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Good Price?


sexybeast

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Honestly, if it's in good shape (ie, all the screws are there, the blade cap fits nice and tight, no stripped out holes, all the adjusters work smoothly, most of the jappaning is still on there, the rust is only surface/no pitting, the sole is square to the sides, level, minimal rust/no serious pitting, no welds anywhere, no damage to the metal), and particularly it's a #7 that's true and straight, it could very well be worth the almost 80 bucks. You'll have to take it apart to check it out properly, though. Find out the year (Stanley Blood and Gore website might be of help), which might help you a little.

From what I hear, true, straight #7 planes with metalwork in good condition, particularly the far superior older/early 1900's models, aren't all that common. Look on eBay, see what kinds of prices those old planes are going for. Those 'used Stanleys' are tools I'd gladly pay more for than new Stanleys.

I got a #5 in good condition via a friend, paid 35 bucks for it, plus 15 bucks shipping to me, and it still needs some cleanup work. All the bits are good, it's pretty much straight, tiny crack in the brazilian RW handle, but it was pretty much a steal. And keep in mind #5's are much more commonly found in good condition than #7's.

Do some research on the date, etc. and make your decision. Maybe see if you can haggle the price down a little.

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I guess that's true, I was just assuming it was one of the "antique shop" junk places. If it's really quite a bit older, the Stanleys were really good. I have a friend that has an older one, and it's really nice. Mine was flat and square, so maybe I just got a really good deal. It's newer I believe, though. You can find good #6's all the time for good prices, though. The plane is worth $80, I'm just saying it can be had for much less if you look a bit harder.

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It came both ways, flat and corregated. That's a pretty good price for an early Stanley. Don't listen to the cheapskates here. A beat up plane takes me maybe 8 hours to restore to real working shape and some are messed up enough that they're just looking at planes.

Look at the tool collecter web sites and e-bay. You'll be hard pressed to fing a good to excellent No.7 for that price.

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Call me a cheapskate if you want, but it took under 2 hours to get this thing shaving as good as planes I've borrowed from a 30 year woodworking vet. You're all advising him to buy the plane straight out, but it's from an antiques shop. You really can't have any idea what kind of working condition the plane is in from what he's told us. I've seen #7s for $85 that were pieces of crap, and like I said I got mine for $12. I -know- how my plane cuts. A good plane doesn't have to be expensive. I have a #6 that my parents got in a box of cast iron skillets. Get this. Has a tapered hock replacement blade in it. I think they got the whole box for about $10. The plane isn't anything to write home about, but I swapped the blade out with another #6 I have.

I've heard that the only real difference between the solid soled, and the channel soled planes is the speed with which you can true them up. I've never used one, though. Supposedly it cuts down on friction, but I know a couple people that said it really doesn't.

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I agree about the corrugated vs smooth sole. I don't notice a bit of difference. i own some of both. Same size, same plane different sole. I rub a little candle wax on mine and plane away. I have read that it was a marketing idea. This usually means something thought up to sell stuff to people who actually work and know what they're doing by people who don't do either. Yeah I'm cynical.

You can wait and run all over everywhere and hope that you stumble on a good No7 that has escaped notice by all of the tool collecting and dealing vultures, or you can go ahead and pay a fair price for a tool in hand. I used to hit the yard sales and flea markets scavenging for deals. I now spend the same time in my shop woodworking and pay someone else to dig through boxes of skillets and junk to find the stuff and bring it to me. Your choice.

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