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Black Ice Mod?


Bluetic
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I am a total electronics idiod. B) Could somebody put this Black Ice mod into total laymans terms for me? :D I would like to try it but I totally dont understand the schematics in the tutorial section. You say Schotty diodes? Are there any specific values on these? Where do I solder them to? Does this replace the cap already there? I am truly sorry for being so ignorant on this subject. But would like to learn more. Thanks in advance for any help on this. :D

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i was lookin at the black ice mods and decided i didnt like the idea, going to build a treble booster instead :D

Treble booster Schematic (old but i found all the parts)

Hey cool...you know, someone should start selling kits like this...it'd be fun to have.

My question --is there a way to get a similar effect WITHOUT resorting to a battery driven device?

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can someone simplify the schematic for the treble booster thingy? Its gonna be my first electronic build. Im basically clueless on what the symbols mean, i guess what im asking for is a current list of parts i need to purchase and can i get them at radio shack? and if some one is could make a simple drawing or something to that effect of the how to assemble that would be great. I have looked at the schematic over and over and just can't get going. any help???? :D

Edited by BJPUC
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Umm...

It says exatly what parts you need in the box that says "components". Just print out that page and bring it radio shack and they'll know what parts to give you. :D

and the picture under the schematic even tells you where to layout the components and how to wire it up. You can't get more simplified than that. :D

With that layout and the schematic if you still don't know whats going on I sugest you check out the info found in this pinned thread...

Edited by Godin SD
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This i probrably not linked to what all you guys are saying, but it is still conserning the black ice.

As you know, there is a tutorial of the black ice on pg.com that is ez as pie. 2 diodes neg-pos, pos-neg grounded, you know which one. Not bothered with the link, but anyways I was wondering if it is possible to use 1N4148 instead of the recommeneded ones they suggested. Its becos I want to try it out quite and those are the only ones I have spare left over from my TS-808 project. Are there any retrictions, or should I give it a try?

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...I was wondering if it is possible to use 1N4148 instead of the recommeneded ones...
It's extremely unlikely that you'l get any results at all with 1N4148s ( or any standard silicon diodes) unless your pickups are invredibly high output. The reason for using schottky diodes is their low forward voltage, which allows them to clip at much lower levels.
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The reason for using schottky diodes is their low forward voltage, which allows them to clip at much lower levels.

All true. Theres another effect as well. I made a rig to measure current and voltage across a Schotky at very small signals. Knowing those, you can work out an effective resistance for the diode

()R = voltage/current), which changes with voltage.

It turns out that as the voltage reduces to zero and becomes negative, the Schotkys resistance is continuosly changing. From +20mV to -20mV, resistance changes from about 70k to 40k, and continues to change with larger signals. Those resistances are right in the money zone for changing the tone of the pickup. Hence the schotky is changing the sound in a non-linear way all the way down through the decay phase, and way below their forward voltage.

By contrast, as silicon diodes approach zero voltage, their reistance is several mega Ohms, which has no effect on the signal, and they only clip as their forward voltage is approached.

John

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It turns out that as the voltage reduces to zero and becomes negative, the Schotkys resistance is continuosly changing.
That's pretty much true of any diode, since the forward voltage varies with current and the relation is nonlinear.

http://www.ortodoxism.ro/datasheets/SGSTho...ics/mXyyrst.pdf

Take a look a figs 6-1 and 7-1 for an idea of the I vs V properties of a 1N5817 - they're not a lot different from the curves for a 1N914, but at a much lower voltage.

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