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Tremelo Problem


drmthr76
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I tried adjusting the vintage style tremelo on my strat and noticed when i retightened the claw screws one of them would not tighten like it was stripped.

Does anyone have suggestions on what might have happened?

Clueless noob.

You could try using a bigger screw. Like I said before, you could get a bigger size screw but it might not hold. Is it a bigsby?

If it is a bigsby, what model is it?

http://www.bigsbyguitars.com/intro.html

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He says quite clearly what it is: it's the screw which holds the spring claw on a strat tremolo. If you don't know what that is, many folks would question whether you're qualified to answer his question...

DRM: drill out and refill the hole, prefferably with a hardwood dowel. Once it's had overnight to dry, redrill the hole at the appropriate diameter, and screw back the claw.

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I tried adjusting the vintage style tremelo on my strat and noticed when i retightened the claw screws one of them would not tighten like it was stripped.

Does anyone have suggestions on what might have happened?

Clueless noob.

You could try using a bigger screw. If that fails, there is really nothing you can do except get that piece replaced. Are you sure its stripped? Like I said before, you could get a bigger size screw but it might not hold. Your better off trying to order that piece. Is it a bigsby?

Is it the screw that holds it to the body?

If it is a bigsby, what model is it?

http://www.bigsbyguitars.com/intro.html

This is an easy fix. I'll eat my hat if the screw stripped out before the wood did.

Just take a toothpick, jam it in the hole with some good wood glue like Titebond, trim it flush and put the screw back in. You could go a step further and redrill the hole and fill it with a dowel and then redrill for the screw but the toothpick trick should be more than good enough.

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drill out and refill the hole, prefferably with a hardwood dowel. Once it's had overnight to dry, redrill the hole at the appropriate diameter, and screw back the claw.

+1

This is the thorough and professional way to do it.

Just take a toothpick, jam it in the hole with some good wood glue like Titebond, trim it flush and put the screw back in.

+1

This is the quick and dirty way to do it.

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