the design is not meant to work with another one. When trying it out acoustically, I tried the pots on the top, and they are perfectly placed and seem good quality. If possible, I would like to have the magnetic pickup swapped for the one I already have, maybe wire the guitar circuits independent of each other... Anyway, sorry for the humungous post...I tend to do that,
  2. Custom pickup winding

    Hi all, I've recently started guitar building and I've begun with a starter project: an electric ukulele (les paul type). It's going well for now and I will post my build log soon, but I've hit a wall regarding the electronics . Since electric ukuleles are not mainstream, I couldn't find any pre-made pickups (aside from acoustic pickups) and from what I've seen by googling many tend to use regular 6 strings pickups. But personally I find it too large and it takes-up too many space on the body. So I've decided to build my own pickup (I'm aware it may be a little too complex for a beginner...) I plan (in fact I've started) to mod an humbucker pickup kit by cutting down each piece and removing a section to bring it to 4 strings. Now my question is about the winding of this thing, From what I've gathered, the "standard" winding is about 7000 turns. But I'm wondering how it scales to a 4 strings pickup. From my little knowledge of electronics, I understand that the resistance of the pickup is related to the total length of the wire. So since the bobbin will be smaller, does it means that I need to do more turns (to get about the same length) or because it is a smaller pickup maybe I don't need that much resistance. Any help an general advice on pickup winding would be appreciated! (As a bonus I've attached a picture to show my progress so far)
  3. So I have an Ibanez RG320 that I am fixing up. I have the Dimarzio's that were used in the Charvel San Dimas Re-Issue Circa 1995. They are labeled J152 and J158. Everything I read online says these Ibanez RG320's should have a 5 way switch however it looks as though I have a 3 way. There are only 3 positions that it will go to and there are 7 poles on it(7 places to attach wires). This is my first time to wire up a guitar and it looks as though I can keep most of the wiring that the previous person had done, however I am unsure exactly how to wire to the switch since i cant find a diagram online that looks exactly like mine. I have attached the red wires coming from the dimarzios to the switch where I think they should go and have the Black and White wires together and taped up. but not exactly sure where to run my grounds, and what to do with the greens. Of course I have 1 tone pot and 1 volume pot as well. I just don't want to do it completely wrong and all I can find online are switches that look to have 6 poles or 8 poles all in a straight line. Its very frustrating and I am about to go full r***rd and thrash everything in my apt. Please help.
  4. Commercially-made routing templates for humbuckers are easy to find from virtually all good luthiery supply outlets these days. They're a fantastic turnkey solution for carrying out this common task. Beyond the "standard" sizes, templates for larger pickups are thin on the ground meaning that we end up making them ourselves. Standard or not, the process of making a template for any humbucker-style pickup is the same and it's not a huge leap to tweak the dimension to fit a variety of pickup sizes such as mini humbuckers, etc. Pickups fitted into pickguards or under a pickup ring don't need tailored routs; we don't see them on the finished instrument. This isn't to say that we can butcher them in, just that we only need to concentrate on their functionality and fitness for purpose over their cosmetic value. A more complex tutorial for pickup routs tailor-made to the exact dimensions and corner radii for a "showy" exposed rout and direct mounting will come later in this series. That is not to say these routs can't be executed with precision and beauty of course, but that's up to you! ----==---- Overview and Objectives This tutorial will take you through the creation of an easy but effective pickup routing template. Although the underlying method of constructing the template has been in use for decades, I expanded on it for use with a variety of modern pickup sizes and to incorporate the recessing to make it a single job rather than two. The system described is universal in that it will create routs to accept any "body with legs" style pickup with simple corner radiusing and provision for recesses for the legs/screws. Since the outline of the rout will be hidden under the pickup ring, it just needs to be functional and do the job its intended for. First we'll look at how to make the template using a standard humbucker, and finally look at how to take measurements from any pickup/pickup ring and translate them through to your own custom template system. To keep the work simple and straightforward, we'll only be using a standard 1/2" diameter bearing-guided template cutter (12mm if you're Metric!). The template uses basic materials and techniques. The ideas and approaches discussed are designed to help you take onboard transferable skills that assist you in creating custom templates for anything, even beyond pickups. Definitely a good exercise towards becoming a next level template-making ninja! A cavity straight off the router with light sanding to remove the fuzzies - perfect ----==---- What We Need Pencil Ruler/Calipers Wood glue A router and a bearing-guided template cutter (1/2" diameter, 1/2"-3/4" length or shorter) Sheet stock suitable for templating (plywood, MDF, etc) cut into strips Double-sided tape