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Scalloping And Inlaying


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Hi,

I have this old SX strat neck laying around and was bored so took to the last fret with a file since I was gonna scallop it anyway just didn't have a dremel yet (still don't) and the inlay fell out. I had cream inlays and am fond of abalone for everything so I bought some abalone inlays. Now I was wondering if I should scallop the whole board, glue the inlays and then go over the inlays so that they match the scallop? Or should I inlay first? How would I get the original inlays out (dot inlays). Should I put these inlays a little deeper since I'm scalloping?

Thanks,

Cozi

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Hi,

    I have this old SX strat neck laying around and was bored so took to the last fret with a file since I was gonna scallop it anyway just didn't have a dremel yet (still don't) and the inlay fell out. I had cream inlays and am fond of abalone for everything so I bought some abalone inlays. Now I was wondering if I should scallop the whole board, glue the inlays and then go over the inlays so that they match the scallop? Or should I inlay first? How would I get the original inlays out (dot inlays). Should I put these inlays a little deeper since I'm scalloping?

Thanks,

            Cozi

Inlay first. Take out the old ones by drilling. Use a bit same diameter as the current inlays, and then all you'll do is drill out the old ones. And yes, go a little deeper if you're scalloping the board. You'll need to think how deep you're going to scallop, and modify the depth/thickness of the inlay material accordingly.

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Also be aware that with abalone inlays, your scalloping runs a risk of either going through the abalone or at least may significantly alter the appearance of the inlay. The color and figure are not constant throughout the thickness of the inlay. Just take all of those things into account when setting the depth -- thicker inlays are helpful.

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Yeah, sanding a steep curve into something around .050" doesn't seem like a safe way to go, imo.

on the two necks I scalloped, I went with white plastic dots that I made myself, and they were about 1/16" (.062") thick, and only 5mm around.

If they would have been bigger than 5mm, I could very well have had problems on the edges being too thin. And the plastic is *solid* white. Most shell gets transparent when it gets real thin.

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I did scalloped my Epi LP neck, and it was a terrifying ordeal... Just because the inlays. I started a thread and Brian posted a pic of one of his jobs so I decide to do it.

Now be aware that the inlays on mine were plastic and thicker than the real shell ones. You could, if you don't want to get the pearl damaged, inlay it a bit deeper about 1/16"and cover it with acrylic (and no, not the paint kind), but something like this and once cured swcallop the piece, I suggest you don't go below the acrylick, that way you retain the sheen of the inlayed piece.

Here is a pic of mine and as you can see all the inlays survived pretty well.

DSC01083.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v195/Maiden69/DSC01080.jpg

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