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Filling In The Fabrication Holes


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There are four small holes in the bolt-on neck that I bought. I was told that they were from the manufacturing process, and won't affect the strength of the neck.

But I would like to fill them in.

I was thinking about using some of my super-strong epoxy (so it will strenthen the wood grain that area) and either basswood dowels or threaded brass "pins" (that are used for gunstock repair). Since I have all of the above laying around, I won't have to spend money to use these materials.

Given these circumstances, what would work best?

Or should I go buy something else?

D~s

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Are these holes in the heel of the neck? If so then I wouldn't bother with them. They will be covered. You sure they aren't mounting holes, senor? :D

I would consider any holes outside of that area to be flaws in the neck's construction. Where are these holes you speak of and how big/deep are they?

Edited by Southpa
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You sure they aren't mounting holes, senor?

The bottom two holes are 0.2" from the end of the neck. The top holes are just about 2.0" from the bottom holes. All four holes are about 0.3" from the sides of the neck, about 0.35" deep, and about 0.15" in diameter.

I would never use a hole that is 0.2" from the end of a piece of wood for mounting; it's liable to split the wood... so I didn't think that a manufacturer would do that either.

And I'm not concerned with looks; I know that these holes won't be seen once the neck is bolted on. I'm thinking about strength; any break in the grain (ie: a hole or a notch) disrupts the integrity of the wood grain, thus weakening it.

However, epoxy can bridge the break, and provide more strength to the two sides. That's something I learned from repairing gunstocks. Recoil produces devastating torsion; small holes and gouges can cause a gunstock to fail. Tiny details can have a major affect if they occur at a place of extremely high torsion.

So I'm going to fill the holes... I'm just wondering if I should use dowels or brass.

D~s

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If you are really that concerned about the "structural integrity" of the wood then I would not use the brass. Brass readily expands and contracts. Of course, the odds of your guitar being subjected to temperature extremes that would cause the brass to expand or contract enough to either stress the wood or rattle are remote. :D

If you want the safe and inexpensive way just insert some similar wood fragments into the holes with some glue, cut off and sand flat.

Edited by Southpa
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the quick and easy is to push wooden toothpicks into the holes and cut them flush. as many as it takes to pretty much fill the hole and then flood the hole with superglue. if any of the holes happen to correspond or come close to the mounting holes of the guitar you're putting it on the screws will hold properly in the filled hole.

toothpicks are our friends.

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