Jump to content

Small Bridge With Customizable String Distances!


Recommended Posts

I need a small, low profile bridge, that I could set my own string distances to. On a normal bridge they are too large and I'd like to have a fixed bridge with altered distances between strings.

On a similiar note - using a corective nut or zero fret, do you still need to adjust intonation on the bridge? Also, I need to be able to set the action on it, which makes it harder to make.

Thanks guys

Edited by MasterMinds
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Schaller makes a roller bridge that allows for adjusting string spacing. I've used their TOM style roller bridges and they work very well.

And for your other question, ragardless of what kind of nut, zero fret or whatever you use, you still need to adjust intonation. Unless you are looking to use a simple bar bridge with no intonation adjustment features, eg. ala acoustic guitar, then you better get it right on the money, :D . Personally, I prefer the most adjustment features possible (height, intonation and string spacing) out of a bridge.

Edited by Southpa
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On a similiar note - using a corective nut or zero fret, do you still need to adjust intonation on the bridge?

Thanks guys

zero frets dont compensate intonation! and corrective nuts are a waste of time and money, unless you have perfect pitch, or are **** retentive, then GO AHEAD!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On a similiar note - using a corective nut or zero fret, do you still need to adjust intonation on the bridge?

Thanks guys

zero frets dont compensate intonation! and corrective nuts are a waste of time and money, unless you have perfect pitch, or are **** retentive, then GO AHEAD!

Huh? perfect pitch? That doesn't exist.

I can easily tell when i press an F# that it's sharp, it doesn't take anything but a musicians to detect it - that's why it needs to be corrected.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I completely agree with masterminds on that. To my, only slightly trained, ear (only 3 or 4 years of musical training) it still sounds off on instruments that are not innotated correctly. I have never heard it on any of my guitars but a dulcimer I have has a floating bridge and when it is in the wrog spot you can tell on the higher frets.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I completely agree with masterminds on that.  To my, only slightly trained, ear (only 3 or 4 years of musical training) it still sounds off on instruments that are not innotated correctly.  I have never heard it on any of my guitars but a dulcimer I have has a floating bridge and when it is in the wrog spot you can tell on the higher frets.

more what I meant to say is that I would use a zero fret, but they dont compensate intonation. I also wouldn't bother with a compensated nut as I feel that they are just another gimmick for the anally retentive who must be perfectly intonated beyond human recogniton all the time.

if a chord is slightly out of tune in the open position and not at the 5th fret, then play it at the fifth fret, and vice versa.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

i been playing music and listeing to music for bout 5 years now ( different insturments) and i cant tell the difference between a F or F sharp, does that make me less of a muscian? of course not, is my guitar out of tune a few cents? all the time, do i care? heck no

like previously stated, unless your really **** retentive, why bother ??

Curtis

Link to comment
Share on other sites

the bridge question was answered above..get a schaller or abm roller bridge. you have adjustments left/right, up/down and front back. check out www.allparts.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

i been playing music and listeing to music for bout 5 years now ( different insturments) and i cant tell the difference between a F or F sharp, does that make me less of a muscian? of course not, is my guitar out of tune a few cents? all the time, do i care? heck no

like previously stated, unless your really **** retentive, why bother ??

Curtis

5 years and you can't tell the difference between an F and an F#? Maybe you should turn down your gain bud. That's a half step. We're talking about minute difference in pitch. If you can't tell the difference between an F and an F#, I really wonder how you can play guitar at all. Not meant as a bash, I really am puzzled.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Devon, maybe what he was saying is he can't identify a single note that is played such as an F or F#. A lot of people hear the intervals and can tell if there is a half / full / one and a half step ect.. between tones but can't identify that single tone as a specific note.

MasterMinds- I have read through the string of posts and questions you have put up very recently. I am not sure what you are trying to figure out. You seem to have gone from very basic questions about setting up your intonation on your guitar. To trying to create a neck that uses some kinda new theoretically better fretting system, as well as a unique scale length that is very different from the more customary lengths. I don't want to give you the idea that I am saying not to build a guitar any way other than how you want to (it's your baby). I just get the impression that you are throwing out questions kinda wildly. It may make your project a lot more fun and succesful if you just get a very good book to refer to and get a little better foundation. I really hope you don't take my comments the wrong way. If a good book to refer to helped you out 1/4 as much as it helped me, you would be glad to have it. Peace, and best of luck to ya-Rich

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I can easily tell when i press an F# that it's sharp, it doesn't take anything but a musicians to detect it - that's why it needs to be corrected.

it does not need to be corrected

F# (in its nature) should be sharp...if it was flat, it would be an F.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You're clinically inept.

By the way guys - I've decided to go with the superbness of optical pickups, which detect the same string vibrations without interfering the strings with magnets, do it despite the material the strings are made of, give off absolute no buzz, no muffled sounds, do not reduce sustain with magnets, and pick up every harmonic even beyond an audible range...

Vastly superior to a magnet, with no down side.

It is one unit within the bridge, so that solves my bridge problem - just hope I can slightly alter their width!

I can easily tell when i press an F# that it's sharp, it doesn't take anything but a musicians to detect it - that's why it needs to be corrected.

it does not need to be corrected

F# (in its nature) should be sharp...if it was flat, it would be an F.

Edited by MasterMinds
Link to comment
Share on other sites

wrong. the sound is no different than the variety that occurs with magnetic pickups.

magnetic pickups each are different and cause irreplaceable tonal choices that you are stuck with - unless you change pickups. optical pickups pickup the entire overtone signature - they leave it up to you to shape the result tonally - so you can choose what you want. so no - they don't sound bad - they sound like you want them to.

and it's not digital, it's analog. so that argument won't work. it just detects the vibration through a different method than a magnetic field. and i doubt you've heard them, else you wouldn't say that.

with no down side.

You mean like the fact that they don't sound good? :D

Edited by MasterMinds
Link to comment
Share on other sites

not trying to be sarcastic or an arse here (for once)

but if they're so spectacular, then why aren't more guitars sold with them as stock?

edit - damn your post posting edits :D

Edited by weezerboy
Link to comment
Share on other sites

they are.

they're new, the most recent design is less than 8 months old.

23 major manufacturers already bought options to the pickups and will be carrying them in models this summer into early next year.

so, they are going to be with them - it was merel a matter of solid testing, read above for details.

to put it simply - the entirity of the vibration is detected, not just some choices of a pickup - and it leaves it up to the artist to control the changes from the true tone. what the optics picks up is essentially what your ear would hear without any tonal arrangement.

and I say again - since someone will say this - it's ANALOG, not digital.

it uses the same hookup on the guitar, nothings different, just the internals.......

....the major change is that any medium can be used for strings - the medium DOES change the sound of course - but this means you're open to ideas.

not trying to be sarcastic or an arse here (for once)

but if they're so spectacular, then why aren't more guitars sold with them as stock?

weezerboy - yes, sorry for the edits i realized i was too non-explanatory :D

Edited by MasterMinds
Link to comment
Share on other sites

i been playing music and listeing to music for bout 5 years now ( different insturments) and i cant tell the difference between a F or F sharp, does that make me less of a muscian? of course not, is my guitar out of tune a few cents? all the time, do i care? heck no

like previously stated, unless your really **** retentive, why bother ??

Curtis

finally, somebody who just like to make music!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...