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New Sander


erikbojerik
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I went around & trued up the edges of some bodies yesterday, it works very nicely. It would be nice to have a little bit larger work surface, but then again it saves space...I can store it on a shelf. I also like the tool-free changing of the drums & belts. Dust collection is OK with a shop vac, could be better, but then again I'm picky about dust.

My reasons for going to 600:

1) I HATE hand-sanding cutaways.

2) I've got some pretty hard woods coming down the pike, that I'll be finishing with...

3) Tru-Oil, which does make the scratches show up.

4) I HATE hand-sanding cutaways (did I mention that?).

I'm taking everything down to 600 these days.

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My reasons for going to 600:

1) I HATE hand-sanding cutaways.

2) I've got some pretty hard woods coming down the pike, that I'll be finishing with...

3) Tru-Oil, which does make the scratches show up.

4) I HATE hand-sanding cutaways (did I mention that?).

Do you hate hand sanding cutaways?? :D Tell us how you really feel..

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I too have been eyeing that sander. I dont imagine it would be too tough to make a larger auxillary table ir you wanted to. One question, how do you convert it to the oscilating sander? any pics in this setup?

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To remove the belt sander, you loosen the belt tension (small metal tab behind the knob on the top-right), then remove the knobs on top. An insert covers the cavity, but leaves a hole for the spindles; a shaft is left sticking up on the left (the large drum of the belt sander) and that's what you slide your spindles onto. Washers top & bottom, then replace the left knob and you're Captain Spindle.

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  • 1 year later...

how would you go about making your own higher grit sleeves without say... gluing them to the actual drum which would kinda shorten the life of said drum drastically. I'm thinking about buying the small grizzly one so I thought I'd check up on how much you still like it, etc. etc. because I not only hate sanding cut-aways as much as you, I hate sanding ALL forms of the sides of guitars!

Chris

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lol dude i just posted a topic asking if anyone had one of those. I almost bought one today myself, let me know how it is please, cause i dont think there are many left up here.

I have had mine for about 6 years and it has been trouble free. It is a very handy tool for edge sanding but I also pre-radius fretboards with it, smooth up scarf joints, etc. Was very handy for the horn on this one:

http://i79.photobucket.com/albums/j140/hyd...full_front3.jpg

I would like to eventually get a large belt sander (6 x 48 or larger) but in the meantime, this sander fits the bill perfectly and was well worth the money - although it was a gift :D

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i'm thinkin' about either the grizzly $130 one, or their bigger $199 one... dunno yet, both are damned cheap... but judging by the speed my current drill chucked sanding drums rip off wood as they whirl (they have 80 and 120 grit sheets... but I've never used the 80) why would you EVER want to use anything rougher than 220 grit?! you'd be going along trying to just finish sand and then BAM end up with a guitar side with ridges in it?! I'm still scared of this happening with 220 and below.... maybe I'm thinking these spin faster than they do? Either way, anyone... shedding light on how to make your own sleeves for the drum??

Chris

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Hey Chris (et al),

What it means by "oscillating" is that the spindle/belt moves up and down in a smooth motion about once every 2 seconds (in addition to spinning), so that you don't get those ridges.

So far so good with this item (except I've gone & lost the smallest rubber spindle...). I haven't yet gotten around to making finer-grit drums, but what I'll probably do is to stick some finer-grit paper over the top of some used 150-grit drums. You could also purchase a spare set (or 4) of the rubber spindles.

No problems at all with the grit peeling on these. The small belt does not (in any way) replace a nice longer belt sander, but it is nice for stuff like rough-radiusing fretboards (as noted) and shaping braces for acoustics. No regrets.

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  • 2 weeks later...

So I went ahead and did it. I ended up buying the smaller of the two grizzly ones. That $129 one. I figured that one was better for me since it was smalla nd I can stow it in a dorm, and I didn't see the point in spending like $80 more for their next size up when all it did was add stands, a TINY bit more horsepower, and actually LOST table size!? But hey, it may be their cheeapest, but it's a 4.5" spindle, with 5/8" stroke elngth, which IMO is PLENTY if all I'm using itt for is sanding guitar sides.

Chris

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