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Neck Thru Lp


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I've heard it said that oak moves more than a desert nomad on No-Doz, but in a laminated neck, I can't see that it'd be too much of a problem.

Tonally, oak is a bit of a "dull thud" type wood; with all that mahogany, and with a nice heavy LP body, that shouldn't matter either.

Sounds like a very pretty guitar; remember to post pics when you do it!

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What kind of oak is it? The different types really act differently. Red isn't as stiff or heavy as white, for example.

It should be as stable as any other dense hardwood, if it's properly dried. If it's a hundred years old it shouldn't be an issue.

Buy it from someone reliable who can check the moisture content for you.

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What kind of oak is it? The different types really act differently. Red isn't as stiff or heavy as white, for example.

It should be as stable as any other dense hardwood, if it's properly dried. If it's a hundred years old it shouldn't be an issue.

Buy it from someone reliable who can check the moisture content for you.

Thanks for the interest. The oak is white oak. Both the mahogany and the oak were recovered from an old church. It is clear and straight as an arrow. I got enough to build 3 or perhaps 4 guitars. Paid $180.00 for all of it(planed both sides). I would like to put a maple top on it and was thinking that a good source of this may be kitchen cabinet doors. They're about the right thickness, and can usually be found around here for free or dirt cheap. What do you think?

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I like not sending stuff to the dump. The only thing is that you won't find a lot of grain pattern in most kitchen doors.

Check with some kitchen cabinet builders. If no one there builds furniture on the side they sometimes have odd sraps with a lot of figure that they'll sell for lunch or beer money.

White oak tht old shoud be great. The pores in it are almost solid so it doesn't suck up finish. It should also be completely stable.

You may not need to cap it. Some of that stuff has a great grain if it's quarter sawn.

I've used an old finisher's trick on oak. The tannin in it will react with ammonia fumes and turn the wood a really great warm brown color. I build a tent from plastic outside, put whatever I'm fumong in it, and put a bowl of ammonia on a hot plate inside. It would probably take a day or so to do a guitar. You have to check it every hour or so and ammonia fumes are nasty. You absolutely have to wear a mask and goggles that seal.

The first time I saw this trick they did the whole inside of a restaurant,. I was the new guy so I got the job of going in to check the color.

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