Jump to content

can I split a 2-conductor wire humbucker?


albertop
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hello, I want to install a Golden Age humbucker in my latest guitar, it will only have 1 humbucker so I will like to put a mini toggle switch to split the humbucker so it´ll sound like a single coil also (I don´t know what´s the right name to this, is it "coil tap"?). Well, the Golden Age humbucker only have 2 wires + ground, so my question is: can I do it with this humbucker? or I will have to look for a 4-wire humbucker? thanks a lot.

Alberto

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hello, I want to install a Golden Age humbucker in my latest guitar, it will only have 1 humbucker so I will like to put a mini toggle switch to split the humbucker so it´ll sound like a single coil also (I don´t know what´s the right name to this, is it "coil tap"?). Well, the Golden Age humbucker only have 2 wires + ground, so my question is: can I do it with this humbucker? or I will have to look for a 4-wire humbucker? thanks a lot.

Alberto

If you have the know-how and are willing to modify your pickup, it can be done.

Firstly, know that a humbucker is simply two single-coils wired up in series, with one "flipped" in wiring sequence from the other. This is what cancels the hum.

So, we have 2 single coils. Each single coil has two wires: A start, and a finish. In standard humbucker configuration, the two finish wires are connected, and the two starts serve as the two main wires leading from the pickup. The ground is typically attached to the metal base upon which the pickup is mounted.

The only difference between a 2-conductor and a 4-conductor pickup is two finish leads. In a two, they're connected, and concealed within the humbucker. In a four, the two finish wires exit the pickup, and go to the switching/control area, as they're needed.

To convert a 2-conductor to a 4, disassemble the pickup, cut the wire connecting the two coils, then attach longer wires onto each. Re-assemble the whole works, so that you now have 4 wires, plus the fifth ground. Done.

From there, you have the option of doing all kinds of fun switching configurations...enjoy!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

...If you have the know-how and are willing to modify your pickup, it can be done...

Of course, if you had the know-how, you wouldn't have had to ask the question :D

For the record, while everything Fan O' Zakk says is correct, unless you can afford to replace the pickup, taking it apart and rewiring it is not a very good idea. If you can afford another pickup, buying a 4 conductor pickup is a lot easier than modding an existing design, and you know the results ahead of time.

If you're into rewinding your own pickups and want to learn about how they're made, and you're willing to risk it, then take it apart with my blessings, but don't get the idea that it's a simple process. Chances are very good that you will end up with a paperweight.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I´ve just check the StewMac free info page and they says this: "Stewart-MacDonald Golden Age humbucking pickups allow for standard humbucking operation and a single-coil or coil-cut output". So I guess I can use this pickup after all. Thanks a lot guys, sorry for not having check the page early.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In case you guys didn't notice, albertop said that his pickup has 2 wires and a ground (or shield). In some pickups, this means that the shield is the pickup's common, one of the wires is the coil split, and the other wire is the 2 coils in series relative to the common (for humbucking). To know for sure, you need an ohmmeter to measure between the shield and each wire. The resistance between the coil tap and the shield should be around half of the resistance measured between the other wire and the shield.

Edited by Saber
Link to comment
Share on other sites

In case you guys didn't notice, albertop said that his pickup has 2 wires and a ground (or shield). In some pickups, this means that the shield is the pickup's common, one of the wires is the coil split, and the other wire is the 2 coils in series relative to the common (for humbucking). To know for sure, you need an ohmmeter to measure between the shield and each wire. The resistance between the coil tap and the shield should be around half of the resistance measured between the other wire and the shield.

exactly my point. as that is the way carvin pickups that i have had come

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...