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opinions on beginner tools


Nalo1022
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Hi I've been lurking around this website for about a year now and i will soon be moving into a hsoue that will allow me to have an actual worshop and i was wondering wat ppl think of these tools for someone who is jsut starting out with guitar making

band saw http://www.homedepot.com/prel80/HDUS/EN_US...ID=9876&pos=p06

router http://www.homedepot.com/prel80/HDUS/EN_US...ID=9876&pos=p06

drill press http://www.homedepot.com/prel80/HDUS/EN_US...ID=9876&pos=p06

Edited by Nalo1022
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lol i didnt i was just rushing out the door wen i posted so ti was annoying lol

Ryobi 9in bandsaw $87

Powerful 2/5 Amp induction motor. Blade tracking sight window. RapidSet blade tensioning system. Rack and pinion blade guide adjustment. Independent upper and lower TrackLock blade guides. Table tilts from 0-45degrees. Flexible work light. Adjustable rip fence. Sliding miter gauge. Includes 9" Bandsaw with 1/4"X6T Blade, work light, miter gauge, and rip fence.

Ryobi 10inch Benchtop Drillpress $99

Bores holes to the center of a 10 in. W stock. 1/2 in. chuck. 5 speeds (540-3600 rpm.) for use with a variety of drill bits & materials. Adjustable depth lock with 2 - 3/8 in. stroke allows for precise repetitive cuts. Accepts mortise attachments. 1/4 hp induction motor for heavy duty operation.

Ryobi 3 Base Router Kit $149

This 2 hp. routers is 3 tools in one. Kit includes Plunge base, "D" handle base, and fixed base. It has a rubber adjustment collar. Electronic variable speed with soft start. The base is die cast aluminum. Model number RE1803BK

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Here we go again with the 9in bandsaw!!!!!!!!!......and a Ryobi to boot!!!!!!!

It is undersized.....underpowered......and generally a piece of junk.

Rigid makes a decent 14in bandsaw for @$365.....You can find it at Home Depot.

Bust on me if you want, but I know tools and machinery....also their limitations. Every tool is designed for an intended purpose.......I use my 9in bandsaw for cutting out jewelry pieces......A 9in bandsaw was never intended to cut through 2in of mahogany or other hardwood. I find it difficult to cut out some guitar bodies on a 14in bandsaw because of the table size.......I also have a 36in bandsaw, which is my workhorse....It does all my resawing.....I can resaw 20in purpleheart.....I'll bet you can't resaw 3in of p-heart on a 9in.

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I actually used to use a CRAPPY little 1/5HP Companion 7 3/4" bandsaw. I was able to cut out Alder/Mahogany bodies, Mahogany neck blanks for 'ukuleles, Maple neck blanks for guitars. I've re-sawed 4 3/4" thick Koa for 'ukulele body halves, and I even re-sawed 4" thick Ebony, but the Ebony put alot of stress on the motor. Most of the time I used a 1/4"x4TPI blade, as I recall, so I could get fast cuts. Blade tracking wasn't that good though.

I now have a 14" bandsaw. It's awesome. I even made a riser for it - get's me 9 1/4" under the guard with a standard 98"x3/4"x3TPI. I resawed some flamed and quilted tops.

If you can afford a 14", get that. I speak of experience having used a benchtop bandsaw and upgrading to a 14" only this February, as well as having used a benchtop 8" drillpress to make all my instruments.

BTW, westhemann uses a 9" bandsaw, maybe ask him how well it's working out.

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I've re-sawed 4 3/4" thick Koa for 'ukulele body halves, and I even re-sawed 4" thick Ebony, but the Ebony put alot of stress on the motor. Most of the time I used a 1/4"x4TPI blade, as I recall, so I could get fast cuts. Blade tracking wasn't that good though.

....that is what I'm talking about.....Koa and ebony are on 2 "different animals", so to speak.....Extra stress means shorter motor life...... due to the difficulties in cutting through certain woods, you can destroy your guide bearings....THEY COST AS MUCH TO REPLACE AS THE ENTIRE SAW!

I was impressed with Rigid, as less expensive line of machines....Their drill press looked to be substantial and it seemed as if their jointers would be a good machine to own for small shop applications.

" Cheaper the better" is not necessarily the way to go....you'll end up buying your tools twice if you use them often.

I wouldn't buy a Ryobi router either....nor a Craftman for that matter.....Porter-Cable, Bosch and a few others are far beyond the "consumer grade" stuff in regards to quality. For just a few $$$$s more, you can purchase so much more quality.

There is a reason some tools are cheaper than others.....usually cheaper bearings or cheaper motors.

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I'd try to get used stuff. If you know what to look for, your money goes farther. Buying new does not get rid of the headaches that are involved with tracking down good used stuff. A lot of new stuff is made to look like it is capable of more than it really is. It's often still like dealing with a used car salesman, even if the stuff being offered is new.

So many people have workshops full of these tools, and there usually comes a time when it all has to be sold off. So consider that with your limited budget.

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If you are patient, a good 14in bandsaw can be found at a garage sale for next to nothing......As with many used machines, check it over thoroughly.....Certain parts that need to be replaced, will turn a great deal on a used machine into a headache! Also check out auctions and estate sales.

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Have a look at Grizzly Tools Drill Presses and Bandsaws. The Larger the drill press you get, the happier you will be later. I bought one of the 8" Delta drill presses at HD and while it is a great tool and value, I couldn't drill bridge holes that were 6" across the body since the throat was 4". Same with the bandsaw, the wider the cutting distance, the better.

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Given your fixed budget, I'd consider picking up some tools from pawnshops. There are several close to my house and I hit them biweekly to check for deals. For $100.00 you could get a bigger and better bandsaw. I saw a decent looking makita a few weeks ago. The asking price was $120.00. When buying from pawnshops, walk in with an educated idea of price and quality. Make sure to ask if the prices are negotiable (they always are) and haggle them down to atleast 50% of what they're asking. :D

MLAR, Cor

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If ou are going to be using a drum sander in the pillar drill, then it may be worth looking to upgrade that a bit. I'm using my dads cheap ass pillar drill (£30 brand new from homebase) and it's wicked for a £30 drill but that's about as far as it goes. Like Tdog was saying about bearings, they're a bit dodgy and I wouldn't like applying sideways force on them.

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I'm sort of kicking myself right now. I bought a 16 speed drill press off a buddy for $100 and resold it for $150. But this thing was massive and ancient, must've weighed about 200 lbs. But I got no place to put such machinery. I could have left it in the shed but would have to lug it out every time I wanted to use it, or left it outside on the bench all covered up, nah. I can think of several instances where it would have been handy.

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