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ultraman
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I've been thinking about getting a laptop for the very same reasons as well. However, I would urge you to look at the Compaq V2000 series laptops with the Celeron-M or Pentium-M. Likely to have better performance for the games, plus a better battery life. If you can splurge just a few hundred more, look at the Dell 6000.

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That laptop isnt going to stand up to much gaming dude

Graphics    ATI Radeon Xpress 200M With 32MB DDR

Not many laptops are good for gaming unless you want to drop some serious money, stick to a desktop machine for gaming :D

Also the 40gb Drive might be a lil small if you do a lot of recording on it, but apart from that, it should be ok

~~ TS ~~

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I've been thinking about getting a laptop for the very same reasons as well. However, I would urge you to look at the Compaq V2000 series laptops with the Celeron-M or Pentium-M. Likely to have better performance for the games, plus a better battery life. If you can splurge just a few hundred more, look at the Dell 6000.

Even with the Dell, it's not enough. I got a 6000 for my oldest for college and tried some audio work on it a bit before passing it off. The Celeron and Moble processors are simply weak for gaming and audio production, I don't trust AMD for anything. The worst part is the hard drives are THE SLOWEST drives you can buy, actually for a desktop you can't even buy them that slow.

If your looking for a general purpose laptop you'll be fine, but otherwise don't expect it to be happy when trying to use it for excessive processing like heavy 3D games or audio production.

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For gaming and audio get a laptop with dedicated video memory or lots o' ram. Depends on the games you like though, FPS games arent going to be the greatest on any laptop.

I did a bit of research and for the money landed on a HP Zd8205us. 128mb of ram dedicated to video. So it plays World of Warcraft and other games well.

The downside, sort of, on mine is the 17" widescreen means it weighs 12lbs.

As far as drive space I run exeternal firewire drive out of the back of my firepod for recording.

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Even with the Dell, it's not enough.  I got a 6000 for my oldest for college and tried some audio work on it a bit before passing it off.  The Celeron and Moble processors are simply weak for gaming and audio production, I don't trust AMD for anything.  The worst part is the hard drives are THE SLOWEST drives you can buy, actually for a desktop you can't even buy them that slow.

If your looking for a general purpose laptop you'll be fine, but otherwise don't expect it to be happy when trying to use it for excessive processing like heavy 3D games or audio production.

I agree with everything else you said, but why the distrust of AMD? They've been showing up intel for the last two years now, and their price points are better.

GBT

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Even with the Dell, it's not enough.  I got a 6000 for my oldest for college and tried some audio work on it a bit before If your looking for a general purpose laptop you'll be fine, but otherwise don't expect it to be happy when trying to use it for excessive processing like heavy 3D games or audio production.

I agree with everything else you said, but why the distrust of AMD? They've been showing up intel for the last two years now, and their price points are better.

Not a matter of distrust, I just cut to the chase when processor instruction set differences come in to play. Both games and audio software engines are extremely resource intensive and have been coded sometimes for optimization at a processor level in assembler. The foundation of the 8x88's (intel) instruction set hasn't changed and is still most often covered, AMD's is covered more so than ever but not universally and when you have many software processes talking to a processor, you want them to speak the same language, so to speak. :D

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Not a matter of distrust, I just cut to the chase when processor instruction set differences come in to play.  Both games and audio software engines are extremely resource intensive and have been coded sometimes for optimization at a processor level in assembler.  The foundation of the 8x88's (intel) instruction set hasn't changed and is still most often covered, AMD's is covered more so than ever but not universally and when you have many software processes talking to a processor, you want them to speak the same language, so to speak.  :D

It appears you're talking about additions to the base x86 instruction set like SIMD/SSE and applications that are optimized to use them. AMD and Intel both implement a complete x86 instruction set in their past and current x86 architecture processors, and they curently both support the full compliment of SSE/SSE2/SSE3 extensions. While Intel had SSE3 support before AMD, AMD supports it now so there is no performance increase from SSE3 optimized code on an Intel P4 that isn't seen on an AMD Athlon 64 as well. So it's not really an issue of compatible instruction sets, and the list of SSE3 optimized software is still pretty short. Pro Tools HD doesn't support any SSE exentions/optimization. Cakewalk Sonar supports SSE-SSE3, but it's not processor exclusive at this point so it's a non-issue.

GBT

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DO NOT USE COMPAQS!!!!!

I'VE OWNED 2 PRESARIOS AND THEY BOTH DIED ON ME IN LESS THAN A YEAR.

FOR ESSAYS AND RECORDING I WOULD DEFINATELY ADVISE GETTING A POWERBOOK. BUT GAMING..I'M NOT TOO SURE.

I MEAN, WHO DOESN'T WANT A MAC NOWADAYS. GATES WILL SOON BECOME THE BUTLER OF ITS GROWING RIVALRY!!!

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It appears you're talking about additions to the base x86 instruction set like SIMD/SSE and applications that are optimized to use them.  AMD and Intel both implement a complete x86 instruction set in their past and current x86 architecture processors, and they curently both support the full compliment of SSE/SSE2/SSE3 extensions.  While Intel had SSE3 support before AMD, AMD supports it now so there is no performance increase from SSE3 optimized code on an Intel P4 that isn't seen on an AMD Athlon 64 as well.  So it's not really an issue of compatible instruction sets, and the list of SSE3 optimized software is still pretty short.  Pro Tools HD doesn't support any SSE exentions/optimization.  Cakewalk Sonar supports SSE-SSE3, but it's not processor exclusive at this point so it's a non-issue. 

Yes you're right, I got a little '8' happy or my brain jumped back to the 8-bit days...your call. :D

I understand all of your points, where I was going is (basically as you said) not everything is coded the same. Even VST plugins get pretty system demanding and don't want to work with each other once in a while. I'm probably a bit over the top in my concerns but it is with due cause, I've been fighting the system/audio/video war for years, still have a fully function Protools v2 MAC (yes that's old) I keep on the side and all the struggles with that platform have ended for me, but I still can't help keeping my eyes wide open. :D

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+1 on the not wanting a MAC.

When I was shopping for my newest laptop, I went into the apple store to talk with them about what I'd need. I could meet my demands by buying a system that was well over 2.5x the price of the laptop I ended up buying. Thats a lot of cash to spend on mics, ram, hard drive space, and cap'n morgan.

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