Drill bits (optional) Wooden dowels (optional) Nothing that shouldn't already be on hand in your workshop! ----==---- How The Template Works The template consists of two identical halves which can either be glued together to make a permanent single-size template or pinned together to create a variety of different widths. Each half is designed to rout both the main cavity and with the inclusion of a specifically-sized insert, the deeper leg recesses also. Mockup showing the main template assembled The template exploded, showing both halves and the dowel locating system Template with auxiliary insert for leg recessing ----==---- A Quick Look At Humbucker Routs There's no real secret or magic going on behind the pickup ring. Enough wood needs to be missing in the middle that the pickup drops right in and either side so that the pickup height adjustment screws fit. Wood needs to be left at each corner for the pickup ring mounting screws. We could simply rout the entire thing to one depth, however that's just crude and we hold ourselves to a higher standard, right? We shouldn't need to remove more wood than we have to, and this template system makes it simple so there's no reason to go medieval. The pickup cavity (dark red) is hidden by the pickup ring, but leaves plenty of wood to fix the ring to the body ----==---- Template Construction The template system we'll be making is for a standard humbucker, made using simple stacked strips of wood or sheet stock. The only tool/skill we need is to be able to rip stock into strips of specific widths and cut the ends a neat 90° (another use for a fret slotting mitre box!). How you choose to make the strips of material is up to yourself; many options are available from cutting them on a table saw to sizing them using a thickness planer/sander or even using a router thicknessing jig! The only requirement is that the cut edges are clean and glue-able, and that you can manage making them to a reasonable level of precision. The template in this tutorial was made from 15mm thick Birch plywood, ripped into long 40mm, 20mm and 10mm strips on a table saw. These were them cut down to specific smaller lengths using a fret slotting mitre box. We'll discuss how those widths were arrived at later, and it'll be more meaningful if we look at the process first.... The stock we need is: 40mm (1,58") 2x 200mm or longer (7,87") 20mm (0,79") 2x 56,5mm (2,22") 1x 64,5mm (2,54") 10mm (0,39") 4x 64,0mm (2,52") 2x 72,0mm (2,84") In actuality, the only parts which need to be of a very very specific lengths are the three components for the auxiliary recessing template (10 x 64,5mm and 20 x 72mm) since the outline of the template isn't that important; only the internal components and edges where the router bearing will be running. Template stock cutdowns The strips were cut into the various calculated lengths and cleaned up. Laying them out over a printed paper template helps check for fit and alignment, plus we know we have everything and where it is! Download Printable Paper Template here! standard humbucker template layout.pdf Laying out using a printed drawing The auxiliary template for the pickup tab recesses is the part that the rest of the template should be physically built around, so assemble and glue this up first. The paper printout helps check that everything is sized and aligned, however double-checking the ends for squareness with scrap or a ruler ensures we're not building in any inaccuracies. Apply glue to the inner part's mating surfaces and adjust/assemble everything to that by hand. Put the assembly onto a flat surface, and push everything into correct alignment and let it sit for a minute or two so the glue starts to set up. Next, apply light clamping pressure whilst it dries. The small amount of setting up time helps stop parts shifting around under clamping pressure. You did check for alignment, right? Once this is dry, clean up the part from any squeezeout. A few tiny beads as pictured is about perfect for this work. Next, snug up the main parts of the template around the auxiliary template. Repeat the same process of gluing up all four parts of each template half, using the auxiliary template for reference to avoid any gaps or misalignments. Glueup can be done one part at a time or all at once. Masking tape applied to the top/bottom helps keep the parts from sliding around! Again, check check and check again at every stage. Looking good! Once we have the two outer halves assembled and cleaned up, we can either glue them both together to form a permanent one-size template or we can add a method of fitting the halves together temporarily. The simplest method is using simple wooden dowels which have enough retention strength to hold the template together, but can easily be released to alter the jig's size by placing them in holes corresponding to different set sizes. Clamping the workpiece down and drilling a hole through from one to another gives us an exact method of setting the jig up. One clamp holds the first half down, whilst the second holds both halves together. Drilling for the 8mm locating dowel - yes, I only have three fingers because I'm a Parktown Prawn.... After the first hole is drilled, a dowel is tapped in to secure both halves. The assembly is then flipped with the dowel in place, and a second hole/dowel added to the other side. Note that I added two alignment arrows indicating the size this "setting" is designed for. This was purely to counter my own future stupidity. Your own mileage may vary. Tapping in the locating dowel The finished adjustable template system should look something like this when complete. The dowels are removable for when