Jump to content

Onboard Delay Effect


Pex657
 Share

Recommended Posts

Sorry, I think you'd be out of luck there...

I looked at doing something like this but even DIY circuits are thin on the ground. Probably the best bet is to gut out an effects pedal...see what you can find on eBay or those new Behringer effects are small and cheap.

Also be aware that delay effects tend to eat batteries, if they work reliably at all on them...so you may have to look into remotely powering up the guitar. I'm also interested in this but haven't come across much their either. It would be of particular benifit to my sustainer project.

If you were going to go remote, you could build in a whole multi effects unit like a second hand zoom or something which would give you a whole range of effects and amp sims too that you could program and select through with two little push buttons...just a thought.

But you got to have the power...psw

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you're using the delay for echo or slap-back effects, then you want it as almost the very last thing in the signal chain (reverb being very last).

So if you put it in the guitar body, you'd have to send your signal out of the guitar, then back in for the delay, then back out again. :D Oy!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Couldn't you use like phantom power from a Pre-amp to power it?

No I mean't powering without batterries, from a wall wart up the guitar lead.

If you're using the delay for echo or slap-back effects, then you want it as almost the very last thing in the signal chain

generally yes, how ever for special effects that you may want to do (andrew Belew sound effects and looping, etc) on board makes a little sense.

U'd probably find it hard fitting one in a guitar, and as with all delay effects, they eat batteries

Hence the need for external power...

A full multi effects unit on the guitar is not such a crazy idea, if you can get it cheap, like the sound, and are happy with it being only in one guitar...

So... Ya know. The point is, is it worth it.

Quite possibly not...good points, all of them...psw

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you have a HUGE control cavity, you could buy an Arion SAD-3 for $29 and re-house it in your guitar. Drawback - eats 9V batteries really quickly and only has a delay time of 250-300mS.

The PT80 is nice little design, but I can't remember the delay time - http://www.freeinfosociety.com/electronics...o/pt80delay.pdf

And I hear good things about the Rebote 2 Delay - http://www.tonepad.com/project.asp?id=27

And the PT2399 delay at www.geofex.com can get you about 350mS - http://www.geofex.com/PCB_layouts/Layouts/pt2399.pdf

You might be able to build one of these circuits small enough to fit in a guitar control cavity. Good luck!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

you know the little dano pedals are cheap small and dont' really consume batterys. might i suggest an alternate way of powering it. stereo jack would be best then use an exteranl batt pack on your strap like a wireless unit. theres a great light weight battery that is around 9v fully charged and has a 5400mah battery with its own charger. perhaps thats a little extreme

can you smell waht the ed is cooking.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I was wondering if there is some where on the market something like a Delay effect that can be put onboard in the guitar?

Thanks,

-Pex657

[/quoteHi stewmac.com have a Miniature passive guitar overdrive circuit with a "tweed amp" crunch!

Black Ice Overdrive

Encapsulated in a 1/2" cube, Black Ice circuitry replaces the capacitor on a guitar's tone control. It transforms the tone control into a battery-free overdrive control, letting the player dial in smooth variable overdrive "crunch."

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Phantom power is almost a no-brainer, so long as you don't have to supply much current - just run the DC voltage through the same conductor as the signal, and block DC at each end with a large cap. Obviously, you'll need a very stable, quiet power supply, since any ripple or noise on the power buss will be coupled into the output, but it shouldn't be too difficult to clean up a 9 volt power supply.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Phantom power is almost a no-brainer, so long as you don't have to supply much current - just run the DC voltage through the same conductor as the signal, and block DC at each end with a large cap. Obviously, you'll need a very stable, quiet power supply, since any ripple or noise on the power buss will be coupled into the output, but it shouldn't be too difficult to clean up a 9 volt power supply.

is this the same LK that told me not to do this with my sustainer or did aliens take over your brain???????????????????? just wondering.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

...did aliens take over your brain????????????????????
I appreciate the concern, but you gotta pay attention, Ed - you obviously missed this fairly important point!

...so long as you don't have to supply much current...
Is a small digital delay (even a notorious battery killer) likely to pull as much current as a power amp and a driver coil? I could easily be wrong, but I tend to doubt it.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Doesnt EMG used to have pot with effect? I think i saw that years ago somewhere.

The other way, that i did with my bass player's guitar is that i built the korg pandora in his guitarbody and got rid of all the pots except for a volume. I'll get you a pic of that. So on front side you see the lcd and the buttons and it mounts from behind where i did just a cover so he can take it out if he needs it for something else.Allso i did a cover for a front side so when it is out it dont looks odd.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That sounds cool croaticum

Here's a pic if that alesis guitar

FXguitar1.jpg

thanks Gorecki

AS for powering a delay...hmmm...my Boss DD3 is very sensitive to power supply and eats batteries. And certainly the sustainer is a different kettle of fish. However, maybe you could use one of these ideas to charge a small on board battery when the device is turned off but the guitar still plugged in....

psw

Link to comment
Share on other sites

abrain.jpg

is this the same LK that told me not to do this with my sustainer or did aliens take over your brain????????????????????

abrain3.jpg

clearly it is a more technical problem than the above...perhaps a device like this below would provide the required current....

abrain2.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you have a HUGE control cavity, you could buy an Arion SAD-3 for $29 and re-house it in your guitar. Drawback - eats 9V batteries really quickly and only has a delay time of 250-300mS

I was also found Arion DDM-1 that is also $29

So if you put it in the guitar body, you'd have to send your signal out of the guitar, then back in for the delay, then back out again

That seems what I will have to do.

Since I can not start this project fully now, might be a couple years. I am getting everything ready and learning everything that I can. Planning to have one Seymour Duncan SJBJ-1 JB Jr, one volume knob, and then the delay affect.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It seems that the Rebote2 Delay from Tonepad.com would work for my needs. It seems small enough not to take up too much room and still give the desired effect. Now I am wondering how to change to having and input and ouput connections in the guitar to just an input.

Psw that would seem like the best thing to use to get rid of the battery problem.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ooooh!! That's a fiendishly clever little gadget - basically what it does is take advantage of the way we use a stereo jack as a power switch for active electronics. In a normal active setup, the battery ground is connected to the ring terminal of the stereo jack, and connected to the circuit ground when a mono plug shorts the ring to the sleeve. All they're doing is removing the battery and shorting across the battery clip, and then connecting the positive battery voltage to the ring and the negative to the sleeve, powering up the circuit. If you can find a stereo cord, the rest is pretty trivial - of course, if you're not handy with electronics, $70 isn't really unreasonable for a commercial unit that comes with a warranty, a cable, over-current protection and a low battery indicator.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...