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Switch For Batteries


Bytrix
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Having recently bought an EMG 81 and 85 seperately I'm ready to install them in my Ibanez DTX120 and have been considering using two batteries after numerous reports of it sounding 'better'. This does mean a bit of routing out of the back of the guitar for batteries to fit but nothing too complicated.

Now I was wondering, it should be easy enough to put a switch leading from one battery so that it is removed or added to the circuit. Switching the circuit from one to two batteries. But would there be any advantage in this. Would I notice the difference in sound between the one-battery and two-battery sounds? Would I always want to run two batteries (as everyone says it's 'better')?

Any thoughts on this?

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The choice is between running the whole lot at 9v or 18v, each of which (apparently) gives you a different sound. A switch to tap one of the batteries in and out is certainly possible, although I'm not sure the difference will be great enough to make that a useful feature. As I understand it, 18v gives you a touch more headroom. Something like that.

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This is from EMG:

"Can I use multiple batteries?

Yes. If you've got room for multiple batteries in your guitar, you can use two batteries wired in series to power your onboard circuitry at 18 volts. The output level will not appreciably increase, but you'll have increased headroom and crisper transients. This is especially useful for percussive/slap bass styles where you can generate enormous instantaneous power levels across the entire frequency spectrum. You can also wire two batteries in parallel to provide a regular 9 volt supply but with much longer lifespan between battery changes.

Although most of our products are rated for 27 volts, we recommend a maximum of 18 volts. The additional benefits of 27 vs. 18 volts are negligible."

I would just go with full time 18V if I were you. The switching would not be worth the effort.

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I highly suggest making an "outboard" switch. Even if you just leave it hanging out the back of the guitar during testing. You're probably going to find that you want one or the other, not both. Also a "live" switch will probably produce a large popping sound. So there's almost no reason to have it switchable during play. I did a battery on/off for a very sophisticated Bartolini system, and it requires the user to wait a second between switching from "battery off" to "full active" so the system can get charged up. If he switches instantly it pops, if he waits a second it doesn't. So it's a 3 position switch and the first is "battery off & mute" middle is "battery on but passive" and the third is "active"

So I can't think of a way for you to switch between 9 & 18 volts in stages, or without a pop. You'd almost have to have a mute switch to throw while you were transitioning.

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i have a switch setup for my bass

two emg passive jazz with a emg active preamp

i had it set up so that i can switch to passive if the battery dies, which works

but it does not reduce the ammount of drain on the battery itself, so i still go through batteries lots

so adding a switch to go from passive to active is kind of a waste, didn't really help except that it gave me a signal when the battery died and let me play in a passive mode through bypassing the battery and preamp

both passive and active sound good

though its seems that the more junk you stick between the pickup and output ofthe guitar the more you increas chances of phasing, huming, and all around crappy noise

was a novel idea but for me it wasnt worth it

Edited by ebun
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If it was me, I'd put it on, cause I love having loads of switches to play with. It wouldn't be hard, and youd only have to drill a small holes (or use a push/pull). I'd use a SPDT toggle, so you could select both or one or the other (could be helpful for gigs and stuff if you run out). Like a Lanny's petrol tank :D I'd also use Gotoh battery boxes so you can change the batteries easily.

Edited by Calum_Barrow
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If it was me, I'd put it on, cause I love having loads of switches to play with. It wouldn't be hard, and youd only have to drill a small holes (or use a push/pull). I'd use a SPDT toggle, so you could select both or one or the other (could be helpful for gigs and stuff if you run out). Like a Lanny's petrol tank :D I'd also use Gotoh battery boxes so you can change the batteries easily.

i agree. the switch from active to passive woudl be nice onstage if you run out of juice in the middle of a gig. but i dont think switching back and forth from 9v to 18v would even be worth it. Im actually thinking about adding an active/passive switch to my ESP, i have two active emg soapbars.

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