different size settings need adding in. All that's left is to test fit a humbucker and pickup ring! The pickup has a little room to move in the cavity, allowing for angled pickup rings, finish, etc. The pickup ring completely covers the gap and the mounting screwholes have plenty of wood under them ----==---- The Template System In Use The main template can either be mounted using double-stick tape (about an inch square in each corner) or clamped either side. Positioning holes drilled through from the rear help position the template on the centre and cross lines. If the template is adjustable, each position will need its own specific centreline positioning hole....remember to mark them up meaningfully! The first step is to rout the leg/tab recesses to depth either side by fitting the auxiliary template. It should be snug in the centre; if not, use a piece of double-stick tape underneath or a piece of masking tape over the top to secure it. Bridge position humbucker rout on my Lancaster superstrat design The cutter used has a length of 15mm (around 5/8") which is perfect for this size template. Anything longer than the template is thick, and you soon find that the initial cut is going to be tough and unpredictable. You don't want the cutter trying to jump around before the bearing is even in the template, as that results in a dead template..... A 1/2" length 1/2" long cutter is perfect for this work. Mine is 12mm diameter, however that only means that the corner radii will be slightly tighter. Absolutely no problem since this is a hidden rout. After the initial cut, the radiused corners left by the cutter become apparent. After the recess has been taken to the full depth, the auxiliary template can be removed and flipped to do the other side. Perfect. That was about a minute's worth of work! We can now remove the auxiliary template and start work on routing the main cavity. Two passes and the target depth was achieved. Time to remove the template.... Aside from a little scorching and minor fuzzies, the rout is more or less good to go with no more work other than the cable drilling. A test fit is a good idea. Perfect. The actual pickup ring will be taller than this one so we have more than enough breathing room with the depths selected. ----==---- Calculating Your Own Dimensions Taking the basic idea of how this system works, we can extend it out to any width humbucker or even pickups of completely different sizes. ....For A 7-String Pickup For an adjustable style template, we don't even need to make a new auxiliary insert for wider pickups such as a 7-string. We simply make an appropriately-sized shim to open out the template a bit more. Typically 7-string rings tend to be 10mm wider than their 6-string equivalents - give or take 0,5mm - which means we only need to make a 10mm wide shim. Cutting a shim from a stick of 10mm template stock in a fret slotting mitre box.... It's worth checking your pickup ring for its total width; this setup with a 10mm shim would expand the internal pickup cavity from 72mm to 82mm and the recesses from 87mm to 97mm. The 7-string pickup ring I have on hand is 99mm wide, so it would work with that one but you should confirm from your own measurements before committing to the wood! ....For The Entire Template Fundamentally, the sizes of the routs and your template should be designed from the pickup ring backwards. This is the only part that physically mounts to the body and covers the rout itself, so as long as the ring can be mounted, hides the rout and the pickup fits then it does the job. In theory the rout could be as large as you want it to be but ideally we should work the maximum sizes down to something more suited to the pickup itself. Removing only as much wood as is needed instead of as much as we can. We'd prefer to keep as much wood as possible, right? So let's look at a typical pickup ring and we'll see how I arrived at the dimensions of the basic template: Yep. Typical humbucker ring dimensions. Working backwards from this, we have about this much area that we can rout before we run into issues with the pickup mounting ring screws: Absolute maximum cavity area It's a pretty big chunk of wood to be dialling out of your guitar, especially when you compare it to a typical pickup: More than enough room to swing a humbucker If you want to alter your own template sizes to make a cavity that big, that's fine, overkill or not. The recesses either side should be narrow enough that the wood where the pickup ring mounting screws sit have enough strength left. The pickup ring measures 36,8mm/1,45" screw to screw. Bringing in the recesses at least 5mm from the centre of each screw location point is what I'd call a good minimum. This would make the recesses 26,8mm wide. For simplicity's sake, you'd round that down to 1" or 25mm. Simpler sizes makes cutting stock easier to manage. The same applies to the screws either side; their spacing is 81mm/3,19" giving us a reasonable maximum of 71mm/2,8"....calling that 70mm or 2-3/4" makes sense. The width of the pickup ring at 44,5mm rounds down nicely to 40mm or 1-5/8". Humbuckers are usually anything from 36-38mm in width. Unless you're working with a pickup with HUGE tabs (I've see some), the side recesses really don't have to be an inch wide. I mean, you could still stick with this value if you want, but most tabs are half inch at the most. 20mm allows for the corner radius of the cutter and means that the outer parts can be 10mm wide. Very very nice easy numbers! A recess width of 15mm centred on the main cavity's sides satisfies my internal need for symmetry, and brings the total width of the cavity up to 72 + 7,5 + 7,5 = 87mm. Fine for an 88,7mm wide ring. Drawing this out - a 72mm x 40mm central cavity and two 20mm x 15mm recesses (with 1/4" radii from the cutter) works out neatly. A wider/longer main body rout allows pickups with sharper corners to fit There's no substitute for taking a ruler and a pair of calipers to your pickup ring and pickup, then drawing it out after calculating your values in the same way. ....And Applying Them Let's use this to develop a template for a hypothetical mini humbucker: Now this should be relatively straightforward, however the radius of our cutters might mean the recesses have to be a little wider to allow for the tab corners. Let's have a look at the ring.... The pickup ring mounting screw locations are spaced 85mm x 25mm, so we can safely make the recesses 15mm wide to allow 5mm either side of the screws. Similarly, the maximum width of the main cavity can be 75mm. We'll be generous with the pickup cavity width, and let's call that a round 30mm. We'll call the tab recesses 15mm x 15mm. Let's see how those figures stacks up. Okay, that would definitely work as-is. Like the example with the humbucker, it might be able to be made smaller. Let's add in the cutter radius and see what happens.... Okay. The smaller size of this mini humbucker means that we need to cut a bit oversize because of the cutter's radius, otherwise things like the pickup corners and the tabs would clash with the rout. You could even make the case that the tab recesses could be drilled with a Forstner bit instead of being routed....! So this is how we could plan this out as a template set; pretty simple once you think it through! ----==---- Conclusion Making templates is about working ideas and methods into your personal trick bag. An extensible template that can be used in more than one situation is a powerful and productive thing to invent, otherwise we'd be making a new template for every last thing every single time. Routs that end up being hidden give us a bit more flexibility to bend dimensions in our favour to make the template simpler, or to streamline the rout itself. A system like this turns a humbucker rout into a three-minute job, sweat-free, making it worth its weight in gold to the busy luthier. ----==---- www.patreon.com/ProjectGuitar If you enjoyed and benefited from this article. become a Patron of ProjectGuitar.com and help us actively continue bring you even more articles, tutorials and product reviews like this, week-in week-out. We appreciate your feedback in the comments section, and we hope you enjoyed this tutorial as much as we did compiling it! This tutorial was made possible by ProjectGuitar.com's Patrons sirspens a2k Chris G KnightroExpress Stavromulabeta Andyjr1515 sdshirtman djobson101 ScottR Buter curtisa Prostheta 10pizza verhoevenc VanKirk rhoads56 Chip
  5. Pickup ID Help

    Hello, I received these pickups from a friend with absolutely no information on them. I was thinking of trying them out in a project guitar but since I do not know the manufacturer (I'm assuming they must be knock offs) I'm not quite sure how to go about wiring them up since none of the wires seem to fit any standard wiring color. the wires coming out of the humbuckers are blue, white, yellow, red and bare. the only markings on the bottom side are F and R, which I assume is for Front (neck) and rear (bridge). I'm putting them into a strat with a way selector switch. any info would be greatly appreciated. Thanks, jake
  6. How To Identify A Humbucker's Wiring Scheme

    The information in Bill's original article is still 100% correct; using his method of drawing out your pickup for visual reference in combination with this video you should have zero problems figuring out those mystery buckers!
  7. I'm having some trouble selecting pickups for a project I'm doing. I'm constructing a Mahogany Warrior body that I'd like to use with a Jackson DK2M neck. I'd like to use an aggressive set of HBs for this project considering the body shape. I'm just not sure what I should use. I'm considering HBs that are balanced in the tonal range like Seymour Duncans "Black Winter" (high: 6/10 mid: 6/10 low: 6/10). I'm not sure, technically, if this is a good choice considering the body/neck materials. Anyone have a recommendation?
  8. Hello, to all of you, electronic gurus ! I'm currently working on a "swiss army knife" custom guitar, but I want everything planned out, before actually buying anything critical. (features: tremolo, on-board FFactory clone, coil split, MAYBE a sustainer...) So. I've been hearing that market-available sustainers don't work with a neck pickup, because of interferences. But, I want a sustainer (thanks to the amazing "sustainer ideas", i could do the sustainer system myself, possibly modifying it to fit my demands), and I want my two sh2 and sh4 seymour duncan pickups BUT, I've come across this, during my journey on the internet (it fits !!) Fernandes Sustainer Website's FAQ says the sustainer needs to be at least 2cm away from any selected pickup. So, as I'm ordering a custom body at Warmoth, do you think the "24-frets humbucker relocation" option could solve the interferences problem ? (Would it make possible for me to use the sustainer with the neck pickup selected ?) If not, I could still chose to "relocate it", in order to have room for a real neck pickup, and a sustainer (at least) But, would it alter the sound of my neck pickup, "in a dramatical way" ? ( i'm sure it does change the sound, but, how much does it change ?) Thanks in advance, ladies and gentlemen ! And please let me apologize for my approximate english !
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