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Lacquer And Glue


Houdini
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I want to see if anyone else has this problem. I used standard elmers wood glue to glue up the blanks for a tele body I am making. When I finish the body with lacquer based paint and finish (i.e. Krylon acrylic paint/lacquer) it seems to eat away the glue. The reason I am saying this is because when I start to wet sand the guitar, the join line always seems to reappear and feels like a little groove in the guitar despite having been sanded flat before finishing. Is my problem that the glue is dissolving, or is there a better glue to use besides standard wood glue? :D

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I want to see if anyone else has this problem.  I used standard elmers wood glue to glue up the blanks for a tele body I am making.  When I finish the body with lacquer based paint and finish (i.e. Krylon acrylic paint/lacquer) it seems to eat away the glue.  The reason I am saying this is because when I start to wet sand the guitar, the join line always seems to reappear and feels like a little groove in the guitar despite having been sanded flat before finishing.  Is my problem that the glue is dissolving, or is there a better glue to use besides standard wood glue? :D

LOL. Bad mistake brother! You shouldnt be using elmers wood glue to join the pieces. Im pretty sure you should be using titebond. im not sure whether or not the glue is being eaten away :D

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I want to see if anyone else has this problem.  I used standard elmers wood glue to glue up the blanks for a tele body I am making.  When I finish the body with lacquer based paint and finish (i.e. Krylon acrylic paint/lacquer) it seems to eat away the glue.  The reason I am saying this is because when I start to wet sand the guitar, the join line always seems to reappear and feels like a little groove in the guitar despite having been sanded flat before finishing.  Is my problem that the glue is dissolving, or is there a better glue to use besides standard wood glue? :D

titebond is about the best

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For everything you always wanted to know about glue, use the search function. I searched for "elmers wood glue" and got several hits. Here's one of the links:

http://projectguitar.ibforums.com/index.ph...lmers+wood+glue

From what I've read on this forum, Titebond is the favorite hands down.

There shouldn't be that big of a difference between elmers and titebond, although I think elmers creeps a little more. They're both the same type of glue. I've used elmers on all kinds of wood and all kinds of furniture projects, and never had a problem with my glue lines after wet sanding or finishing.

Are you sure your joints were nice and tight before glueing? Did you put enough glue in the joint? Did you leave it clamped up long enough for the glue to set?

Sorry, I don't mean to question your glueing methods, I'm just brainstorming some ideas that might be the cause of your problem. I don't think your problem is caused by the glue itself, unless it's a bad batch of glue or something.

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Yea, my joins were pretty good and I used plenty of glue, I'm just scratching my head trying to figure out if the glue could shrink that much after it dried, or if the lacquer somehow was eating it away. When I prepared the surface of the wood before lacquering, it was nice and smooth. It wasn't until I started painting that a groove appeared where the glue line was. :D

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The lacquer is shrinking, not the glue. Try waiting much longer before levelling, or try spot-filling the joint with a high solids finish or filler which will shrink less. Your surface can feel plenty flat before you apply finish and still show lots of unevenness once you apply the first coats.

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Lacquer doesn't eat PVA glue.

What is probably happening is that the glue is continueing to dry and shrink a little bit.

The line is there it just doesn't show up until you coat it wiht shiney lacquer or other dipped in glass finish.

Build and sand just that area until it cooperates.

We built an eight foot long four foot wide inlaid conference table for an architect and he wanted a flawless high gloss finish. I don't even want to guess how many coats we wound up spraying and snding.

High gloss shows every single flaw. Satin doesn't and that's why the factories sell satin finish for less.

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